Date   
Re: Links

Larry Maupin
 

Hi Mike,

Thank you very much for your message and for your kind words about my participation in the group.  Tomorrow morning I expect to post the final two listener reports on the project I have been working on with Ryan.  This has involved the listening to and writing reports on 63 episodes, and has taken me more than a month to complete.

I have been hoping to work on one of your projects next, but would like to start with something of a shorter duration, at least at the beginning.  The only issue is that while I love radio soap operas, I do not much enjoy OTR comedy shows.  So if you are working on any other programs and need someone to write full listener reports on them or even just episode summaries or to check for spots that need sound editing, one or more of those might be a better match for me.

If you just need help on Duffy's at this time, how about starting with 14 episodes?  I think those shows are 30 minutes long, and I can do one every day for two weeks and then we'll see where we are and proceed from there.  I can start on Duffy or anything else you want me to do as soon as I get the episodes from you.

I will look for another message from you letting me know what you think and how you want to proceed.  

Best regards,

Larry  

-----------------------------------------

From: "Mike Thomas via Groups.Io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday March 25 2020 1:50:23PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Links

Hi Larry.

I cannot answer your questions on the page stuff but I want to acknowledge your detailed work and time you are spending on group stuff.

I am really liking both Archie and Clifford Finnegan on Duffys Tavern. They are a blast!

Although Archie isn't a comedian the writing makes for so many belly laughs on that show. They along with me. Duffy make a fabulous team.

I vote Archie. The dialogue is superb and will not disappoint.

That being said, I and several members have been listening to DT for certification. It's a bit slow going. All shows we have have been listened to now abd we are ready for seconds.

Are you interested? If so I will send you chunks of shows.

I see you are diligent!

Let me know and thanks!

Mike from Medford


On Wed, Mar 25, 2020 at 8:12 AM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
Hello to all.  I am wondering what happened to all the links that used to be on the left side of the home page.  Since they have disappeared, I do not see how to access the database, files, profiles of other members, or even a link to create a new poll.  My current project of writing listener reports on sixty-three of the newly acquired episodes published by Ryan in the January/February issue of "The Old Radio Times" will be completed tomorrow morning, and I am thinking of putting up a new poll on the funniest old-time radio character if I can do so.

Will someone please either post a message to all members and/or reply to this one with an answer about what happened to the links, and especially how any member can create a new poll?

Thank you very much.

Larry

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin

Re: Links

Mike Thomas
 

Hi Larry.

I cannot answer your questions on the page stuff but I want to acknowledge your detailed work and time you are spending on group stuff.

I am really liking both Archie and Clifford Finnegan on Duffys Tavern. They are a blast!

Although Archie isn't a comedian the writing makes for so many belly laughs on that show. They along with me. Duffy make a fabulous team.

I vote Archie. The dialogue is superb and will not disappoint.

That being said, I and several members have been listening to DT for certification. It's a bit slow going. All shows we have have been listened to now abd we are ready for seconds.

Are you interested? If so I will send you chunks of shows.

I see you are diligent!

Let me know and thanks!

Mike from Medford


On Wed, Mar 25, 2020 at 8:12 AM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
Hello to all.  I am wondering what happened to all the links that used to be on the left side of the home page.  Since they have disappeared, I do not see how to access the database, files, profiles of other members, or even a link to create a new poll.  My current project of writing listener reports on sixty-three of the newly acquired episodes published by Ryan in the January/February issue of "The Old Radio Times" will be completed tomorrow morning, and I am thinking of putting up a new poll on the funniest old-time radio character if I can do so.

Will someone please either post a message to all members and/or reply to this one with an answer about what happened to the links, and especially how any member can create a new poll?

Thank you very much.

Larry

--
Larry Maupin

Links

Larry Maupin
 

Hello to all.  I am wondering what happened to all the links that used to be on the left side of the home page.  Since they have disappeared, I do not see how to access the database, files, profiles of other members, or even a link to create a new poll.  My current project of writing listener reports on sixty-three of the newly acquired episodes published by Ryan in the January/February issue of "The Old Radio Times" will be completed tomorrow morning, and I am thinking of putting up a new poll on the funniest old-time radio character if I can do so.

Will someone please either post a message to all members and/or reply to this one with an answer about what happened to the links, and especially how any member can create a new poll?

Thank you very much.

Larry

--
Larry Maupin

Listener Report Number 61

Larry Maupin
 

LXI. Program: When a Girl Marries

Broadcast Date: November 3, 1948

Sponsor: Calumet Baking Powder

Suggested Episode Title: "Harry's Kidnapper Becomes Desperate"

Opening: Theme music, then introduction followed by Calumet commercial ("with a picture of the Calumet Injun' chief on the big bright red can").  "And now 'When a Girl Marries', the story of Joan and Harry Davis."

Summary: Ann is alone in her suite at the Summerville Hotel.  She debates what to do next, and vows to get what she wants no matter who it hurts.  A line is obscure in which she seems to be thinking of herself as Peter Stanley's mistress.

The next scene takes us to Harry Davis, who is still somewhere between Sandwood and his home in Beechwood.  His captor plans to take Harry's car and escape, but insists on taking Harry with him until he has completely worked out his strategy.  Then we go to the Davis farm house, where it is four o'clock in the morning.  Joan has become hysterical from worry about what has happened to Harry, and Mother Davis tries to calm her down.  Joan decides to call the police.

Closing: "We'll be back with you in a moment.  Then a Calumet commercial.  "So there until tomorrow at the same time we leave the story of 'When a Girl Marries'. written by Elaine Carrington.  Your narrator is Charles Black."

Notes: (1) This episode does not have as much substance as the two prior ones; (2) The recording could use some additional sound editing.  Quite a few words cannot be heard clearly enough to be understood.

--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 60

Larry Maupin
 

LX. Program: When a Girl Marries

Broadcast Date: November 2, 1948

Sponsor: Calumet Baking Powder

Episode Title: "Ann Keeps Changing Her Mind" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music, then introduction.  Then a commercial for Calumet.  "And now, 'When a Girl Marries', the story of Joan and Harry Davis.  Ann Darling came right to the Summerville Hotel after her visit to Walter Connolly's office, where she said that she had changed her mind about buying the Clawson estate, and even though Walter had warned her that the deal was closed she had intentionally tried to get out from under it."

