Date   

Re: The Sealed Book

Litsey, Alan
 

Thank you, Jim for sharing these awesome shows. Alan 


On Apr 27, 2021, at 9:11 PM, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:

One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file, it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of past events come to mind.

This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.

For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings much like The Whistler. Some may not like the overdramatic announcer, but he grows on you.

The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes of really bad organ music (noise). 

However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k

I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and tedious breaks in the story line.

jj


Re: The Sealed Book

jackies@tularosa.net
 

Dear Jim:

I did not mean to imply that you had taken the commercials off I thought someone else had done that at some time. I did not mean to hurt you. I have had some in the past that I picked up at yard sales (in the day of cassettes) where people had taken and just removed the commercials because they did not like them. As a person who is a true preservationist I would never ever think you would do that yourself. I know how highly you consider your work and I thank you for that.

Sincerely

Jackie Schlageter


Re: The Sealed Book

Jim Jones
 

Jackie
 
Please read my entire post! I can assure you that NO COMMERCIALS WERE REMOVED. The shows that are presently  in circulation are studio productions. They did not have commercials. Instead of commercials they interjected one and a half to two minutes of organ droning, 4 times during the 1/2 hour show. This is where stations would later substitute commercials. These long periods of  impromptu organ recitals disrupt the flow of the story line and add no entertainment value. They are merely a spacer, a time filler.
 
If you prefer to listen to the originals with the 5 minutes of additional organ noise, please feel free to. No one is asking you not to. These shows are readily available all over the internet., youtube, archive.org, dc++, OTRR library... However, I took the time to edit and provided this version for any OTR listener who would like to enjoy these highly entertaining  well produced stories without the unproductive unnecessary noise interruptions.  As you can see by previous posts, many enthusiasts do appreciate the quality of this particular show.
 
Please listen to both versions before making such an uninformed criticism.
 
Long time OTR fan
 
JJ
 

-----Original Message-----
From: jackies@... via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2021 1:31 PM
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] The Sealed Book
 
I can't understand why people want to take out the commercials out of
the OTR shows because I consider them part of the shows.  I know that I
don't agree with some of the shows but that it what they were when the
shows were first played.
Jackie
> One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since
> there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and
> forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file,
> it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of
> past events come to mind.
>
> This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed
> Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but
> when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.
>
> For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a
> well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings
> much like The Whistler. Some may not like the over dramatic announcer,
> but he grows on you.
>
> The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG
> interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials
> are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes
> of really bad organ music (noise).
>
> However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ
> interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it
> for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted
> these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone
> would like them. The link is:
> https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k
>
> I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and
> tedious breaks in the story line.
 
 
 


Re: The Sealed Book

K & J Hammel
 

Thanks Rick for the suggestion. Fortunately much of what it has been difficult to get off the CDs is fairly easy to recover from other sources, so at this point I’m not missing anything urgent. But it’s good to know that there are alternatives if I run into a situation where I really would like to recover something.

Kathy


On Apr 27, 2021, at 11:42 AM, Richard Davenport <klingon1@...> wrote:

Kathy just because a CD is scratched doesn’t mean it’s not recoverable. They have devices that work the same way that clean up audio media CDs work on data CDs. Pop over to Amazon and pick you up one they’re cheap but it might save your data.

Rick


On Apr 27, 2021, at 1:08 PM, Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims@...> wrote:

Right on! That show and The Strange Dr. Weird have many scripts that are really from the Mysterious Traveler Arena. Robert Arthur and David Kogan were such a remarkable team. Shows are gems to be sure


On Tue, Apr 27, 2021 at 9:14 AM, K & J Hammel
<haml@...> wrote:
Thanks, Jim.

Quite a few of my old shows are on ancient CDs and some of those have gone bad, so it's always nice to grab some replacements that I can store on more reliable media.

Kathy

On Tuesday, April 27, 2021, 08:11:54 AM PDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:


One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file, it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of past events come to mind.

This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.

For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings much like The Whistler. Some may not like the overdramatic announcer, but he grows on you.

The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes of really bad organ music (noise). 

