Date   

Re: Mexican Old Time Radio

Larry Gassman <larrygassman@...>
 

I think we have a program from Your Hit Parade in Spanish from either 1943 or 1944.

Larry

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of timbo514
Sent: Friday, January 15, 2021 7:13 AM
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Mexican Old Time Radio

 

I'm making some OTR MP3 players as sleep aids for a long term care facility.

 

Are any Mexican broadcasts of Spanish Language Old Time Radio shows available? What are the most popular? 


Museum of Broadcast Communications

Matthew Nunes
 

Hi all,

The Museum of Broadcast Communications posts about 10 OTR episodes every couple of months, and its worth checking out. Right now they have a Danny Kaye Show episode that I don't remember seeing before:


Best,
Matthew




Mexican Old Time Radio

timbo514
 

I'm making some OTR MP3 players as sleep aids for a long term care facility.

Are any Mexican broadcasts of Spanish Language Old Time Radio shows available? What are the most popular? 


Re: radio stations birthday shows

Larry Gassman <larrygassman@...>
 

I have several.

If you have date corrections, sound upgrades or other examples, I’d be interested in hearing them.

I think I also have one from WMCA, but it isn’t digitized yet.

 

AT&T’s 50th anniversary from 03/05/1935.

ABC: Return to Studio 1-A 11/15/1970.

Associated Press:  90 years of News 12/25/1938 90th anniversary of the Associated Press.

Associated Press 100 Years of News 05/23/1948 Associated Press.

CBS Radio At 50 09/18/1977.

Columbia Square CBS Studios Opening 04/30/1938.

Remembering Columbia Square 08/11/2005. Farewell To Columbia Square heard from 10 to 11 PM. KNX Aircheck with coverage after the program.

Remembering Columbia Square An Homage to a Palace of Broadcasting 07/04/2007.

A Birthday Bonanza 09/-10/1955 was the 35th Anniversary of KNX Los Angeles. This is a condensed version of that 18 hour program.

KDKA 50 Years of Broadcasting 11/02/1970

Historical discussion of radio on its 50th anniversary.

KFI special 50th Anniversary 04/16/1972 produced by Frank Bresee

Armed Forces Network 20th Anniversary 1963.

KQW 36th Anniversary 11/10/1945 Introduced by Engineer Paul Smith.

NBC 7th Anniversary Program 11/15/1933 (Incomplete first 7 minutes)

NBC 15th Anniversary 11/15/1941

NBC 25th Anniversary 11/xx/1951 Our Silver Jubilee. Fair sound.

NBC 30th Anniversary Program 12/06/1956. Is that date correct?

NBC First Fabulous Fifty Programs November 1976. Five parts.

NBC Radio's Kraft-radio Reunion 02/12/1978. Kraft's 75th anniversary.

NBC Radio's Summer Radio Picnic with the Kraft Family 06/24/1979.

WBZ's 60 Anniversary 09/19/1981 in 6 parts.

Radio’s 25th Birthday 09/29/1945

WJR, 50 Fabulous Years Of Broadcasting 05/04/1972.

WKBF Dedicatory Special 08/31/1933\

Through The Years 03/02/1947 the 25th Anniversary of WLW Cincinnati.

WLW, Cincinnati Radio, The Nation's Station 1921-1941 Leonard Maltin Hosts

I also have Volume 2.

WMAQ 25th Anniversary Salute 04/13/1947.

WOR'S 65th Anniversary. First heard 02-22-22. Recorded in February 1987.

WREC at 50. Memphis Tennessee. Early Radio Pioneer Hoyt B. Wooten and His Legendary Station. 09/22/1972.

WRVA Richmond Virginia celebrates it's 50th birthday. 11/02/1975.

WSYR New York. 09/-xx/1962 40th anniversary.

WTIC 35th anniversary 02/10/1960 in 2 parts .