Summary: There are two scenes in this episode.  One of them takes place in Walter Connolly's office and consists mostly of our hearing Ann's thoughts as she stands looking out the window at the storm and reflects upon her present situation.  She is in love with Phil Stanley, who may or may not have been having an affair with her, and is trying to break up his marriage to Cathy.  In a recent conversation, she told Phil that he "can't stand strong women" and that he needs to be doted upon by someone like that "sweet young idiot" he married.  He replied by telling her that she is totally unscrupulous and that he will make sure she never sees him or Cathy again.

The other scene is at the farm house of Joan and Harry Davis.  As the clock strikes 11pm. Harry's mother and Joan are worried about him and wondering why he has not come home yet.  They are unaware that he is being held at gunpoint by the man who stopped him on the road and asked for help.

Conclusion: Another Calumet commercial.  Then "So there until tomorrow at the same time we leave the story of 'When a Girl Marries'."  Then a Baker's Coconut commercial.  "This is NBC, the National Broadcasting Company."

Notes: (1) A very good episode.  Ann's emotional turmoil is strongly evident, and it is difficult not to sympathize with her; (2) Much of this can be heard only with careful listening, and a couple of lines are unintelligible.  But Ann is by far the best part of the episode, and all of her lines come across very clearly.  

--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 58 and 59

Larry Maupin
 

LVIII. Program: We Love and Learn

Broadcast Date: August 11, 1950

Sponsor: Sweetheart Soap

Episode Title: "Jim Argues About His Finances" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music.  Then "The makers of Sweetheart Soap present the modern drama 'We Love and Learn'."  Then a commercial for Sweetheart Soap.  "Jim Carlton sits quietly in his favorite armchair studying a manual on salesmanship.  His wife Thelma has left the apartment to get the evening papers and Jim is alone with his mother who, he is about to discover, has a great deal on her mind."

Summary: Jim's mother Ada chides him for spending $300 on clothes in one week.  She says he bought "jewelry and fancy clothes" with money that should have been used to pay "regular bills" and support his and Thelma's baby.  She adds that his father died penniless, but that fortunately she had taken out a life insurance policy on him that provided her with a monthly income after his death.  Jim then goes to see Stuart Morgan, who is apparently his sales manager.  He thanks Jim for introducing him to Mickey (a woman), whom he finds very attractive and has bought a friendship ring for.  Jim then asks Stuart to get one just like it for him to give to Thelma, and says he will pay him for it tomorrow.

Conclusion: Theme music, then another commercial for Sweetheart Soap and one for Blue-White Flakes.  Then "Listen at this same time Monday-through-Friday to 'We Love and Learn'.  This is Louis Warren speaking for the makers of Sweetheart Soap and Blue-White Flakes.  When you hear Walter O'Keefe you'll know it's 'Double or Nothing' on NBC."  Then the chimes.

Notes: (1) A very enjoyable episode; (2) Excellent sound throughout.


LIX. Program: When a Girl Marries

Broadcast Date: November 1, 1948

Sponsor: Calumet Baking Powder

Episode Title: "Cathy Safe From the Storm-- The Hitchhiker" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music, then "'When a Girl Marries', a story of young married life dedicated to everyone who has ever been in love."  Then a commercial for Calumet,

Summary: The scene is set at night in a farm house during a thunderstorm.  Phil and Cathy, the married couple who live there, are having a conversation just prior to Phil's leaving.  They discuss their baby boy and imagine what his life will be like.  Cathy tells Phil how much she loves him, and he confides in her that he has "been hurt a lot" in matters of the heart, and at first did not trust that she could love him.  But now he does.

Meanwhile, Harry Davis is on his way to Beechwood and stops to help another motorist who seems to have run out of gas and to be stranded in the storm.  Then the man pulls a gun on Harry and warns him to "do as I say."

Conclusion: Another commercial for Calumet.  Then "Until tomorrow at the same time we leave the story of 'When a Girl Marries', with Mary Jane Higby and written by Elaine Carrington.  Your narrator was Charles Stark."  Then a commercial for Baker's Coconut.  Then "This is NBC, the National Broadcasting Company."

Notes: (1) This is the first of four episodes aired on consecutive days, so the story line here will be continued in my next three reports.  There are only four more reports altogether before the project will be completed on Thursday; (2) The sound is very good throughout.

--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 56 and 57

Larry Maupin
 

LVI. Program: Vic and Sade

Broadcast Date: April 3, 1939.  

Sponsor: Crisco (commercials elided)

Episode Title: "Rush Draws List of Acquaintances" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music, "And now get ready to smile again with radio's home folks, Vic and Sade.  Written by Paul Wright."

Summary: The three characters in this episode are Victor and Sade Gook (not a typo) and their adopted son Rush.  According to Jim Cox in his "Historical Dictionary of American Radio Soap Operas" (p.236), the Gooks live in Crooper, Illinois which explains the mention of Peoria, Rockford, Springfield, Moline and Decatur in this episode.

There is no plot here to speak of.  The three discuss such matters as Rush's algebra homework, the rumor that Miss Harris (a teacher at the local high school) has a cold, and the definition of a "speaking acquaintance." The parents sound as if their intelligence level is dull normal, and Sade has an annoying, idiotic laugh.  Rush seems somewhat more intelligent.

Closing: "[This] concludes another brief interlude at the small house halfway up on the next block.  And so we leave Mrs. Beach and Crisco's 'Vic and Sade' until the next time.  Don't forget to listen."  Then theme music.  Then "This is Ed Roberts speaking.  This program comes to you from Chicago and New York.  This is the National Broadcasting Company."

Notes: (1) There is some debate about whether this is a soap opera.  John Dunning says no, while Jim Cox does include it in his dictionary.  It reminds me of "Scattergood Baines" in its inanity and of characters like Shuffle Shober in "Ma Perkins" who are always spouting homespun wisdom and saying such things as "I see trouble a-brewin'"; (2) The audio quality is very good.