However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k

I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and tedious breaks in the story line.

jj


Re: The Sealed Book

jackies@tularosa.net
 

I can't understand why people want to take out the commercials out of the OTR shows because I consider them part of the shows. I know that I don't agree with some of the shows but that it what they were when the shows were first played.
Jackie

One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since
there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and
forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file,
it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of
past events come to mind.
This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed
Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but
when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.
For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a
well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings
much like The Whistler. Some may not like the over dramatic announcer,
but he grows on you.
The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG
interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials
are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes
of really bad organ music (noise).
However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ
interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it
for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted
these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone
would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k
I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and
tedious breaks in the story line.


Re: Sky Pilot

jackies@tularosa.net
 

Hi Joe"

In the 90's we were able to get a California Station where we lived at that time and I remember them playing that occasionally. They only played a couple a couple programs every Saturday night and they rotated what they played so there were not of a lot repeat programs. I don't know if they played them at other times because we were only able to get them at night on Saturday.
I don't know if this helps you any but that was the program that got my son hooked on OTR.

Jackie

Hello Researchers,

Has anyone heard of a program called Sky Pilot? It appears to have
been a local creation of KPRC radio, in Houston, in the '40s, back
when it was an NBC affiliate. I've seen the transcriptions, glass
based and laminate all over the container for many of the discs.
Nothing turned up online and no one at the library had any info.
Just thought someone might have heard of it. I haven't looked in the
local newspapers of the era.
Thanks,
Joe Salerno


Re: The Sealed Book

Richard Davenport
 

Kathy just because a CD is scratched doesn’t mean it’s not recoverable. They have devices that work the same way that clean up audio media CDs work on data CDs. Pop over to Amazon and pick you up one they’re cheap but it might save your data.

Rick


On Apr 27, 2021, at 1:08 PM, Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims@...> wrote:

Right on! That show and The Strange Dr. Weird have many scripts that are really from the Mysterious Traveler Arena. Robert Arthur and David Kogan were such a remarkable team. Shows are gems to be sure


On Tue, Apr 27, 2021 at 9:14 AM, K & J Hammel
<haml@...> wrote:
Thanks, Jim.

Quite a few of my old shows are on ancient CDs and some of those have gone bad, so it's always nice to grab some replacements that I can store on more reliable media.

Kathy

On Tuesday, April 27, 2021, 08:11:54 AM PDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:


One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file, it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of past events come to mind.

This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.

For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings much like The Whistler. Some may not like the overdramatic announcer, but he grows on you.

The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes of really bad organ music (noise). 

However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k

I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and tedious breaks in the story line.

jj


Re: The Sealed Book

Mike Thomas
 

Right on! That show and The Strange Dr. Weird have many scripts that are really from the Mysterious Traveler Arena. Robert Arthur and David Kogan were such a remarkable team. Shows are gems to be sure


On Tue, Apr 27, 2021 at 9:14 AM, K & J Hammel
<haml@...> wrote:
Thanks, Jim.

Quite a few of my old shows are on ancient CDs and some of those have gone bad, so it's always nice to grab some replacements that I can store on more reliable media.

Kathy

On Tuesday, April 27, 2021, 08:11:54 AM PDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:


One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file, it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of past events come to mind.

This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.

For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings much like The Whistler. Some may not like the overdramatic announcer, but he grows on you.

The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes of really bad organ music (noise). 

However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k

I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and tedious breaks in the story line.

jj


Which is Better Radio Version or Movie Version or Maybe Both?

Wild West Designs
 

The oscars having just happened and my thinking directly about Academy Award Theatre (then Lux), I have to wonder what every one thinks about the radio show versions of movies?

Sure, there are time differences that affect amount of action versus quick exposition (or total removal), and then everyone imagines the scenes differently versus whats on screen.

But in general, good or bad to have radio adaptations? Do the make the grade in still delivering the story considering the given constraints?

For instance, I am a huge fan of the movies of Red River and Maltese Falcon.  I enjoyed both Lux and AAT version of the respective movies.  Both for the most part had the same principle performers (which is really a plus in my mind), but I enjoyed Lux a little bit more.  I'm not sure if it's just due to the longer time format versus AAT or maybe the production was just better or both?

