Date   

Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Richard Davenport
 

It was asked by Larry if any eps of the show Ma Perkins survive....I have 422 shows (not cleaned up and de-duped and names cleaned up,etc)  if the date of the show was known I could check if I have it...

Rick

Labor ipse voluptas


On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 7:20:50 PM CDT, Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims@...> wrote:


Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Mike Thomas
 

Fabulous! I think that mist have been Ed Selhorst. That's who I worked with on several detective series. Marlowe, Dragnet YTJD, Barrie Craig etc. I wrote some bios. That was the research stuff I was doing and how I contributed. Under  the radar and Under Ed. Lots of listening too. Lots of fun. 


On Tue, Oct 6, 2020 at 11:30 AM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
Thank you for your reply and encouragement, Mike.  Anyone who reads your post and who belonged to the group back when Jim was running it may be grateful, as I am, for all the good memories it evokes.

I first joined in late 2005, and when I read the mission statement I felt like the group must have been created just for me.  I was so excited that I held my breath hoping that my application would be accepted.  After joining I tried to become involved right away but none of the group leaders seemed interested until a man named Ed (sorry I can't remember his name after all these years) took me on as a proofreader of the certification document he was working on at the time.  After that I always had as much work as I could handle.

Like you, I became involved in distros and increased my collection substantially through participation in those.  It's true that the sound quality of some of them was really poor, but being able to acquire such treasures as The A&P Gypsies and The Bill Kemp Show and Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons was wonderful.

Also, the certified collections seemed to me then, and still do, an important part of the group's overall mission statement.  I was proud to play even a small role in several of them.

Today, I think that producing what Ryan refers to as "Moderated/Certified sets" is probably the group's most important function.  But I hope that curated collections put together by individual members, though perhaps less ambitious and time-consuming, may also come to be considered important.  In one of Paul Kornman's posts I think he mentioned something like an "OTRR RECOMMENDS" section that would direct browsers to these curated sets when they are still new as something different to listen to and enjoy.  Maybe we could even put a counter on them to track how many times they have been viewed and downloaded.  Each of them, as I envision them, will be accompanied by a paragraph explaining the theme of the collection (another of Paul's ideas) and I am planning to submit a one-sentence description of each episode that will help viewers decide whether it seems interesting enough to listen to.  For the Crime Classics episode on William Palmer, for example, the phrase "trust not the physician" might be the only thing necessary-- not even a full sentence.

Larry



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Mike Thomas via groups.io"
To: "Larry Maupin", "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Tuesday October 6 2020 10:48:35AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Larry Maupin
 

Thank you for your reply and encouragement, Mike.  Anyone who reads your post and who belonged to the group back when Jim was running it may be grateful, as I am, for all the good memories it evokes.

I first joined in late 2005, and when I read the mission statement I felt like the group must have been created just for me.  I was so excited that I held my breath hoping that my application would be accepted.  After joining I tried to become involved right away but none of the group leaders seemed interested until a man named Ed (sorry I can't remember his name after all these years) took me on as a proofreader of the certification document he was working on at the time.  After that I always had as much work as I could handle.

Like you, I became involved in distros and increased my collection substantially through participation in those.  It's true that the sound quality of some of them was really poor, but being able to acquire such treasures as The A&P Gypsies and The Bill Kemp Show and Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons was wonderful.

Also, the certified collections seemed to me then, and still do, an important part of the group's overall mission statement.  I was proud to play even a small role in several of them.

Today, I think that producing what Ryan refers to as "Moderated/Certified sets" is probably the group's most important function.  But I hope that curated collections put together by individual members, though perhaps less ambitious and time-consuming, may also come to be considered important.  In one of Paul Kornman's posts I think he mentioned something like an "OTRR RECOMMENDS" section that would direct browsers to these curated sets when they are still new as something different to listen to and enjoy.  Maybe we could even put a counter on them to track how many times they have been viewed and downloaded.  Each of them, as I envision them, will be accompanied by a paragraph explaining the theme of the collection (another of Paul's ideas) and I am planning to submit a one-sentence description of each episode that will help viewers decide whether it seems interesting enough to listen to.  For the Crime Classics episode on William Palmer, for example, the phrase "trust not the physician" might be the only thing necessary-- not even a full sentence.