LVII. Program: We Love and Learn

Broadcast Date: Friday, June 24, 1949

Sponsor: Sweetheart Soap

Episode Title: ""Jim Accuses His Mother of Foul Play" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: "The makers of Sweetheart Soap present the comedy-drama 'We Love and Learn'."  Then a commercial for Sweetheart Soap.

Summary: Jim Cartland's wife Thelma has left him, and he blames his meddlesome mother Ada.  The entire episode involves a conversation between the two of them in which Jim accuses his mother of deliberately breaking up his marriage and she denies any wrongdoing.  However, Jim is convinced that Ada conspired with his uncle Prentice Talbot, and that Talbot was the person who sent Thelma a love letter and a diamond bracelet with the intention of making Jim insanely jealous when he found out about it.  Whoever sent the the items, Jim did find them and the resulting confrontation with Thelma ended with her leaving him.  Will Jim be able to persuade her to reconcile with him?  Will Ada's weak heart fail under the strain of her grief and anxiety after Jim vows to move out of her home and leave her alone?

Conclusion: Another Sweetheart Soap commercial, and then one for Blue-White Laundry Soap.  Then "At this same time Monday, 'We Love and Learn'.  This is Dick Dunham speaking for the makers of Sweetheart Soap and Blue-White Flakes.  Stay tuned for the songs of Jack Birch, which follows immediately over most of these NBC stations."  Then "This is NBC, the National Broadcasting Company."

Note: The audio quality is excellent throughout.

 





--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 54 and 55

Larry Maupin
 

LIV. Program: The Woman In My House

Broadcast Date: Undetermined

Sponsor: Sweetheart Soap

Suggested Episode Title: "Does Jeff Want Carolyn For Himself?"

Opening: "The makers of Sweetheart Soap present 'The Woman in My House'.  Imperious man, look in your heart and dwell on this: without the woman in my house, what would I be?"  Then theme music.

Summary: Except for a brief scene in the Carter home at the beginning in which Virginia Carter, daughter of James and Jessie, announces her intention to return to work, the entire episode involves a conversation between their son Jeff and a young widow named Carolyn.  Jeff's younger brother Clay has been dating Carolyn since the death of her husband, and Clay believes that she expects a proposal of marriage from him.  But Carolyn assures Jeff that she does not anticipate that at all, and in fact has already burned the love letters that Clay wrote her.  Jeff has invited Carolyn to dinner.  When she suggests that they have a drink first, he replies that alcohol is used to deaden the senses, and that when he is in the company of someone as charming and attractive as she, he wants his senses to be at their most acute. 

Conclusion: "Listen tomorrow, when Clay Carter attempts to exchange confidences with Sandy, but finds that she won't talk.  Today featured Janice Scott as Mother Carter, Alice Reinheart and Jeff Tremayne as Virginia and Jeff.  This is Charles Lyon speaking for the makers of Sweetheart Soap and Blue-White Flakes."

Notes: (1) What will happen when Clay learns that Jeff took Carolyn out to dinner?  This is a very good episode, full of characters and matters of the home and hearth; (2) The audio quality is excellent.


LV. Program: The Woman in My House

Broadcast Date: December 22, 1955. KNBC-San Francisco. 

Sponsor: Miles Laboratories (Alka-Seltzer, One-a-Day Vitamins, Tabcin).

Episode Title: "Father Carter Is Recovering From Mumps" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: "The Woman in My House' is brought to you by Miles Laboratories, makers of Alka-Seltzer and many other fine pharmaceutical products."  Then a commercial for One-a-Day Brand Multiple Vitamins.

Summary: Downstairs at the home of James and Jessie Carter on Elm Street.  James is looking out the window and his son Peter comes home.  They discuss James' philosophy of marriage at some length.  They also touch on Sandy's decision to stay home while her husband Mike goes to France for a month.  Mike and Sandy arrive in their car, then go to see Jeff in his studio apartment on the third floor.  Sandy exhibits some jealousy over Catherine, and old girlfriend of Jeff's with whom he has been to a restaurant in Chicago.  Jeff intervenes and a kiss smoothes matters over (for now).

Closing: A commercial for Tabcin.  Then "Be listening when a Christmas shopping tour ends in a startling fashion....'The Woman in My House' is brought to you Monday-through-Friday by the makers of Alka-Seltzer [and is] a Carlton E. Morse production.  This is the NBC Radio Network."

Notes: (1) There is some ambiguity about the setting of this episode.  According to Jim Cox in "Historical Dictionary of American Radio Soap Operas", the serial "was set in Miami {and] dealt with the domestic issues impinging on the Carters of Dade County." (pp. 247-248). But the reference in this episode to Mike's dinner with Catherine in Chicago sounds as if Chicago is nearby.  However, Cox is a good authority, and if he is correct then we can add Miami to the list of actual cities where radio soap operas were set.  Cox also mentions that Carlton E. Morse created the more famous "One Man's Family," which as many listeners will remember was set in Sea Cliff, a real or fictitious area of San Francisco; (2) All the surviving OTR broadcasts, including this one, that were recorded from KNBC-San Francisco seem to have excellent sound quality.


--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Numbers 51-thru-53

Larry Maupin
 

LI. Program: Stella Dallas

Broadcast Date: December 22, 1955. KNBC-San Francisco. NBC

Sponsor: Sustained by NBC.  PSA for CARE.

Suggested Episode Title: "Raymond Wiley Plots His Revenge"

Opening: Theme music from the beautiful "How Can I Leave Thee," then the introduction  and an announcement that a donation of one dollar will provide a 24-pound CARE package for those in need.  "And now, "Stella Dallas."

Summary: Raymond Wiley, business partner of Stella's ex-husband Stephen Dallas, plans to kill both Stephen and Stella to secure his title to properties in Brazil on which Wiley has built a multi-million dollar empire in coffee, rubber and diamonds.  Hoping to save her life, Stephen plans to ask Stella to re-marry.

Closing: "Be sure to listen tomorrow-- same time, same station-- to "Stella Dallas'."  Then a promo for "Weekday."