What are y'all thoughts on this?  Makes no never mind, better to have one over the other (I'm sure the preference of one over the other may affect this as well) or can they both be treated separately and thus be enjoyed (I have to wonder if it's the last bit, does it help or hurt to have the original performers in this regard?).

I was just wanting to get y'alls thoughts on it.

I do definitely prefer when they are designed for the respective medium.  I do have a set of R/B SH movies with just audio and that is nowhere near the same.  So I do think that to do it right, they have to be produced for the respective media, not made in one and shoehorned to fit into another.  But knowing/liking one version over the other, does that ruin your enjoyment of the other?  Either your visual doesn't line up with theirs (or maybe if going from movie to audio, was your vision corrupted by theirs?) or too much is edited out etc.

--

Evan West

otrDB and otrDBPlayer programs using Qt framework


Re: The Sealed Book

K & J Hammel
 

Thanks, Jim.

Quite a few of my old shows are on ancient CDs and some of those have gone bad, so it's always nice to grab some replacements that I can store on more reliable media.

Kathy

On Tuesday, April 27, 2021, 08:11:54 AM PDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:


One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file, it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of past events come to mind.

This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.

For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings much like The Whistler. Some may not like the overdramatic announcer, but he grows on you.

The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes of really bad organ music (noise). 

However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k

I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and tedious breaks in the story line.

jj


Re: The Sealed Book

Brian Allen
 

I will check them out.  Thanks

On Tuesday, April 27, 2021, 11:11:46 AM EDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:


One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file, it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of past events come to mind.

This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.

For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings much like The Whistler. Some may not like the overdramatic announcer, but he grows on you.

The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes of really bad organ music (noise). 

However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k

I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and tedious breaks in the story line.

jj


Re: The Sealed Book

Gordon Johansen
 

Thanks Jim.  I haven't listened to this one in a long time either. Loud music is one of the things that stops me from listening to a show as I fall asleep.

Gord

Jim Jones wrote on 4/27/21 9:11 AM:

One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file, it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of past events come to mind.

This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.

For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings much like The Whistler. Some may not like the overdramatic announcer, but he grows on you.

The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes of really bad organ music (noise). 

However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k

I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and tedious breaks in the story line.

jj

--
Sent from Postbox


The Sealed Book

Jim Jones
 

One of the great things about OTR is rediscovering an old show. Since there are so many shows to listen to, it is easy to file away and forget an old favorite. When you do pull up that old forgotten file, it is like meeting an old friend on the street. Pleasant memories of past events come to mind.

This is the experience I had when, this week, I came across The Sealed Book. I have not listened to that series in probably 15-20 years, but when I started the series some old and pleasant memories came to mind.

For those who have not listened to The Sealed Book, it is a well-written suspense show. Many of the episodes have surprise endings much like The Whistler. Some may not like the overdramatic announcer, but he grows on you.

The major downside of the existing shows are the LOOOONNNGGG interludes of organ music. Organ music is inserted where commercials are intended to be. These 4 commercial breaks contain over 5 minutes of really bad organ music (noise). 

However, I have fixed that problem by removing these unnecessary organ interludes. There is still plenty of organ music as the show uses it for background and emphasis, similar to Boston Blackie. I have posted these updated (and much more listenable) shows to the cloud if anyone would like them. The link is:
https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZAUF1XZ3RYk9r3vLKYx4Sc4vhPuG8yL347k

I hope everyone finds these shows more enjoyable without the long and tedious breaks in the story line.

jj


Re: For Preservation's Sake

mail@lokey.info
 

Harvey is alive and well and just as cantankerous as ever. I can send you his email address off-list of you want to get in touch with him. 

Larry

On Sun, Apr 25, 2021, 5:52 PM Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Wraith is Richard D.
Ko6BB is Phil A.

Now i have names to go with the familiar nicks.

I am pilgrim

Small world.

Anyone here know what happened to Harvey Markfield?



On Sun, Apr 25, 2021 at 3:40 PM, Mike Thomas via groups.io
<thomaspilgrims=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Corey, otrhub, Phil's place,  dew drop in

Those are perhaps the hubs that are easiest and most active.