Larry



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Mike Thomas via groups.io"
To: "Larry Maupin", "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Tuesday October 6 2020 10:48:35AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Mike Thomas
 

Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Larry Maupin
 

I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Ryan Ellett
 

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

mcoates
 

I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:

The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott


Re: Searching for an America's town meeting of the air episode from 1938

bob_pedersen@...
 

There were two Town Hall shows on April 28, 1938. The first, from 2:00 to 3:15, was a Town Hall luncheon held at the Hotel Astor. David Sarnoff, Anne O’Hare McCormick and Dorothy Thompson were guests.
 
The Town Hall Meeting program, at 9:30, was entitled, “What Is the American Way.” Its panel featured Colonel Frank Knox of the Chicago Daily News, Alfred Bingham, and Professor T.V. Smith of the University of Chicago.
 
Unfortunately, I don’t know if either of the shows are available.
 
Bob Pedersen
 
From: Bob Stepno
Sent: Saturday, October 3, 2020 7:36 PM
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Searching for an America's town meeting of the air episode from 1938
 
A friend who is a journalism historian at NYU is searching for a recording of an episode of the NBC series America's Town Meeting of the Air from the last week in April, 1938, featuring David Sarnoff, Dorothy Thompson, and Anne O'Hare McCormick discussing Democracy and American Ideals.
 
I've checked the otrr library and the internet archive without finding that particular episode.
 
I tried to access the NBC collection at the Library of Congress via its Sonic/STAR listings tonight, but got a database error message suggesting that part of the system is down for maintenance, or maybe that the webpage simply does not work from the Android phone I'm doing my searching with.
 
Since most of my own OTR research involves simply writing *about* radio program episodes that are already available as MP3 at public websites, I have never used the Library of Congress audio collection. Neither has my friend at NYU, as far as I know. Advice on using that collection?
 
The script of the program and other information may be at the New York Public Library, and she will be checking there next week.... but actually hearing the recorded program would be a bonus.
 
Do any of you know whether that April 27th or 28th 1938 recording might be at the Library of Congress, or available elsewhere? Thanks!
 
Bob at Jheroes.com
 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Searching for an America's town meeting of the air episode from 1938

Ryan Ellett
 

Perhaps, and likely. But Goldin's listings are not infallible, either.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Sunday, October 4, 2020, 10:23:43 AM CDT, Bob Stepno <rstepno@...> wrote:


Coincidentally, Goldin's index describes an entirely different episode for that week, not the one that my friend found listed in two different newspaper radio schedules.... Perhaps a solid example of the inaccuracies in newspaper listings that I've seen mentioned in discussions before.

Did the guests the professor saw listed in two widely distant newspapers for  April 27th or April 28th ever actually appear? Or was that episode replaced?


Re: Searching for an America's town meeting of the air episode from 1938

Bob@...
 

Coincidentally, Goldin's index describes an entirely different episode for that week, not the one that my friend found listed in two different newspaper radio schedules.... Perhaps a solid example of the inaccuracies in newspaper listings that I've seen mentioned in discussions before.

Did the guests the professor saw listed in two widely distant newspapers for  April 27th or April 28th ever actually appear? Or was that episode replaced?


Searching for an America's town meeting of the air episode from 1938

Bob@...
 

A friend who is a journalism historian at NYU is searching for a recording of an episode of the NBC series America's Town Meeting of the Air from the last week in April, 1938, featuring David Sarnoff, Dorothy Thompson, and Anne O'Hare McCormick discussing Democracy and American Ideals.

I've checked the otrr library and the internet archive without finding that particular episode. 

I tried to access the NBC collection at the Library of Congress via its Sonic/STAR listings tonight, but got a database error message suggesting that part of the system is down for maintenance, or maybe that the webpage simply does not work from the Android phone I'm doing my searching with.

Since most of my own OTR research involves simply writing *about* radio program episodes that are already available as MP3 at public websites, I have never used the Library of Congress audio collection. Neither has my friend at NYU, as far as I know. Advice on using that collection?

The script of the program and other information may be at the New York Public Library, and she will be checking there next week.... but actually hearing the recorded program would be a bonus.

Do any of you know whether that April 27th or 28th 1938 recording might be at the Library of Congress, or available elsewhere? Thanks!