Notes: (1) There is a lot of interesting detail in this episode.  Stella lives in a rooming house in Boston; Stephen has sent her a box of pale yellow roses; Stephen and Stella take a cab to lunch at the Beverly Hotel in downtown Boston; daughter Lolly made the hat Stella is wearing.  This is the only radio soap opera I am aware of that was set in Boston.  Real-life locations for others were New York, Chicago and Hollywood.  "Young Widder Brown" was set in Simpsonville, West Virginia, which sounds as if it should be a real place and perhaps is; the same with Rosehaven, Long Island, home of the Nobles in "Backstage Wife"; (2) A good recording.


LII.  Program: Strange

Broadcast Date: 1955 (day and month not given)

Sponsor: No commercials.

Suggested Episode Title: Greenwood Acres

Opening: "The story you are about to hear is true, but strange.  The ABC network presents strange, true stories of the supernatural."

Summary: The premise of the story is that a man keeps traveling back and forth in time between 1952 and 1865.  Greenwood Acres is an old plantation house, but a man(Lieutenant Proctor) sees it as new.  One day he sees a pretty girl in the water who calls him by his first name (Seth) as if she knows him, but he has never met her before.  She runs away, but when he tells a local woman about what he saw she says that Greenwood Acres is nothing but a ruin now and has been so for many years.  Puzzled, he visits the local library and reads about a girl named Laura who in 1865 loved a soldier named Seth, which would have been a time when the mansion was still beautiful,

Conclusion: "Walter Gibson, your expert on the supernatural and stories of ghosts, of spirits, werewolves and voodoo.  And each story you hear is true, but strange."

Note: The sound quality is fair, with quite a few stretches being almost inaudible."


LIII. Program: The Guiding Light

Broadcast Date: July 15, 1940

Sponsor: Proctor&Gamble's White Naptha Soap

Episode Title: "Rose and Charles Have Dinner" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music, then "The Guiding Light," brought to you by the makers of P&G soap, the White Naptha Soap."  Then a commercial.  "And now, 'The Guiding Light'."

Summary: Rose Kransky and her former employer Charles are having dinner together and have not seen each other recently because Rose has been at home with her new baby.  They have apparently been having an affair, and their conversation is intimate and serious.  Charles' wife Nora has recently died, and Rose believes that Nora's last wish was that Charles and Rose get married.  This seems to be a good idea, but is complicated by the fact that Rose is already married.  They debate what to do.

Conclusion: "Is the president of the publishing company entertaining the idea of a future relationship with his former secretary?  Does he believe the answer to be marriage?"  Then another commercial for White Naptha Soap, followed by theme music.  Then what sounds like ""Torchie receives an offer to return East.  Be sure to listen tomorrow to "The Guiding Light "  This is your announcer Ford Pearson."

Notes: (1) This is an outstanding episode.  I think "The Guiding Light" dealt more frankly and openly with the subject of adultery than any other radio soap opera.  Meta Bauer was also involved in an adulterous relationship during a long story line that has happily been preserved and that fortunately also includes a murder; (2) The sound quality is good for the most part.



--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 49 and 50

Larry Maupin
 

XLIX. Program: Stella Dallas

Broadcast Date:Friday, August 10, 1945. 4:15pm Eastern War Time. WEAF-New York. NBC.

Sponsor: Double Dandureen Dandruff Shampoo; Ironized Yeast

Episode Title: "To Trap Neal and Harriet" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music from "How Can I leave Thee", then "We give you now 'Stella Dallas', the continuation on the air of the true-to-life story of mother love and sacrifice.  These episodes from the later life of Stella Dallas are based on the famous novel of that name by Olive Higgins Prouty, and are written by Anne Hummert."  Then a commercial for Double Dandureen.

Summary: The scene is the home of Neal and Christine Rayburn.  Phil Baxter and Stella have devised a trap  that will prove to Neal that Harriet Rayburn is a bad stepmother to little Teddy and help him see that she is trying to ruin his marriage.

Conclusion: "This is the fateful moment.  This is the moment that will decide Teddy's future, Christine's future.  And there's a totally unexpected surprise just ahead for Stella Dallas."Then another commercial for Double Dandureen.  Then "'Stella Dallas' will be on the air tomorrow-- that is, Monday-- at 4:15pm Eastern War Time.  This is Frank Gallup speaking."  Then an Ironized Yeast spot at the end.

Notes: (1) John Dunning writes in "On The Air" (p.635) that "Stella Dallas" was perhaps the most excruciating melodrama on radio, certainly rivaling and some believe surpassing even the Hummerts' torturous "Backstage Wife" and "Romance of Helen Trent" in the pain-per-minute sweepstakes": (2) The audio quality is superb.


L. Program: Stella Dallas

Broadcast Date: April 25, 1949

Sponsor: Philips' Milk of Magnesia

Episode Title: "Paul Wyman Pays Stella a Visit" according to the OTRR Library listing

Opening: Theme music, then introduction.  Then, "And now, 'Stella Dallas'."

Summary; Paul Wyman comes to see Stella at her home, and she asks him how much his housekeeper Reva Collins had to do with his decision to keep his daughter Celia a prisoner in her own home.  Wyman tells Stella that he will do anything necessary to keep Celia from seeing a young architect who lives nearby.  Then he confides in her that he fears for his daughter's life if she should marry.  He also tells her that in his earlier years he was responsible for someone's death, and that while it may not have been "murder in the eyes of man" it may have been "murder in the eyes of God."  Wyman encounters Stella's daughter Laurel Grosvenor on his way out, and they talk briefly.  Then Laurel ("Lolly") and Stella discuss the matter.

Conclusion: "Stella is in the center of these fierce conflicting emotions.  Celia, Paul and Steven have each asked for her help.  You'll want to hear the full and unusual drama tomorrow on 'Stella Dallas'."  Then another Philips' Milk of Magnesia commercial.  Then theme music.  Then "Stella Dallas will be on the air at this same time tomorrow.  This is Frank Gallup speaking."