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Walden Hughes
Sent: Friday, January 15, 2021 3:17 AM
To: OldTimeRadioResearchers@groups.io
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] radio stations birthday shows

 

Hi Everybody,

 

I would like to find copies of different radio stations birthday shows.   For example we have KFI 12 hour special from 4-16-72.  Does any one have such broadcast for other stations.  For example KOA out of Denver when they celebrated there 50s.  WBZ out of Boston for a week celebrated there birthday in 1971.  WOR out of New York.  Take care,

 

Walden


radio stations birthday shows

Walden Hughes
 

Hi Everybody,

 

I would like to find copies of different radio stations birthday shows.   For example we have KFI 12 hour special from 4-16-72.  Does any one have such broadcast for other stations.  For example KOA out of Denver when they celebrated there 50s.  WBZ out of Boston for a week celebrated there birthday in 1971.  WOR out of New York.  Take care,

 

Walden


Re: Sears radio Theater

Richard Davenport
 

From my references...

The General Mills Radio Adventure Theater was an anthology radio drama series with Tom Bosley as host, which aired on the CBS Radio Network in 1977. Himan Brown, already producing the CBS Radio Mystery Theater for the network, added this twice-weekly (Saturdays and Sundays) anthology radio drama series to his workload in 1977. It usually aired on weekends, beginning in February 1977 and continuing through the end of January 1978, on CBS radio affiliates which carried it.

General Mills was looking for a means of reaching children that would be less expensive than television advertising. Brown and CBS were willing to experiment with a series aimed at younger listeners, reaching that audience through ads in comic books. Apart from Christian or other religious broadcasting, this may have been the only nationwide attempt in the U.S. in the 1970s to air such a series. General Mills did not continue as sponsor after the 52 episodes had first aired over the first 26 weekends (February 1977 through July 1977), and the series (52 shows) was then repeated over the next 26 weekends (August 1977 through the end of January 1978), as The CBS Radio Adventure Theater, with a variety of other sponsors.



Labor ipse voluptas


On Monday, January 11, 2021, 3:22:07 AM CST, Walden Hughes <waldenhughes@...> wrote:


Two different shows, Highman Brown produce the one you are recalling for CBS,

 

Walden

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 7:45 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Sears radio Theater

 

There was also a General Mills Adventure Theater (ca. 1977 or 1978) or something along those lines, but it also had another name. Was it the same series as Mutual Radio Theater?
Ryan


Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Larry Maupin
 

Michael, that is a great story, "like the full moon rising," to quote a poet, in all its wealth of detail.  I hope having such a cool job helped you get dates with some of those California girls!

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday January 10 2021 8:31:27PM
Subject: Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Larry,

 

KUCI is the campus radio station of the University of California at Irvine. I had a show playing “old time radio” or should we say “vintage radio broadcasts”. I was on the air from May, 1969 until I left the university with a Master’s degree in Physics and a secondary teaching credential in June, 1976. I was on the air from 6 to 9PM for most of my tenure. I had an afternoon show from May through June, 1969 then graduated to Sunday nights when the station resumed broadcasting in September, 1969.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 5:15 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Michael, it is good to see the dialogue between you and Allan on the subject of '70s radio.  People seem to be paying large amounts these days for first generation reels, so it must have been nice getting yours at no cost.  I would like to know where KUCI is located if you care to post it.  Few things are as pleasantly nostalgic to me as remembering the call letters and locations of radio stations that have had an influence on my life or the lives of others.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday January 10 2021 6:01:01PM
Subject: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

“The Third Tower of Inverness” was actually “The Fourth Tower of Inverness”. I even remember airing that series while working at KUCI in the 70s. I still have the 1st generation reels the station received. No one there wanted them.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Allan Foster via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 12:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Boy, if somebody tries this looking at radio of the 1970's they'll have a real job on their hands.  Besides those shows already mentioned, there are all the shows written and produced by ZBS.  The Jack Flanders series, such as Moon Over Morocco, The Third Tower of Inverness, were produced throughout the 70's and into the 80's.  Plus radio shows like Chicken Man.  In the 80's ZBS produced the Ruby, the Galactic Gumshoe shows.  I"m pretty sure ZBS is still producing shows.  I don't think most here would lump them in with OTR, but they were definitely influenced by OTR but modernized.  They were/are legitimate radio theater though, and I thought very well written and produced.  I always lumped them in with NTR myself.

 

The beauty of writing a "taxonomy" article about a non-sciece subject is that the author gets to draw all the lines and set all the labels himself or herself.  That's freedom!