Bob at Jheroes.com


Re: Fw: BBC Radio Drama

Larry Maupin
 

Chris, I'm glad you are enjoying the posts, and thank you for all the links.  It will be an adventure for everyone to be able to explore the different series that they lead to.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Chris J Brady via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday October 3 2020 12:21:29PM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Fw: BBC Radio Drama

Interesting posts recently. Thank you.

Larry and the rest of you guys need to know about a great source for Brit. radio drama.

https://archive.org/details/radioarchive.cx
https://archive.org/download/radioarchive.cx/

To download click on the entry in the listings

https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%204
https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%204%20drama

https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%204%20extra
https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%204%20extra%20drama

https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%202
https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%202%20drama

To download a programme click on the VBR link; the MU3 file contains the link to the MP3 file, you can download this last

CJB
----- Forwarded message -----
From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <digestnoreply@groups.io>
To: "chrisjbrady@..." <chrisjbrady@...>
Sent: Saturday, 3 October 2020, 14:11:42 BST
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Old Time Radio Researchers - Digest #290

Groups.io
This is a digest for Old Time Radio Researchers. View all your groups.io groups, and edit your subscriptions, here.
Do not reply to this email. To reply to a message, click the Reply link under the message.
Topics in this digest:
.
1. Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1
messages:
.
1a. 
Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1
From: Larry Maupin
Date: Fri, 02 Oct 2020 08:44:13 PDT

Scott, your message is replete with interesting details and suggestions.  I know that Radio Spirits has put together a lot of attractively packaged sets, but I have not purchased anything from it in years.  I think the prices are too high, and sometimes have been disappointed in the audio quality of its recordings.  Others may still like it because the illustrations on the boxes would make a collection of them look nice in a display case or on a mantle.


As for contemporary British radio, I agree that it is a wonderful source of dramatic programs.  I am including three post-1967 series in the curated set I am working on for that very reason.  I think these can qualify under the CBS Radio Mystery Theater exception because David is in the process of certifying that collection, and all the episodes in it were aired after 1962.  I also have dozens of episodes of series such as Saturday Night at the Movies, Saturday Night Theatre, Play of the Week  and Playhouse BBC on cassettes that could comprise a curated set but would probably have to be placed on the Internet Archive because they are not considered old-time radio programs and are all British.

As for curated collections of American Golden Age radio, I think your idea is a good one.  The best thing about these is that there are so many different ways to group episodes into collections that we could have many of them if other members decide to curate their own.  It could be a type of character as you suggest.  I have noticed that there are many characters like Shuffle Shober in Ma Perkins who sound like an ignorant bumpkin but are credited with a homespun wisdom and a good heart, and sometimes turn out to be right on moral issues.  Then there is the seductive homewrecker like Regina Rawlings in Backstage Wife and Alec Ransom in Road of Life

I will stop here, but thank you for the post and I hope other members will have something to say on this topic. 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday October 2 2020 7:58:39AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin
View/Reply Online | Reply To Group | Reply To Sender | Mute Topic | Top ^ | New Topic
Groups.io © 2020 Groups.io
You are receiving this email because you are subscribed to main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io via chrisjbrady@.... You can unsubscribe here.

--
Larry Maupin


Fw: BBC Radio Drama

Chris J Brady
 

Interesting posts recently. Thank you.

Larry and the rest of you guys need to know about a great source for Brit. radio drama.

https://archive.org/details/radioarchive.cx
https://archive.org/download/radioarchive.cx/

To download click on the entry in the listings

https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%204
https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%204%20drama

https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%204%20extra
https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%204%20extra%20drama

https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%202
https://archive.org/search.php?query=bbc%20radio%202%20drama

To download a programme click on the VBR link; the MU3 file contains the link to the MP3 file, you can download this last

CJB
----- Forwarded message -----
From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <digestnoreply@groups.io>
To: "chrisjbrady@..." <chrisjbrady@...>
Sent: Saturday, 3 October 2020, 14:11:42 BST
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Old Time Radio Researchers - Digest #290

Groups.io
This is a digest for Old Time Radio Researchers. View all your groups.io groups, and edit your subscriptions, here.
Do not reply to this email. To reply to a message, click the Reply link under the message.
Topics in this digest:
.
1. Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1
messages:
.
1a. 
Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1
From: Larry Maupin
Date: Fri, 02 Oct 2020 08:44:13 PDT

Scott, your message is replete with interesting details and suggestions.  I know that Radio Spirits has put together a lot of attractively packaged sets, but I have not purchased anything from it in years.  I think the prices are too high, and sometimes have been disappointed in the audio quality of its recordings.  Others may still like it because the illustrations on the boxes would make a collection of them look nice in a display case or on a mantle.


