Date   

Re: A Question

John Gassman
 

The only thing he is not doing anymore is hosting his long time running internet radio show.
John
At 11:05 AM 11/28/2021, you wrote:

He posts regularly in the Facebook group, usually sharing posts of OTR episodes he believes to not be in circulation.


On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 1:03 PM Walden Hughes < waldenhughes@...> wrote:

Jerry is still with us and he is running his web site.  Take care,

Â

Walden

Â

 

Â

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [ mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Sunday, November 28, 2021 10:48 AM
To: ' main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io' < main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io>
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] A Question

Â

Does anyone know whether Jerry Haendiges is dead or alive?  If he is alive, do you know if he is still running Vintage Radio Logs and mailing out CDs when orders come in for them?

Â

Thank you.

Â

Larry


--
Larry Maupin


JAWS Certified, 2014.
http://www.FreedomScientific.com/Certification


Re: A Question

Brian Kavanaugh
 

He posts regularly in the Facebook group, usually sharing posts of OTR episodes he believes to not be in circulation.


On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 1:03 PM Walden Hughes <waldenhughes@...> wrote:

Jerry is still with us and he is running his web site.  Take care,

 

Walden

 

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Sunday, November 28, 2021 10:48 AM
To: 'main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io' <main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io>
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] A Question

 

Does anyone know whether Jerry Haendiges is dead or alive?  If he is alive, do you know if he is still running Vintage Radio Logs and mailing out CDs when orders come in for them?

 

Thank you.

 

Larry


--
Larry Maupin


Re: A Question

Walden Hughes
 

Jerry is still with us and he is running his web site.  Take care,

 

Walden

 

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Sunday, November 28, 2021 10:48 AM
To: 'main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io' <main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io>
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] A Question

 

Does anyone know whether Jerry Haendiges is dead or alive?  If he is alive, do you know if he is still running Vintage Radio Logs and mailing out CDs when orders come in for them?

 

Thank you.

 

Larry


--
Larry Maupin


A Question

Larry Maupin
 

Does anyone know whether Jerry Haendiges is dead or alive?  If he is alive, do you know if he is still running Vintage Radio Logs and mailing out CDs when orders come in for them?

Thank you.

Larry

--
Larry Maupin


Dropbox/OneDrive/pCloud - Man from Homicide v2111 #new-distro

Brian Kavanaugh
 

An new release of the "Man from Homicide" distro, version 2111, was announced in the distro group, https://oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io/g/OTRRDistroGroup

Note: this is a preliminary release of this distro. The distro will be announced later on Facebook/uploaded to YouTube/uploaded to Archive.org once this audience has looked through the distro. That way, if any errors are found, they can be corrected before it is published to locations that are harder to update.


Rudy Vallee Show

Ryan Ellett
 

Dave Tysver and I discovered that an old OTRR certified set for the Rudy Vallee Show (the 1946-1947 program) was never uploaded to Archive.org. It was originally released in 2011, so ten years ago. It's possible many of our members have not had access to this set until now if you missed it back when it was originally distributed. Here is the link. Thanks for uploading it, Dave!

Ryan


Frank Lovejoy's Radio Career (video presentation and resources)

Joe Webb
 

Last August, Don Ramlow, Karl Schadow, and I presented a discussion of Frank Lovejoy's radio career at the Mid-Atlantic Nostalgia Convention. The hotel's air conditioning broke down a couple of days before and created numerous problems. When we recorded it live, the background noise of the fans (the motorized air moving things not throngs of OTR groupies) was prominent in the recordings. Last month, the three of us 'Zoomed' and created a new recording. It's all edited and now available on YouTube.
https://youtu.be/sWl-QUnbrF8

The resources page for the presentation has been updated and the video can be viewed from there, and slides and audio (makes a good podcast for the car) can be downloaded, too.
https://sites.google.com/view/frankmanc

There's links to a lot of Lovejoy video, including the Night Beat TV "pilot," episodes of Meet McGraw, movies, interviews, and other items of interest. Enjoy!

--


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Joe Webb
 

In reading the story, I had wondered who the "Estes Kefauver" was whom Rich cited as an investigator.
He was known for his aggressive crime and anti-trust investigations while in the Senate representing Tennessee.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estes_Kefauver
In 1952 he won more primaries than Stevenson did, even beating Harry Truman, and under current party rules would probably have been the nominee. But party leaders decided Stevenson was the better choice to run against Eisenhower.
He led the primaries again in 1956, but Adlai Stevenson was the nominee again, but Kefauver was on the ticket as the VP candidate.

--


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

John Gassman
 

Terrific Article!!

John
At 12:58 PM 11/26/2021, you wrote:

Listening Post and TV Review
By Allen Rich
 
Last Sunday George Allen extended an invitation to me to visit Studio 2 at CBS and see how The Whistler is produced.
 