Notes:(1) This is a splendid episode.  It shows why "Stella Dallas" is among the handful of radio soap operas that best exemplify their tremendous appeal to millions of listeners; (2) The audio quality is only fair and the recording could use some further editing



--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 47 and 48

Larry Maupin
 

XLVII. Program: The Romance of Helen Trent.  

Broadcast Date: February 6, 1939

Sponsor: Commercials deleted.

Episode Title: "Michael Is Back With Julie" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music, then "Again, 'The Romance of Helen Trent'."

Summary: The entire episode takes place at Helen's penthouse apartment in Hollywood.  She has been hired to design the costumes for a forthcoming Broadway play.  She shares the apartment with actress Julie Downey, who is to be the ingenue lead in the play.  Julie is in love with Michael Fallon, an "eminent portrait painter" who has just returned from Ireland.  Julie is blissfully happy, and Michael has told her that now that he is back in America he wants to create a world just for the two of them.

What Julie does not know is that Michael has told Helen that he is no longer in love with Julie, and that he has developed romantic feelings for Helen herself.  

Conclusion: Helen tells Agatha, "I know there's heartbreak ahead for Julie, and I'm a little afraid there's trouble ahead for me."  Then closing theme music.

Note: The audio quality is very good.


XLVIII. Program: Rosemary

Broadcast Date: Friday, July 12, 1946

Sponsor: Ivory Snow (for dishes)

Episode Title: "Bill Learns About His Mother" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music, then a commercial for Ivory Snow.  "And now Ivory Snow brings you 'Rosemary'."

Summary: At a hospital in Springdale.  Rosemary Dawson's husband Bill Roberts suffers from a rare form of amnesia which causes him to remember only the past (including his first wife and daughter), but nothing about the most recent four years, not even Rosemary.  He wants to return to his home town of Meadville, more than one thousand miles away, to try to pick up the threads of his lost years.  Since he is confined to the hospital and can't go Rosemary, whom he recognizes only as a kind nurse, offers to go for him.

Conclusion: Another Commercial for Ivory Snow.  Then "Ivory Snow invites you to listen Monday to 'Rosemary', written by Elaine Carrington.  This is Harry Clark asking you to remember for speedier dishwashing, for snow-white hands, it's wonderful Ivory Snow."  

Notes: (1) Elaine Carrington also created "Pepper Young's Family" and "When a Girl Marries"; (2) The audio quality is fair.

--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 45 and 46

Larry Maupin
 

XLV.  Program: The Right To Happiness

Broadcast Date: November 25, 1960

Sponsor: Sustained by CBS

Episode Title: "Final Show" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: "This is 'The Right To Happiness', sustained by CBS Radio.  Then strains of "Song of the Soul."  Then "Today, with Grace fully recovered, she and Skip are planning to return to college."

Summary:  This entire episode takes place in the home of Lee and Carolyn McDonald.  Their son Skip has brought his fiancee Grace home with him from college to spend the Thanksgiving holiday with his parents.  In the opening scene they are all sitting at the dinner table eating some of the cake that Grace has baked.  Lee has just become a partner in a local law firm.  After the kids leave to return to college, Lee and Carolyn sit on the sofa and reflect upon their lives together and the meaning of happiness.

Conclusion: More music, then a promo for "Gunsmoke" and "Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar".

Notes: (1) November 25, 1960 was the day that the few remaining radio soap operas aired their final broadcasts.  "Ma Perkins," "The Second Mrs. Burton," and two or three others (including this one of "The Right To Happiness") marked the end of an era during which for many years soap operas had been by far the most popular programs on daytime radio; (2) This recording has excellent sound quality. 


XLVI. Program: Road of Life

Broadcast Date: August 22, 1946

Sponsor: Duz Soap ("D-U-Z does everything")

Suggested Episode Title: "A Crisis at the Hospital"

Opening: "Yes, it's the Duz program, 'Road of Life'."  Followed by the theme from Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique Symphony."  Then a full commercial for Duz.

Summary: The first scene is in the Orderly Room at the [Newman?] Neuropsychiatric Institute.  Five orderlies and their supervisor are preparing to storm a room on the fourteenth floor where Carson McVicker, who has been poisoned by her husband with streptogenic sulfate, lies on a bed between Dr Jim Brent and her murderous husband Harry Fowler.  Harry pulls a gun and threatens to shoot Jim, who rushes him.  Soon the orderlies arrive and help subdue Fowler.  Dr. Brent says he must get an antidote right away, before it is too late to save Carson.

Closing: "Jim Brent rushes from the room.  For Carson McVicker, time is slowly running out."  Then a commercial for Drene Shampoo.  Then "Be sure to listen tomorrow to another absorbing episode of 'Road of Life'.  Brought to you by Duz.  This is Clayton Collier wishing you good day and good Duzzing for Proctor&Gamble, the makers of Duz."  

Note: A good encode.  Every word except the name of the hospital can be heard distinctly, and the name is obscured because several characters are talking at the same time when it is pronounced.



--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 43 and 44

Larry Maupin
 

XLIII. Program: The Right To Happiness

Broadcast Date: Friday, August 10, 1945.  3:45-4:00pm Eastern War Time.  WEAF-New York.  660AM.  NBC.

Sponsor: Ivory Soap

Episode Title: "Emily Sells Her Household Effects" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: "Ivory Soap, ninety-nine and 44/100 percent pure.  Now Ivory Soap's own story, 'The Right To Happiness'."  Then theme music from "Song of the Soul."  Then a full Ivory Soap commercial ("Your hands can have that Ivory look in just twelve days").

Summary: Shortly before noon at the house of Ed and Emily Norton.  Emily is on the telephone with Miss Post, and agrees to sell clothing and household items without the knowledge of her spendthrift husband.  People come "a little after one o'clock" and take away a living room chair, a lamp, candlesticks, dresses, bric-a-brac, etc.  Emily goes to the bank to deposit the proceeds in a secret account and is confronted by her daughter Jane, who knows everything.  Emily explains that she is afraid for the family's financial future and is saving for a rainy day.

Conclusion: Another Ivory Commercial, "Your favorite soap since baby days, it's got those gentle baby ways."