As for contemporary British radio, I agree that it is a wonderful source of dramatic programs.  I am including three post-1967 series in the curated set I am working on for that very reason.  I think these can qualify under the CBS Radio Mystery Theater exception because David is in the process of certifying that collection, and all the episodes in it were aired after 1962.  I also have dozens of episodes of series such as Saturday Night at the Movies, Saturday Night Theatre, Play of the Week  and Playhouse BBC on cassettes that could comprise a curated set but would probably have to be placed on the Internet Archive because they are not considered old-time radio programs and are all British.

As for curated collections of American Golden Age radio, I think your idea is a good one.  The best thing about these is that there are so many different ways to group episodes into collections that we could have many of them if other members decide to curate their own.  It could be a type of character as you suggest.  I have noticed that there are many characters like Shuffle Shober in Ma Perkins who sound like an ignorant bumpkin but are credited with a homespun wisdom and a good heart, and sometimes turn out to be right on moral issues.  Then there is the seductive homewrecker like Regina Rawlings in Backstage Wife and Alec Ransom in Road of Life

I will stop here, but thank you for the post and I hope other members will have something to say on this topic. 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday October 2 2020 7:58:39AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott
--
Larry Maupin View/Reply Online | Reply To Group | Reply To Sender | Mute Topic | Top ^ | New Topic
Groups.io © 2020 Groups.io
You are receiving this email because you are subscribed to main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io via chrisjbrady@.... You can unsubscribe here.


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Larry Maupin
 

Scott, your message is replete with interesting details and suggestions.  I know that Radio Spirits has put together a lot of attractively packaged sets, but I have not purchased anything from it in years.  I think the prices are too high, and sometimes have been disappointed in the audio quality of its recordings.  Others may still like it because the illustrations on the boxes would make a collection of them look nice in a display case or on a mantle.

As for contemporary British radio, I agree that it is a wonderful source of dramatic programs.  I am including three post-1967 series in the curated set I am working on for that very reason.  I think these can qualify under the CBS Radio Mystery Theater exception because David is in the process of certifying that collection, and all the episodes in it were aired after 1962.  I also have dozens of episodes of series such as Saturday Night at the Movies, Saturday Night Theatre, Play of the Week  and Playhouse BBC on cassettes that could comprise a curated set but would probably have to be placed on the Internet Archive because they are not considered old-time radio programs and are all British.

As for curated collections of American Golden Age radio, I think your idea is a good one.  The best thing about these is that there are so many different ways to group episodes into collections that we could have many of them if other members decide to curate their own.  It could be a type of character as you suggest.  I have noticed that there are many characters like Shuffle Shober in Ma Perkins who sound like an ignorant bumpkin but are credited with a homespun wisdom and a good heart, and sometimes turn out to be right on moral issues.  Then there is the seductive homewrecker like Regina Rawlings in Backstage Wife and Alec Ransom in Road of Life

I will stop here, but thank you for the post and I hope other members will have something to say on this topic. 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday October 2 2020 7:58:39AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott
--
Larry Maupin


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Scott Galley
 

The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott


Re: HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

M Myers
 

Yep. He was already short with me


On Sep 28, 2020, at 8:12 AM, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

I'm glad you received it Rosalie.  Your quotation reminds me of something I used to say when I was in the insurance business and attended a lot of meetings.  Someone would come up to me and ask, "What's going on?" and I would reply "I don't know.  I just got here."

I hope you read all the summaries and enjoy them.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Rosalie Lunger"
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 27 2020 3:54:28PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I just got it 40 mins ago, sorry..And I just got on the net..
" People keep asking me how things are going, like I ever knew what was going on in the first place."



Disclaimer
All movies/music/books we send are for evaluation purposes. 
We receive NO financial gain from sharing these movies/music with you. 
These movies/music are copyrighted by the artists and/or their companies. 
This is a *NON PROFIT* List. 
~Fair Use Act~
In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is being distributed under fair use without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for non-profit research and educational or criticism purpose only.
Copyrights retained by the original artist.
No copyright infringement intended.


Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 3:12 PM Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:
Series: Unwritten Law

Episode Title: "The Case of the Ladies' Directory"

Broadcast Date: July 24, 1998

Network: BBC Radio 2

Background: By the mid 1950s Great Britain had begun efforts to deal with the problem of prostitution by updating laws governing the occupation.  These included The Sexual Offenses Act of 1956, The Obscene Publications Act of 1959 and The Street Offenses Act of 1959.  

The Case: Frederick Charles Shaw was charged with conspiracy to corrupt public morals because he published a magazine entitled The Ladies' Directory which was intended to provide prostitutes with a legal means of advertising.  Prosecuting attorneys disagreed, accusing Shaw and others of conspiring "to debauch and corrupt the morals of youth and diverse other subjects of the Queen, and to raise and create in their minds inordinate lustful desires."

Significance: The case eventually found its way to the Supreme Court of Great Britain, with the issues being whether prostitution should continue to be a legal profession and, if so, by what means should "ladies of the night" be permitted to advertise.  One important matter addressed by the court was the fact that juries usually refused outright to convict prostitutes, so what good were laws that were so out of touch with the sentiment of the electorate that they seldom led to convictions? 

Outcome: I will leave it to listeners to learn Shaw's fate, but one indication of the case's importance is that it led the court's Chief Justice himself to ponder the difficulty of adjudicating cases in which the laws conflict so sharply with public opinion.  The question was even raised as to whether landlords who rented to prostitutes should be prosecuted under The Street Offenses Act of 1959 because the money for the rent itself was earned by an activity that corrupted public morals.  The Chief Justice finally summed up the court's dilemma by stating that "where Parliament fears to tread it is not for the courts to rush in."

Conclusion: This seems to have left matters up in the air, but it is clear that prostitution remained legal and that advertising in printed publications survived the effort to suppress The Ladies' Directory and other material of the same kind.  Women of relaxed virtue were allowed to continue characterizing themselves as dancers, massage therapists, and anything else that sounded legitimate and respectable with impunity.  

--
Larry Maupin


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Larry Maupin


Re: Casey, Crime Photographer presentation

David Lines
 

Excellent presentation! Thanks!


On Tue, Sep 29, 2020, 8:52 AM Joe Webb via groups.io <drjoewebb=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The video is now available on YouTube and there's no need to go to Facebook to see it https://youtu.be/QqsPHkdBMaY

--


Re: Casey, Crime Photographer presentation

Joe Webb
 

The video is now available on YouTube and there's no need to go to Facebook to see it https://youtu.be/QqsPHkdBMaY

--


Re: Casey, Crime Photographer presentation

Scott Galley
 

Wonderful! Looking forward to watching this. One of our all-time favourite shows, so any tidbits about the show and its cast are a real treat.

Scott


otrDBPlayer UI and Other Changes

Wild West Designs
 

I made some UI and other changes to the to the stand alone player program.

I'm still using Qt, but I went from widgets to QML and this will get me closer to being able to have an Android build as this GUI framework handles touch interfaces  and the responsive needs of that platform as well compared to the desktop centric widget based framework.

One thing of note, the mic icon top left exposes the majority of player controls.

I've attached pictures, you can get the release for Linux and Windows here: https://github.com/wwderw/otrDB_Radio_Player/releases/tag/3.0.0

For those on Linux, be mindful of the caveat in the release notes.

Take it for a test spin, please report issues, suggestions etc at Github as that way it provides a central place for me to track and keep up with everything.

If anyone would like to contribute to program specifically, let me know, I welcome any and all help.  On a side note, using QML does allow for javescript to be used, so for those on here that are more familiar with JS versus C++ (what was used in the original program), this new version allows for both and the programming logic used in this version is mainly JS.

On another note, I wanted to see if there was enough interest in me moving the main database program to QML, so their can be an Android build.  The downside is that the database will be read only due to packaging of the apk files.  Which to me would be fine as I can't imagine people wanting to do prolonged changes to a database on their cell phone, even if it was hooked up to external components (monitor, keyboard, mouse etc).  So I don't necessarily see that as an issue, but it would be more about if it was worth it to have the program period on the phone or not, so I thought I would gauge interest on that front.

Enjoy.

Evan

3381 - 3400 of 5114