 

Allan

 

On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 2:13:56 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Sears radio Theater

Walden Hughes
 

Two different shows, Highman Brown produce the one you are recalling for CBS,

 

Walden

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 7:45 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Sears radio Theater

 

There was also a General Mills Adventure Theater (ca. 1977 or 1978) or something along those lines, but it also had another name. Was it the same series as Mutual Radio Theater?
Ryan


Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Michael Hingson
 

Larry,

 

KUCI is the campus radio station of the University of California at Irvine. I had a show playing “old time radio” or should we say “vintage radio broadcasts”. I was on the air from May, 1969 until I left the university with a Master’s degree in Physics and a secondary teaching credential in June, 1976. I was on the air from 6 to 9PM for most of my tenure. I had an afternoon show from May through June, 1969 then graduated to Sunday nights when the station resumed broadcasting in September, 1969.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 5:15 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Michael, it is good to see the dialogue between you and Allan on the subject of '70s radio.  People seem to be paying large amounts these days for first generation reels, so it must have been nice getting yours at no cost.  I would like to know where KUCI is located if you care to post it.  Few things are as pleasantly nostalgic to me as remembering the call letters and locations of radio stations that have had an influence on my life or the lives of others.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday January 10 2021 6:01:01PM
Subject: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

“The Third Tower of Inverness” was actually “The Fourth Tower of Inverness”. I even remember airing that series while working at KUCI in the 70s. I still have the 1st generation reels the station received. No one there wanted them.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Allan Foster via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 12:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Boy, if somebody tries this looking at radio of the 1970's they'll have a real job on their hands.  Besides those shows already mentioned, there are all the shows written and produced by ZBS.  The Jack Flanders series, such as Moon Over Morocco, The Third Tower of Inverness, were produced throughout the 70's and into the 80's.  Plus radio shows like Chicken Man.  In the 80's ZBS produced the Ruby, the Galactic Gumshoe shows.  I"m pretty sure ZBS is still producing shows.  I don't think most here would lump them in with OTR, but they were definitely influenced by OTR but modernized.  They were/are legitimate radio theater though, and I thought very well written and produced.  I always lumped them in with NTR myself.

 

The beauty of writing a "taxonomy" article about a non-sciece subject is that the author gets to draw all the lines and set all the labels himself or herself.  That's freedom!

 

Allan

 

On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 2:13:56 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Larry Maupin
 

Michael, it is good to see the dialogue between you and Allan on the subject of '70s radio.  People seem to be paying large amounts these days for first generation reels, so it must have been nice getting yours at no cost.  I would like to know where KUCI is located if you care to post it.  Few things are as pleasantly nostalgic to me as remembering the call letters and locations of radio stations that have had an influence on my life or the lives of others.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday January 10 2021 6:01:01PM
Subject: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

“The Third Tower of Inverness” was actually “The Fourth Tower of Inverness”. I even remember airing that series while working at KUCI in the 70s. I still have the 1st generation reels the station received. No one there wanted them.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Allan Foster via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 12:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Boy, if somebody tries this looking at radio of the 1970's they'll have a real job on their hands.  Besides those shows already mentioned, there are all the shows written and produced by ZBS.  The Jack Flanders series, such as Moon Over Morocco, The Third Tower of Inverness, were produced throughout the 70's and into the 80's.  Plus radio shows like Chicken Man.  In the 80's ZBS produced the Ruby, the Galactic Gumshoe shows.  I"m pretty sure ZBS is still producing shows.  I don't think most here would lump them in with OTR, but they were definitely influenced by OTR but modernized.  They were/are legitimate radio theater though, and I thought very well written and produced.  I always lumped them in with NTR myself.

 

The beauty of writing a "taxonomy" article about a non-sciece subject is that the author gets to draw all the lines and set all the labels himself or herself.  That's freedom!

 

Allan

 

On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 2:13:56 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Michael Hingson
 

Me too..

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Allan Foster via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 4:37 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

No!  I really wanted to meet Little Frieda, Far-Seeing Art, and Lady Jowls too, but the were nowhere to be found.  Meatball Fulton developed great characters.  Now I’m going to have to dig it out and listen again.