Notes: (1) This is especially interesting for its references to the contents of a typical middle class home in 1945.  Emily has even debated selling their piano, which would have doubled the proceeds, but she was probably concerned that Ed might actually have noticed that!  (2) The sound quality of the recording is pretty good, with some fading and slight distortion throughout.


XLIV. Program: The Right To Happiness

Broadcast Date: December 22, 1955. NBC.

Sponsor: Spic 'n' Span; Cheer Laundry Detergent

Episode Title: "Jack Demands Money From Dr. Thompson" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music from "Song of the Soul," then a mention of "new blue Cheer."

Summary: At the DeWitt home for children in Bridgeton, ruthless Jack Townsend demands that Mike pay him the agreed upon 80% fee on the $50,000 that Carolyn Allen has donated to the home.  Meanwhile, worried that her son Skip may be getting into more trouble at school, Carolyn phones Principal Blair and the speaks face-to-face with Mrs. Sidney, mother of a neighbor boy who runs with a gang.  What she learns is not reassuring.

Conclusion: A Spic 'n' Span commercial.  Then "Carolyn is not quite sure why, but she senses imminent catastrophe."  Then "'The Right To Happiness' has been presented by Proctor&Gamble, makers of Spic 'n' Span, the wonderful once-over cleaner for walls, woodwork and linoleum."  Then a commercial for Cheer followed by "Tomorrow s glimmer of light shines through Carolyn's fears on 'The Right To Happiness'.  Transcribed, this is the NBC Radio Network.  KNBC-San Francisco, a service of RCA."  Finally a local commercial for Lucerne Eggnog as befitting the Yule season: "Get Lucerne Eggnog at your local Safeway Store" singe the happy chorus.

Notes: (1) This famous soap opera ran for twenty-one years; (2) This recorded episode from KNBC has excellent sound quality throughout.

 


--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 41 and 42

Larry Maupin
 

XLI. Program: Pretty Kitty Kelly

Broadcast Date: April 16, 1940

Sponsor: Wonder Bread and Hostess Cakes

Episode Title: "Getting Ready for the Movie" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme from "Kerry Dance," then "The makers of Wonder Bread and Hostess Cakes present 'Pretty Kitty Kelly'."  Then a commercial for Hostess Butterscotch Loaf (a cake).  "Just fifteen cents makes twelve generous slices."

Summary: Several people are gathered "in the living room of Mrs. Mullin's house."  All those invited by Kitty for the showing of the rushes of a new motion picture are on hand.  Edwin Wilde has been murdered.  Kitty has told Oliver Jensen that she plans "to show him the murderer of his brother Edwin Wilde tonight,"  Then she tells Mrs. Mullins that "the murderer appears on the screen."

Conclusion: A film begins to roll and the people in the living room watch intently.  A voice then says "Events that led to the murder of Edwin Wilde on May 21st, 1934."  Then "At last the all-important picture flashes on the small screen that Dennis has set up at one end of Mrs. Mullins's living room.  And the murderer is in the audience!  What thoughts are going through his or her mind as the film unreels?  Who, in short, killed Edwin Wilde?"

Notes: (1) This is a much better episode than the one dated March 9, 1939; it is suspenseful and chilling; (2) The audio quality is only fair.  Both of the recently acquired episodes of this soap opera would benefit from some additional sound editing.


XLII. Program: The Right To Happiness

Broadcast Date: May 21, 1942

Sponsor: Commercials deleted (the episode is nine minutes in length)

Episode Title: "Carolyn's Murder Trial Ends" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: "And now, 'The Right To Happiness'.  Then theme music.  Then "I am the past; invisible, unseen and yet the living, whispering fate.  You've heard my voice on sleepless nights when the shadows seemed filled with nightmare forms and phantoms, Ghosts from yesterday.You've heard my voice and you've had to listen.  Even as Carolyn had to listen lying awake last night and staring into the darkness.  Living again the past, one scene etched indelibly in her mind."

Summary: Carolyn Kramer has shot her former husband Bill Walker and is now being tried for his murder.  She waits in her jail cell while the jury deliberates,  She is pregnant, and envisions "a lifetime in prison" and her child being born there.  Then a matron comes into her cell to take her to court, telling her "The jury has reached a verdict."  The jurors file in and the judge orders Carolyn to rise and face them.  What will the verdict be?

Conclusion: "Carolyn, standing alone.  But not alone, for the past is her companion.  The past who walks with all of us as we seek our right to happiness."  Then closing theme music.

Note: The sound quality is a little tinny, but that could be due in part to the frequent echoing of The Voice of Fate in Carolyn's thoughts.  Overall, a good encode.  




--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Numbers 39 and 40

Larry Maupin
 

XXXIX,. Program: Perry Mason

Broadcast Date: 1950 (day and month not specified).

Sponsor: Tide

Suggested Episode Title: "Walter Bott Awaits His Arrest"

Opening: Theme music. Then a commercial for Tide.

Summary: Lieutenant Tragg and other police officers are on their way to Walter Bott's apartment to arrest him while he sits "methodically playing the piano."  Dr. Leslie Bruce (a man) comes to see Walter, and Bott's attorney Joseph Camp is also there.  Dr. Bruce has brought Walter two tablets in "a small green vial" which he says, "if taken with water will accomplish the desired effect."   The doctor leaves, and soon thereafter Bott receives a call from downstairs saying that the police are there with a warrant.  Bott calmly replies "No no no, don't try to stop them.  I want to see them."

Conclusion: Walter says "We'll soon see how my scheme works Joseph.  Yes, they're outside with a warrant."  Then a commercial for Tide, then theme music.  Then "This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System."

Notes: (1) Another exciting and well written episode.  I did not think this serial was very good, but the two episodes with Walter Bott dated 1950 are excellent (in the prior episode the name sounded like "Bock", but in this one both Della and the announcer pronounce it "Bott").  In any event Walter Bott is a cool character and a worthy adversary for Perry and the police; (2) A very good encode.