Inside the membership of these three are other possibilities but are by invite only.

A fellow that goes by wildbill can get you into the first two. One of the moderators got me into the third.

I have found almost anything an otr ,old movie, old tv, or audio book would want


On Sun, Apr 25, 2021 at 10:40 AM, -
<dandunfee@...> wrote:
There was a sat/sun otr 3 hr. show on wpr that was removed entirely without explaning what was "offensive" ffor an entire historical genre; not just individuall examples
of what might bee"offensive".

'Wis. Public Radio drops old-time radio shows over racist, sexist content'



On Sun, 25 Apr 2021, Wild West Designs wrote:

> There has been one university radio station that did remove some radio
> broadcasts from their lineup (just one mind you, but the precedent has
> now been set).  Was it in Michigan, Wisconsin?  I'm wanting to say it
> was one of those and I think it was Amos and Andy in particular, at
> least what was cited if I'm remembering correctly, I have slept since
> then.  I think that was mentioned in the FB group last year.  I think it
> was last summer.
>
> Ease of access in this instance, is very much the concern with
> preservation.  To me, and I could be wrong about this, preservation is
> linked to ease of access.  If it is only available to a select view,
> then preservation loses it's meaning.  It's still preservation, but it
> has become distorted.  Corrupted if you will as it specifically applies
> to OTR.  Part of preservation (at least for me, and this may differ from
> others and that's fine) is apart of sharing.  Culture that was written
> for everyone, should be preserved and enjoyed by everyone (and there are
> different ways for past content to be "enjoyed" as well).  Even if it's
> in the past and as a culture we have moved past those norms (at least so
> I thought).  Now, if it is a culture of a small group, then yes, ease of
> access may be different then.  While we are a small, niche group doing
> preservation, what we are trying to preserve is a part of a country's
> culture, not just one tiny group's culture.  I hope that makes sense, I
> may still be totally off my rocker, but hopefully there appears to be
> some method to my madness.
>
> Hosting being able to enforce, is more reactive as they are dependent
> (at least right now) for people to report when they see things (and
> depending on where the hosting company is located), but I'm sure they
> can come up with some ToS violation to get it removed for a "valid"
> reason.  While doing a hosting outside the US may be a valid option, we
> would still have to worry about connecting to that outside server from
> within the US.  Still possible, but not quite as easy.
>
> You have to remember ebay removed the sale of those 6 "problematic" Dr
> Seuss books when listings were reported.  It appears no 1st sale
> doctrine applies there if it's "problematic" (as they were used books).
> So while, owner's of the IP may be able to limit future pressings etc,
> it going after what the 1st sale doctrine is supposed to allow for is
> something else (by the way, for those that buy digital goods, 1st sale
> doctrine (at least from what I can tell as a non lawyer) doesn't tend to
> apply even with downloaded digital goods (even less so with non
> downloaded goods, we have less rights with those)).
>
> Now, I will say this, I'm wildly risk adverse about some things, so even
> a small chance is no bueno in my book.  So take that into account as
> well.
>
> Evan
>
> On 2021-04-25 08:48 AM, Ryan Ellett via groups.io wrote:
>
> > I know people have mentioned Evan's point in the past, but I don't
> > remember if it was here or on the Facebook page. On the extremely tiny
> > chance (in my opinion) that all internet service providers decided they
> > would not host old-time radio web content, I think most hobbyists would
> > go on sharing content privately as has been done since the '50s and is
> > still being done. While making it available on our website or Internet
> > Archive or YouTube certainly expands the potential audience, it's not
> > necessary for any preservation purposes. Or we could find some hosting
> > service outside the United States.
> >
> > Practically speaking I don't see old-time radio disappearing from the
> > internet. Even universities and the Library of Congress feature
> > historical broadcasts. It'd be impossible for any hosting service to
> > enforce, it seems. You might see pressure to remove some of the
> > minstrel-type shows or even Amos n Andy but those shows are well
> > preserved in private collections and will not be in danger of
> > disappearing. Preservation is not connected to ease of public access,
> > as witnessed by all the material in library archive holdings.
> >
> > I may be misunderstanding Evan's concern but OTRR has over the years
> > removed material from our public library at the request of rights
> > holders and to avoid attracting unwanted attention in other cases, but
> > the material is still readily available should anyone want to hear it.
> >
> >
> > The Old Time Radio Researchers
> > "Saving the Past for the Future"
> >
> >
> > I am no way advocating a total free for all political discussion, but I
> > would certainly argue that some aspects do affect our efforts for
> > preservation and I think that they would be good to discuss.  If
> > nothing else, in order to make plans as to where to focus on
> > preservation if something is to be changed with availability.
> >
> > Evan
> >
> >
>
>
> Links:
> ------
> [5]
>
>
>
>
>
>