Now, on the years hottest Sunday a man shouldnt be working, but Mr. Allen worded his invitation with devilish cunning.  He said: Betty Lou Gerson will be in it.
 
That did it because it is a well-known fact to one and all that I am very much that way about Miss Betty Lou Gerson and there is only one thing that keeps us apart.
 
Her husband Joe Ainlee - who is six-feet four.
 
After receiving a report from my private private eye Estes Kefauver that Joe wouldnt be around I accepted the invitation.
 
I arrived at the rehearsal to find that Betty Lou hadn't forgotten me.
 
Hi, she said passionately, so touched that she almost looked up from her script.
 
Modus operandi on The Whistler goes like this:
 
Each week Ed Bloodworth, director and supervisor of the show for the Barton A. Stebbins Agency selects the best possible script from the many submitted.
 
A first reading by the cast commences Sundays at 2:30.
 
The players, seated around a long table, read their roles under the guidance of CBS Director-Producer George Allen.
 
Although none has seen the script prior to the first reading they managed to give excellent interpretations.
 
Reason for this is that only seasoned players are used on The Whistler.  It is old stuff to them.
 
During this part of the proceedings Allen offers only a few suggestions, permitting the cast to get the feel of their various roles.
 
Occasionally an actor will ask permission to change a word here or there for better, clearer meaning or mood.  His case is heard patiently by Allen - and often the change is made.
 
The first reading takes about an hour and then after cuts and revisions have been taken care of  Producer Allen and his aides repair to the control room and the serious business of the day begins.
 
Sundays show, in case you didnt hear it, was titled You Cant Trust a Stranger.
 
Cast members were Gerald Mohr, Miss Gerson, a cute trick entitled Charlotte Lawrence, and Shep Menkin.
 
It is during the rehearsal following the first reading that the mood of the drama, the nuances of the lines, the timing, the sound effects are really set.
 
It is here, when necessary, that Allen gives HIS interpretation of the readings to the actors - and they listen.  Sometimes they dissent.
 
Allen is always open to suggestions and if he agrees hell go along - if not his is the final say and the players do not argue about it once he assumes his well-known tone of firm authority.
 
Special mention here should be accorded that very fine actor Gerry Mohr.  He responds to suggestion and direction like a Stradivarius to the clever fingers of a master violinist.
 
And while dispensing the orchids lets not overlook the sound men Bern Surrey and Ross Murray who toiled mightily and with intelligent anonymity throughout Sundays show.
 
I clocked the following effects: A motor idling, a motor speeding, cars passing, squealing of brakes, a car crash, chimes, clock ticking, men walking on earth, men walking on gravel, doors opening, closing, banging, crickets, a car going over a ledge into the water, and many others.
 
An error or two on their parts and the program that has rated tops in popularity for a longer period of time than any other West Coast program in radio history could easily go from the highly dramatic to the ridiculous.
 
Following the rehearsal we have just discussed all hands take time out for dinner and are told to return at six oclock.
 
Now the final stage, the dress rehearsal, is at hand.
 
New scripts containing all corrections made during the afternoon are put in use, Wilbur Hatch and his musicians, members of the quartet who do the Signal Oil Co. singing commercial.  Announcer Marvin Miller and Dorothy Roberts, the gal who does the programs famed live whistling have all come in.
 
It is during this session that these components parts of the show are correlated and it is all done with a minimum of fuss.
 
You realize that The Whistler is a team affair with actors, sound men, musicians and producer working smoothly together for the common good of all.
 
The program will go on the air at 7:30 and by about 7 the dress rehearsal is over.
 
Assistant CBS Director Bill Nelson glances at the notations on his script and tells Producer Allen how the show ran for time.
 
Sundays dress was about 25 seconds too long.  This was easily corrected by deleting perhaps five lines and speeding up the reading.
 
The remaining moments until air time are given over to final instructions by Allen and I noted with interest that when all was in readiness it was 7:27.
 
Allen invariably likes to wind things up close to air time because in that easy there is less chance for a letdown by the cast.
 
And then theres the exciting warning, One Minute.  Allen raises his arm in the air.  Everyone has taken their positions.
 
Then: Five seconds.
 
The jumping red second hand of the control room clock reaches for straight up, or exactly 7:30, and simultaneously Allen drops his arm, flips the cue as the engineer flicks a switch.
 
The Whistler is on the air!


JAWS Certified, 2014.
http://www.FreedomScientific.com/Certification


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Joe Webb
 

Steve that's SUPER! Thanks for pitching in!

Anyone taking a shot at an audio recording?