XL.  Program: Pretty Kitty Kelly

Broadcast Date: March 9, 1939

Sponsor: Wonder Bread; Hostess Cupcakes

Episode Title: "Kitty Is Found and Has Been Drugged" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme from "Kerry Dance", then "The bakers of Wonder Bread and Hostess Cupcakes present 'Pretty Kitty Kelly'."

Summary: Kitty and Bunny have been kidnapped and are being held at an abandoned Indian Village.  A rescue party finds Bunny, then Kitty.  The captors apparently intended to ship Kitty away in a box to a gentleman in "British Guiana, South America."  Later, someone sets fire to the shack in which Kitty is resting.

Conclusion: A commercial for Wonder Bread.  Tomorrow be sure to hear the next episode in the thrilling story of a beautiful golden-haired Irish girl, 'Pretty Kitty Kelly'."

Notes: The episode itself is not very good, but the theme music from "Kerry Dance" is heartbreakingly beautiful.  If you want to hear it, listen to the beginning and end of the episode on the OTRR Library website; (2) The audio quality is only fair during the dialogue, but fortunately the music comes through loud and clear.



--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 37 and 38

Larry Maupin
 

XXXVII. Program: Perry Mason

Broadcast Date: Friday, November 4, 1949

Sponsor: Tide

Episode Title: "The Honeymoon Murder Case: Part 2"

Opening: "Perry Mason, brought to you by Tide, Proctor&Gamble's new washday miracle."  Theme music, then a commercial for Tide.

Summary: Judge Newman's courtroom.  Lieutenant Tragg takes the stand and identifies a woman's glove with bloodstains on it that was found in connection with the murder of Wilfred Palmer.  It was discovered on the stairway leading to Palmer's apartment.  The defense admits that Martha Smith owns the glove.  Then the prosecution calls Alice Whitlock to the stand.  She was a neighbor of Palmer's. and testifies that she saw Martha Smith "coming out of Wilfred Palmer's apartment about two minutes after he was murdered."

Conclusion: "Well, there it is.  A flat identification that puts Martha right on the scene immediately after the murder was committed.  But, Perry Mason, if you go after Alice Whitlock too hard, if you begin to shake her story, you yourself, Perry, are going to be in jeopardy.  As we shall learn.  Join us Monday next, won't you?"  Then another commercial for Tide.  Then "This is the Columbia Broadcasting System."

Note: (1) Some of the characters' names sound different than in the episode on November 3, 1949.  The encode is very good, so I think this may be due to a lack of distinct articulation by the actors.  Perhaps someone with more acute hearing would be able to distinguish "Alan" from "Alice" and "Farmer" from "Palmer" better than I can.


XXXVIII. Program Title: Perry Mason

Broadcast Date: 1950 (day and month not specified)

Sponsor: Tide

Suggested Episode Title: "The Double"

Opening: Music, then a commercial for Tide.

Summary: The first scene is Lieutenant Tragg's office.  Perry and Della pay Tragg a visit to discuss the impending arrest of Walter Bock for murder.  Helen Henderson will be the prosecution's star witness.  The three are concerned that Bock may try to have Helen killed on her way to the courtroom. 

In the second scene, Walter Bock's attorney brings a woman named "Marilyn Irma Schneider, Ph.D." to see him.  Dr. Schneider is an experimental psychologist.  At first Bock tells her that he wants to "create a double" of an existing person.  Later, he seems to amend that by telling her that she will have a unique opportunity to completely remake a personality, to mold "living clay" into someone totally different.

Conclusion: "Was the clay Walter Bock and Dr. Schneider referred to as  Elise Scott the girl Walter Bock once molded and trained in the image of Helen Henderson?  So it's obvious that Perry Mason's precautions for his witness's safety are vitally important.  But will they be enough?"  Then another Tide commercial and theme music.  Then "This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System.

Notes: (1) A really good, suspenseful episode with an intriguing plot.  Walter Bock is not portrayed as a common thug, but rather as a cultured, articulate man who is interesting in his own right; (2) The audio quality is excellent. 


  


--
Larry Maupin

Listener Report Number 34

Larry Maupin
 

Program: Pepper Young's Family

Broadcast Date: Wednesday, September 7, 1937

Sponsor: Proctor&Gamble

Episode Title: "Peggy Talks To Frank Hastings" is the OTRR Library title for this episode.

Opening: Theme music, then "'Pepper Young's Family', the true to life story of your friends the Youngs.  Presented by Proctor&Gamble, the soaps for beautiful women."  Then a commercial for Camay.

Summary: Almost this entire episode consists of a conversation between Frank Hastings, a young man who has already been to college, and Peggy Young.  Frank knows that her father is now Mayor of Elmwood, and hopes that once she hears his story she will offer to speak to him on Frank's behalf.  It is morning in Elmwood, and Frank persuades Peggy to be late for high school and take a ride with him in his car.  Frank tells Peggy that he wants to get the commission to draw up the plans to build a new schoolhouse in Elmwood, which would get his fledgling career as a draftsman "off to a great start."  "If I could make the plans for that school, just have something to point to that I'd done, I think I'd be on my way."  Peggy replies, "It means a lot to you, doesn't it?"  Frank says "It means everything."

Conclusion: Theme music, then "What about Frank Hastings?  If a poor boy who had managed to make something of himself [and] to get an education spoke to you as he did to Peggy, what would be your reaction?  Does he have a terrible inferiority feeling or is he trying to put something over on Peggy?  What will Mr. Young say when Peggy asks him to do something for Frank?  Don't miss tomorrow's development."  Then another commercial for Camay.  Then "Be sure to listen tomorrow."

Notes: (1) The Camay commercial announces the deadline for entering a contest as "Saturday night, September 10th."  Thus we know that the broadcast date is Wednesday; (2) The audio quality is good throughout.


--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports 33 and 34

Larry Maupin
 

XXXIII. Program: Pepper Young's Family

Broadcast Date: Friday, August 10, 1945

Sponsor: Camay Beauty Soap:

Episode Title: "Pepper Plans To Marry Diana" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: A war bulletin, then a commercial for Camay.  "And now 'Pepper Young's Family', written by Elaine Carrington."