 

Allan


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Sunday, January 10, 2021, 6:26 PM, Michael Hingson <mike@...> wrote:

The tower only comes out sometimes. Did you meet the Lady Vampira?

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Allan Foster via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 3:22 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Oh man, you're right!  Can't believe I got that wrong, I've listened to the series several times over the years.  I was in Inverness a year or so ago and kept looking for the house with the towers, but couldn't find it.  :-)

 

Thanks for the correction,

 

Allan

 

On Sunday, January 10, 2021, 5:01:01 PM CST, Michael Hingson <mike@...> wrote:

 

 

“The Third Tower of Inverness” was actually “The Fourth Tower of Inverness”. I even remember airing that series while working at KUCI in the 70s. I still have the 1st generation reels the station received. No one there wanted them.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 


Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Allan Foster
 

No!  I really wanted to meet Little Frieda, Far-Seeing Art, and Lady Jowls too, but the were nowhere to be found.  Meatball Fulton developed great characters.  Now I’m going to have to dig it out and listen again.

On Sunday, January 10, 2021, 6:26 PM, Michael Hingson <mike@...> wrote:

The tower only comes out sometimes. Did you meet the Lady Vampira?

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Allan Foster via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 3:22 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Oh man, you're right!  Can't believe I got that wrong, I've listened to the series several times over the years.  I was in Inverness a year or so ago and kept looking for the house with the towers, but couldn't find it.  :-)

 

Thanks for the correction,

 

Allan

 

On Sunday, January 10, 2021, 5:01:01 PM CST, Michael Hingson <mike@...> wrote:

 

 

“The Third Tower of Inverness” was actually “The Fourth Tower of Inverness”. I even remember airing that series while working at KUCI in the 70s. I still have the 1st generation reels the station received. No one there wanted them.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 


Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Michael Hingson
 

The tower only comes out sometimes. Did you meet the Lady Vampira?

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Allan Foster via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 3:22 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Oh man, you're right!  Can't believe I got that wrong, I've listened to the series several times over the years.  I was in Inverness a year or so ago and kept looking for the house with the towers, but couldn't find it.  :-)

 

Thanks for the correction,

 

Allan

 

On Sunday, January 10, 2021, 5:01:01 PM CST, Michael Hingson <mike@...> wrote:

 

 

“The Third Tower of Inverness” was actually “The Fourth Tower of Inverness”. I even remember airing that series while working at KUCI in the 70s. I still have the 1st generation reels the station received. No one there wanted them.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 


Re: correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Allan Foster
 

Oh man, you're right!  Can't believe I got that wrong, I've listened to the series several times over the years.  I was in Inverness a year or so ago and kept looking for the house with the towers, but couldn't find it.  :-)

Thanks for the correction,

Allan

On Sunday, January 10, 2021, 5:01:01 PM CST, Michael Hingson <mike@...> wrote:


“The Third Tower of Inverness” was actually “The Fourth Tower of Inverness”. I even remember airing that series while working at KUCI in the 70s. I still have the 1st generation reels the station received. No one there wanted them.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson



correction: RE: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Michael Hingson
 

“The Third Tower of Inverness” was actually “The Fourth Tower of Inverness”. I even remember airing that series while working at KUCI in the 70s. I still have the 1st generation reels the station received. No one there wanted them.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Allan Foster via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 12:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Boy, if somebody tries this looking at radio of the 1970's they'll have a real job on their hands.  Besides those shows already mentioned, there are all the shows written and produced by ZBS.  The Jack Flanders series, such as Moon Over Morocco, The Third Tower of Inverness, were produced throughout the 70's and into the 80's.  Plus radio shows like Chicken Man.  In the 80's ZBS produced the Ruby, the Galactic Gumshoe shows.  I"m pretty sure ZBS is still producing shows.  I don't think most here would lump them in with OTR, but they were definitely influenced by OTR but modernized.  They were/are legitimate radio theater though, and I thought very well written and produced.  I always lumped them in with NTR myself.

 

The beauty of writing a "taxonomy" article about a non-sciece subject is that the author gets to draw all the lines and set all the labels himself or herself.  That's freedom!