--
Dan d.
XR






Sky Pilot

not.serious@comcast.net
 

Hello Researchers,

Has anyone heard of a program called Sky Pilot? It appears to have been a local creation of KPRC radio, in Houston, in the '40s, back when it was an NBC affiliate. I've seen the transcriptions, glass based and laminate all over the container for many of the discs.

Nothing turned up online and no one at the library had any info.

Just thought someone might have heard of it. I haven't looked in the local newspapers of the era.

Thanks,

Joe Salerno


Re: For Preservation's Sake

Walden Hughes
 

I had contacted many places over the last few years about their radio archives.  Some of decided  to close and move it to other location.  We will see how UC Santa Barbara  will  handle the new radio archives when that open in a year or so from now.    I believe the best way to support  any research in OTR is to support the clubs like SPERDVAC.  Take care,

 

Walden

 

   

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Stepno
Sent: Monday, April 26, 2021 12:36 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] For Preservation's Sake

 

"Preservation," documentation and archiving of a half century of broadcast media is a noble cause, and I trust the Internet Archive and OTRR to keep doing that -- and making the results of their research more available to the public than is allowed within the constraints of academic libraries with limited funding for properly handling multimedia materials.

As this OTRR collector-community ages, perhaps members can identify institutions they recommend for inclusion in financial bequests (not just materials) to continue the work of preservation? Have any of the club newsletters had an article about that?

As for the threat of removal of shareable archived online materials, that sounds like culture-wars paranoia. Search the Internet Archive and I suspect you'll find a full political range of previously "burned books," from Marx to Hitler. 

We can't erase racism, white-supremacy and sexism in America by hiding the fact that our entertainment media long reflected those elements when they dominated the culture. Learning from history is one thing, but I can see how a public broadcaster might have difficulty providing a 21st century context for such programming on a regular basis.

I appreciate the Wisconsin argument about an education and public service focused (and listener-supported) radio station struggling to frame broadcasts that not only "preserved" the art of audio storytelling and entertainment... but also "preserved" the attitudes of decades when, for example, on-air authority figures were almost all white males, African-American characters were mostly comic and subservient, Asians were usually servants or evil enemies (whether Chinese houseboys, "Japs" in World War II or pulp-novel master-villains in adventure series), and women were too often secondary characters, victims, or "just homemakers" (with many wonderful exceptions, thanks to numerous fine female writers and actors).

I like to think that with more time, money and imagination a radio station could have managed the "contextualization" problem, but I never heard the Wisconsin attempts, and the article admits the program was "cobbled together" from the start. 

Here's a more detailed version of the Wisconsin public radio story... 

https://madison.com/ct/entertainment/city-life/citing-racist-and-sexist-material-wpr-cancels-old-time-radio-drama-after-31-years/article_4cf0f9dc-b3de-552b-99bb-7ed2e73f6427.html

An excerpt:

<<But Ideas Network director Sheryl Gasser said the change had been in the works for years, with both listeners and staff complaining about some of the content on the historic shows.

"Certainly, the current national conversation about race played a role in moving more quickly, but this is something we had been considering for several years," Gasser said in an interview via e-mail. "Our producers worked to vet content before it was broadcast, but given the pervasive sexism and racism in some productions it was very difficult to source programs that met our values."

 

 

Gasser said "Old Time Radio Drama" had already dropped several classic shows from its programming. There was also some discussion about recontextualizing the original shows to point out their objectionable content similar to what HBO MAX is doing, but in the end that didn't seem to work for a radio show.