Summary: Early afternoon on a hot summer day at the home of Sam and Mary Young in Elmwood.  Daughter Peggy comes in while Mary is taking a nap, Mary comes downstairs, maid Hattie serves lemonade and cinnamon toast, and the  three women chat.  Peggy is pregnant and very happy; husband Carter treats her wonderfully.  Pepper plans to be married to Diana on Labor Day.  Mary reads a letter from Sam at their lake house which raises the question of whether Linda Benton might be the woman really meant for Pepper.

Conclusion: Another commercial for Camay, then theme music.  Then "Now this is Alan Kent inviting you to listen again on Monday."

Notes: (1) This episode is strikingly domestic, and gives a good flavor of what life must have been like in small town America in August of 1945.  Roosevelt had died in April, Truman was president, and the war was almost over; (2) The audio quality is fair.  Near the end, Sam seems to be pondering whether he has done something that will make it impossible for Diana to marry Pepper, but the words are too indistinct to understand.


--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports 35 and 36

Larry Maupin
 

XXXV. Program: Pepper Young's Family

Broadcast Date: December 22, 1955.  Recorded on KNBC-San Francisco.

Sponsor: Proctor&Gamble (Fluffo Shortening; Tide)

Episode Title: "Pepper Gets a Job As Publicity Man" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Music, A commercial for Fluffo.  "And now, 'Pepper Young's Family'."

Summary: "A little before nine o'clock" in the morning at Elmwood East oil well.  Pepper parks his car and enters the wooden shack that serves as the well's office.  Dave Wallace greets him and soon offers him a job doing public relations for the company.  Pepper accepts, and the two discuss various matters: how Pepper's sister Peggy is taking the death of her husband Carter Trent; the history of the well, the relationship of the Young family to the land on which it is located; the ordeal that led to Carter's death; the grave illness of Ivy Trent, Carter's mother, and her loss of the will to live; and Dr. Thomas's concern about Peggy.

Conclusion: A commercial for Tide.  Then "And now this is Bill Lazarre, inviting you to listen again tomorrow to 'Pepper Young's Family', brought to you by Proctor&Gamble's Fluffo, the fluffy rich shortening that's golden yellow.  Get Fluffo for a new kind of pies, cakes and fried foods.  Better looking, better tasting, better in every way than ever possible before.  This is the NBC Radio Network."

Notes: (1) This is the last episode of "Pepper Young's Family" on the disk, and it is mostly notable for the vast amount of background information it gives on much of what preceded it.  We even learn who Pepper decided to marry after a much earlier episode left that up in the air: (2) The audio quality is excellent throughout.


XXXVI. Program: Perry Mason

Broadcast Date: November 3, 1949

Sponsor: Tide

Episode Title: "Honeymoon Murder Case-Part 1" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: Theme music, then Perry Mason, defender of  human rights, champion of all those who seek justice."  Then a commercial for Tide.

Summary: Barbara Smith is on trial for murder.  Mr. Bissell, a Justice of the Peace from Meredith, testifies that he "married Barbara and Donald Smith about five hours after [Wilfred] Farmer was murdered."  He goes on to say that they seemed very frightened and that he remembers remarking to his wife, "I'll just bet there is something wrong with those two."  Then Lieutenant Tragg is called to the stand by Mr. Noble, the prosecutor.  Since it is late afternoon, however, court is adjourned before he can be located.  Tomorrow the prosecution's surprise witness Alan Whitlock will testify.

Conclusion: A Tide commercial.  Then "Perry Mason, the famous character created by Earl Stanley Gardner, is brought to you by Tide, Proctor&Gamble's amazing new discovery for your whole family wash."  Then "This is CBS, the Columbia Broadcasting System."

Note: The audio quality is mostly very good.  Only a few words are difficult to understand.



--
Larry Maupin

Listener Reports Number 31 and 32

Larry Maupin
 

XXXI. Program; Pepper Young's Family

Broadcast Date: 1941 (Day and month not listed)

Sponsor: Proctor&Gamble (Lava, White Naptha Soap)

Suggested Episode Title: The Youngs Prepare For Visitors

Opening: Theme music, then a commercial for White Naptha Soap.

Summary: The scene is the Young family home in Elmwood.  They are all a-flutter over the expected visit of Carter Trent's family from Chicago.  Peggy and Carter plan to be married after Peggy graduates from high school.  Hattie is preparing breakfast, and Mary hopes the fabulously wealthy Trents will be content with an afternoon tea (since they are not planning to stay overnight) with some scones, plum jelly, and cheese on toast.  They have not told Carter about their trip.

Pepper comes down for breakfast, then Peggy's classmate Edie pays a visit from next door.  Edie is "simply bursting in two" to see what the Trents look like. 

Closing: Theme music, then the announcer says "Uh-oh!  I feel trouble in my bones.  Well, a cat may look at a king, and maybe it's all right for Edie to take just one look at the Trents.  But when was Edie ever satisfied with just a look?"

Note: The audio quality is fair.


XXXII. Program: Pepper Young's Family

Broadcast Date: November 5, 1944

Sponsor: Camay

Episode Title: "Carter and Peggy Say Goodbye" according to the OTRR Library listing.

Opening: (1) Theme music, then a commercial for Camay.  "And now, 'Pepper Young's Family'."

Summary: This is an unremarkable episode that consists entirely of Peggy Young and Carter Trent discussing their love for each other and their future together.

Conclusion: "Carter's hand is in Peggy's as they walk along through the snow going home to the Young house.  And he realizes that he has everything in the world in having her.  That this is happiness.  This is what all men strive for.  This is it." Then another commercial for Camay.  Then "Pepper Young hears some surprising news from his mother.  Surprising and troubling.  Be sure to listen to 'Pepper Young's Family' tomorrow."  Finally, an admonition to listeners "not to waste soap during war time."  The announcer is Alan Kent.

Notes: (1) The OTRR Library episode title is inaccurate.  Peggy and Carter do not say goodbye in this episode, although they do discuss his leaving for a time in the near future; (2) The audio quality is excellent throughout.  


--
Larry Maupin