 

Allan

 

On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 2:13:56 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Michael Hingson
 

Larry,

 

Agreed. It still is all part of radio.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 12:14 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Michael Hingson
 

Thanks.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 11:45 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Sherlock Holmes:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/h48gmpsypic5hld/AADsBDZckWPqsFjoTOPD6ts2a?dl=0

 

Squad Cars:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/mqqjfbo2f42kz9f/AAAaOU1kxErYKo7DGom8q9noa?dl=0

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 6:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Sure. I’m not sure what OTTR already has but when I get back from dinner tonight I’ll make DropBox shares for Sherlock Holmes and Squad Cars.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Hingson
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 7:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott,

 

Might you be willing to share Springbok?

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

I have 210 BBC Sherlock Holmes episodes ranging from 1945 to 2010. Would we consider the 65 that are prior to 1962 OTR? Or is the BBC just BBC? And I have 47 Springbok episodes from the 80’s. You can’t not like Springbok (Squad Cars!) but you just can’t call it OTR. I kind-of think OTR is an American thing. Fun to talk about.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 9:26 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott, I have dozens of BBC dramas on cassettes, and most of the ones I have listened to are very good.  I do not think that any are in the OTRR Library collection, probably because most people do not consider them to be old-time radio.

 

Thank you for your comments about The Little Things in Life.  It seems that you might think it qualifies as an old-time radio series.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday January 8 2021 9:54:19AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Although not American, the BBC never stopped doing drama. The CBC continued into the 1990's at least, and South Africa and Australia were doing OTR type shows into the 1980's. A treasure trove is out there, waiting to be listened to. More drama, adventure and comedy than anyone could listen to in two lifetimes. And most, if not all of it top quality productions.

S


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Scott Mahan
 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 6:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Sure. I’m not sure what OTTR already has but when I get back from dinner tonight I’ll make DropBox shares for Sherlock Holmes and Squad Cars.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Hingson
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 7:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott,

 

Might you be willing to share Springbok?

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

I have 210 BBC Sherlock Holmes episodes ranging from 1945 to 2010. Would we consider the 65 that are prior to 1962 OTR? Or is the BBC just BBC? And I have 47 Springbok episodes from the 80’s. You can’t not like Springbok (Squad Cars!) but you just can’t call it OTR. I kind-of think OTR is an American thing. Fun to talk about.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 9:26 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott, I have dozens of BBC dramas on cassettes, and most of the ones I have listened to are very good.  I do not think that any are in the OTRR Library collection, probably because most people do not consider them to be old-time radio.

 

Thank you for your comments about The Little Things in Life.  It seems that you might think it qualifies as an old-time radio series.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday January 8 2021 9:54:19AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Although not American, the BBC never stopped doing drama. The CBC continued into the 1990's at least, and South Africa and Australia were doing OTR type shows into the 1980's. A treasure trove is out there, waiting to be listened to. More drama, adventure and comedy than anyone could listen to in two lifetimes. And most, if not all of it top quality productions.

S


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Sears radio Theater

Larry Gassman <larrygassman@...>
 

No, they were two distinct and different series.

General Mills Adventure Theater was done from New York and produced by Himan Brown.

Sears and Mutual were done from Hollywood and produced by Elliott Lewis.

 

Larry

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, January 10, 2021 7:45 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Sears radio Theater

 

There was also a General Mills Adventure Theater (ca. 1977 or 1978) or something along those lines, but it also had another name. Was it the same series as Mutual Radio Theater?
Ryan


Re: Sears radio Theater

Larry Maupin
 

I don't remember either of those Ryan.  But I do think there could be a number of articles and perhaps even a book written on "The Silver Age of Radio."  If I write an article it will just be confined to the four series that Walden mentioned in his post on Friday, but if we define The Silver Age as perhaps 1963 to 1979 there is a lot of room for many publications on the programs during those years that reflect the spirit of old-time radio.  I don't think Chicken Man would make my list though.  You have the draw the line somewhere!

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday January 10 2021 10:45:01AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Sears radio Theater

There was also a General Mills Adventure Theater (ca. 1977 or 1978) or something along those lines, but it also had another name. Was it the same series as Mutual Radio Theater?
Ryan

--
Larry Maupin

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