"People typically tune in and out at different times.  Even if we created context for the broadcasts, there would be no guarantee that people would hear them."

-----------

To me, that last sentence is the strongest argument against simply rebroadcasting 80-year-old programming to a general audience with little or no discussion. Dial-spinners might tune-in mid-broadcast and hear a racist joke, laugh, and drive on.

But Web presentations of OTR are there for people who actively seek them out, and online has much more potential for "framing" broadcasts with introductions, comments, web page links, discussion forums, and collector groups. Those could provide just the "recontextualization" the Wisc programmer was talking about.  The "comment" functions at the Internet Archive and YouTube provide that capability, along with the ability to link to "context," especially history. 

First example that comes to mind, the Amos 'n' Andy at Wikipedia,  including some of Elizabeth McLeod's analysis and details like the early disagreement about the program between the African-American newspapers Pittsburgh Courier and Chicago Defender.  (Hmm. Maybe we could drop a link to that page into the OTRRLibrary folder of A&A episodes.)

Sorry for running on... mostly thinking outloud. Back to listening...

Bob in the Blue Ridge


Re: For Preservation's Sake

Wild West Designs
 

That tuning in and out is a valid concern (why I was thinking doing it several times, back from commercial break etc) would have helped.  Is it perfect, far from it.

Although I do have to wonder just how much longer traditional terrestrial radio is actually going to be a thing.  May be able to handle that better with different mediums that are coming out.

And even then, there is only so much that we can do, the question I would say is was the attempt reasonable?

What made me think of that was remembering what happened with people missing the intro to that infamous 1938 broadcast (not necessarily due to the few rare instances of legit panicking during the broadcast, but with how the broadcast was formatted (and I think also due to the lack of commercials, I don't think it was until later that MTotA had commercials (was it Campbell's I'm wanting to say?) and how that was only mentioned once to provide context.  Made for very effective drama though.  But I think that did spark some controversy due to how the story was formatted and lack of context.

Evan


On 2021-04-26 02:36 PM, Bob Stepno wrote:

"Preservation," documentation and archiving of a half century of broadcast media is a noble cause, and I trust the Internet Archive and OTRR to keep doing that -- and making the results of their research more available to the public than is allowed within the constraints of academic libraries with limited funding for properly handling multimedia materials.

As this OTRR collector-community ages, perhaps members can identify institutions they recommend for inclusion in financial bequests (not just materials) to continue the work of preservation? Have any of the club newsletters had an article about that?

As for the threat of removal of shareable archived online materials, that sounds like culture-wars paranoia. Search the Internet Archive and I suspect you'll find a full political range of previously "burned books," from Marx to Hitler. 

We can't erase racism, white-supremacy and sexism in America by hiding the fact that our entertainment media long reflected those elements when they dominated the culture. Learning from history is one thing, but I can see how a public broadcaster might have difficulty providing a 21st century context for such programming on a regular basis.

I appreciate the Wisconsin argument about an education and public service focused (and listener-supported) radio station struggling to frame broadcasts that not only "preserved" the art of audio storytelling and entertainment... but also "preserved" the attitudes of decades when, for example, on-air authority figures were almost all white males, African-American characters were mostly comic and subservient, Asians were usually servants or evil enemies (whether Chinese houseboys, "Japs" in World War II or pulp-novel master-villains in adventure series), and women were too often secondary characters, victims, or "just homemakers" (with many wonderful exceptions, thanks to numerous fine female writers and actors).

I like to think that with more time, money and imagination a radio station could have managed the "contextualization" problem, but I never heard the Wisconsin attempts, and the article admits the program was "cobbled together" from the start. 

Here's a more detailed version of the Wisconsin public radio story... 

https://madison.com/ct/entertainment/city-life/citing-racist-and-sexist-material-wpr-cancels-old-time-radio-drama-after-31-years/article_4cf0f9dc-b3de-552b-99bb-7ed2e73f6427.html

An excerpt:

<<But Ideas Network director Sheryl Gasser said the change had been in the works for years, with both listeners and staff complaining about some of the content on the historic shows.

"Certainly, the current national conversation about race played a role in moving more quickly, but this is something we had been considering for several years," Gasser said in an interview via e-mail. "Our producers worked to vet content before it was broadcast, but given the pervasive sexism and racism in some productions it was very difficult to source programs that met our values."

 
 

Gasser said "Old Time Radio Drama" had already dropped several classic shows from its programming. There was also some discussion about recontextualizing the original shows to point out their objectionable content similar to what HBO MAX is doing, but in the end that didn't seem to work for a radio show.

"People typically tune in and out at different times.  Even if we created context for the broadcasts, there would be no guarantee that people would hear them."

-----------

To me, that last sentence is the strongest argument against simply rebroadcasting 80-year-old programming to a general audience with little or no discussion. Dial-spinners might tune-in mid-broadcast and hear a racist joke, laugh, and drive on.

But Web presentations of OTR are there for people who actively seek them out, and online has much more potential for "framing" broadcasts with introductions, comments, web page links, discussion forums, and collector groups. Those could provide just the "recontextualization" the Wisc programmer was talking about.  The "comment" functions at the Internet Archive and YouTube provide that capability, along with the ability to link to "context," especially history. 

First example that comes to mind, the Amos 'n' Andy at Wikipedia,  including some of Elizabeth McLeod's analysis and details like the early disagreement about the program between the African-American newspapers Pittsburgh Courier and Chicago Defender.  (Hmm. Maybe we could drop a link to that page into the OTRRLibrary folder of A&A episodes.)

Sorry for running on... mostly thinking outloud. Back to listening...

Bob in the Blue Ridge


Re: For Preservation's Sake

Bob Stepno
 

"Preservation," documentation and archiving of a half century of broadcast media is a noble cause, and I trust the Internet Archive and OTRR to keep doing that -- and making the results of their research more available to the public than is allowed within the constraints of academic libraries with limited funding for properly handling multimedia materials.

As this OTRR collector-community ages, perhaps members can identify institutions they recommend for inclusion in financial bequests (not just materials) to continue the work of preservation? Have any of the club newsletters had an article about that?

As for the threat of removal of shareable archived online materials, that sounds like culture-wars paranoia. Search the Internet Archive and I suspect you'll find a full political range of previously "burned books," from Marx to Hitler. 

We can't erase racism, white-supremacy and sexism in America by hiding the fact that our entertainment media long reflected those elements when they dominated the culture. Learning from history is one thing, but I can see how a public broadcaster might have difficulty providing a 21st century context for such programming on a regular basis.

I appreciate the Wisconsin argument about an education and public service focused (and listener-supported) radio station struggling to frame broadcasts that not only "preserved" the art of audio storytelling and entertainment... but also "preserved" the attitudes of decades when, for example, on-air authority figures were almost all white males, African-American characters were mostly comic and subservient, Asians were usually servants or evil enemies (whether Chinese houseboys, "Japs" in World War II or pulp-novel master-villains in adventure series), and women were too often secondary characters, victims, or "just homemakers" (with many wonderful exceptions, thanks to numerous fine female writers and actors).

I like to think that with more time, money and imagination a radio station could have managed the "contextualization" problem, but I never heard the Wisconsin attempts, and the article admits the program was "cobbled together" from the start. 

Here's a more detailed version of the Wisconsin public radio story... 

https://madison.com/ct/entertainment/city-life/citing-racist-and-sexist-material-wpr-cancels-old-time-radio-drama-after-31-years/article_4cf0f9dc-b3de-552b-99bb-7ed2e73f6427.html

An excerpt:

<<But Ideas Network director Sheryl Gasser said the change had been in the works for years, with both listeners and staff complaining about some of the content on the historic shows.

"Certainly, the current national conversation about race played a role in moving more quickly, but this is something we had been considering for several years," Gasser said in an interview via e-mail. "Our producers worked to vet content before it was broadcast, but given the pervasive sexism and racism in some productions it was very difficult to source programs that met our values."

 
 

Gasser said "Old Time Radio Drama" had already dropped several classic shows from its programming. There was also some discussion about recontextualizing the original shows to point out their objectionable content similar to what HBO MAX is doing, but in the end that didn't seem to work for a radio show.

"People typically tune in and out at different times.  Even if we created context for the broadcasts, there would be no guarantee that people would hear them."

-----------

To me, that last sentence is the strongest argument against simply rebroadcasting 80-year-old programming to a general audience with little or no discussion. Dial-spinners might tune-in mid-broadcast and hear a racist joke, laugh, and drive on.

But Web presentations of OTR are there for people who actively seek them out, and online has much more potential for "framing" broadcasts with introductions, comments, web page links, discussion forums, and collector groups. Those could provide just the "recontextualization" the Wisc programmer was talking about.  The "comment" functions at the Internet Archive and YouTube provide that capability, along with the ability to link to "context," especially history. 

First example that comes to mind, the Amos 'n' Andy at Wikipedia,  including some of Elizabeth McLeod's analysis and details like the early disagreement about the program between the African-American newspapers Pittsburgh Courier and Chicago Defender.  (Hmm. Maybe we could drop a link to that page into the OTRRLibrary folder of A&A episodes.)

Sorry for running on... mostly thinking outloud. Back to listening...

Bob in the Blue Ridge


Re: For Preservation's Sake

-
 

In contrast to the wpr decision to remove otr as a whole ; wamu another university station with a weekend otr show does a heads up for an episode which might contain
questionable situations/contents for some. The host explains what it is and some idea of context for it. This makes it a teachable moment in historical context that bulk
removal doesn't permit and is lost.

On Sun, 25 Apr 2021, Wild West Designs wrote:

That might have been it. It fits location and time period when it was
published.

Maybe I assumed Amos and Andy due to it mentioning comedy.

I don't know why they just didn't do the normal disclaimer (even after
returning from station breaks if afraid that later joiners missed it
originally) saying that the show doesn't represent the values of the
station as it is today and the shows should be judged/enjoyed in the
context of when they original aired. If someone still has a problem,
they should just go elsewhere, no need to consumer the entertainment.

Even if they totally took the OTR block off the air, I wouldn't
necessarily have a problem. They can cater to whatever market that they
want to. What I do have a problem is when people (I'm not saying WPR
is/was one of them, talking general here) that don't want it or trying
to get it denied to people that do want it, for whatever reason and in a
lot of instances, the market that does want it tends to be bigger then
the market that doesn't want it. Just not as vocal (and I think that's
part of the problem), but they do tend to "speak" louder with their
wallet though. This is why we have a new saying in our lexicon ("get
woke, go broke").

This is why I worry about what Conde Nast is going to do with the Shadow
(now the direct issue was what went on with Teen Vogue, while not
directly Conde, it is apart of their media empire if I'm remembering
correctly). I saw The Lone Ranger ruined by Disney (and I so wanted to
like that movie). Now, it is their IP to ruin, that is true. But once
you know where a certain IP leads to, it's very hard to totally enjoy
the old stuff and the people that were apart of that legacy.

I think people underestimate how important our hero's are from a
cultural and societal standpoint.

---
Evan West

otrDB and otrDBPlayer [1] programs using Qt framework

On Sun, Apr 25, 2021 at 10:40 AM, -
<dandunfee@gmail.com> wrote:

There was a sat/sun otr 3 hr. show on wpr that was removed entirely
without explaning what was "offensive" ffor an entire historical genre;
not just individuall examples
of what might bee"offensive".

'Wis. Public Radio drops old-time radio shows over racist, sexist
content'

https://www.wdio.com/duluth-minnesota-news/wisconsin-public-radio-drops-old-time-radio-shows-over-racist-sexist-content/5758411/



Links:
------
[1]
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1VgaYSe5wwpKOBjuaThUuwoR8JvJasMkb?usp=sharing





--
Dan d.
XR


Short audio story on Ora Nichols - sound effects technician in early radio

James Blazier
 

There was a pretty interesting story on Ora Nichols on NPR last Thursday.
She did sound effects for some early radio shows; including War of the Worlds.
You can find the story below.


Wikipedia also has a short entry for her
en.wikipedia.org

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