--


Martin Grams discount

Ryan Ellett
 

If you're wanting some OTR books for the holidays, Martin Grams has 15% off his books (https://www.martingrams.biz) through the weekend. I'm not sure what the threshold is, but there was no shipping charge on the order I just placed. The discount code is 15DISCOUNT.
Ryan


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Larry Gassman
 

Thank you so much.

Larry

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve Arndt via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 26, 2021 12:58 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

 

Listening Post and TV Review

By Allen Rich

 

Last Sunday George Allen extended an invitation to me to visit Studio 2 at CBS and see how “The Whistler” is produced.

 

Now, on the year’s hottest Sunday a man shouldn’t be working, but Mr. Allen worded his invitation with devilish cunning.  He said: “Betty Lou Gerson will be in it.”

 

That did it because it is a well-known fact to one and all that I am very much that way about Miss Betty Lou Gerson and there is only one thing that keeps us apart.

 

Her husband Joe Ainlee - who is six-feet four.

 

After receiving a report from my private private eye Estes Kefauver that Joe wouldn’t be around I accepted the invitation.

 

I arrived at the rehearsal to find that Betty Lou hadn't forgotten me.

 

“Hi,” she said passionately, so touched that she almost looked up from her script.

 

Modus operandi on “The Whistler” goes like this:

 

Each week Ed Bloodworth, director and supervisor of the show for the Barton A. Stebbins Agency selects the best possible script from the many submitted.

 

A first reading by the cast commences Sundays at 2:30.

 

The players, seated around a long table, read their roles under the guidance of CBS Director-Producer George Allen.

 

Although none has seen the script prior to the first reading they managed to give excellent interpretations.

 

Reason for this is that only seasoned players are used on “The Whistler.”  It is old stuff to them.

 

During this part of the proceedings Allen offers only a few suggestions, permitting the cast to get the feel of their various roles.

 

Occasionally an actor will ask permission to change a word here or there for better, clearer meaning or mood.  His case is heard patiently by Allen - and often the change is made.

 

The first reading takes about an hour and then after cuts and revisions have been taken care of  Producer Allen and his aides repair to the control room and the serious business of the day begins.

 

Sunday’s show, in case you didn’t hear it, was titled “You Can’t Trust a Stranger.”

 

Cast members were Gerald Mohr, Miss Gerson, a cute trick entitled Charlotte Lawrence, and Shep Menkin.

 

It is during the rehearsal following the first reading that the mood of the drama, the nuances of the lines, the timing, the sound effects are really set.

 

It is here, when necessary, that Allen gives HIS interpretation of the readings to the actors - and they listen.  Sometimes they dissent.

 

Allen is always open to suggestions and if he agrees he’ll go along - if not his is the final say and the players do not argue about it once he assumes his well-known tone of firm authority.

 

Special mention here should be accorded that very fine actor Gerry Mohr.  He responds to suggestion and direction like a Stradivarius to the clever fingers of a master violinist.

 

And while dispensing the orchids let’s not overlook the sound men Bern Surrey and Ross Murray who toiled mightily and with intelligent anonymity throughout Sunday’s show.

 

I clocked the following effects: A motor idling, a motor speeding, cars passing, squealing of brakes, a car crash, chimes, clock ticking, men walking on earth, men walking on gravel, doors opening, closing, banging, crickets, a car going over a ledge into the water, and many others.

 

An error or two on their parts and “the program that has rated tops in popularity for a longer period of time than any other West Coast program in radio history” could easily go from the highly dramatic to the ridiculous.

 

Following the rehearsal we have just discussed all hands take time out for dinner and are told to return at six o’clock.

 

Now the final stage, the dress rehearsal, is at hand.

 

New scripts containing all corrections made during the afternoon are put in use, Wilbur Hatch and his musicians, members of the quartet who do the Signal Oil Co. singing commercial.  Announcer Marvin Miller and Dorothy Roberts, the gal who does the program’s famed “live” whistling have all come in.

 

It is during this session that these components parts of the show are correlated and it is all done with a minimum of fuss.

 

You realize that “The Whistler” is a team affair with actors, sound men, musicians and producer working smoothly together for the common good of all.

 

The program will go on the air at 7:30 and by about 7 the dress rehearsal is over.

 

Assistant CBS Director Bill Nelson glances at the notations on his script and tells Producer Allen how the show ran for time.

 

Sunday’s dress was about 25 seconds too long.  This was easily corrected by deleting perhaps five lines and speeding up the reading.

 

The remaining moments until air time are given over to final instructions by Allen and I noted with interest that when all was in readiness it was 7:27.

 

Allen invariably likes to wind things up close to air time because in that easy there is less chance for a letdown by the cast.

 

And then there’s the exciting warning, “One Minute.”  Allen raises his arm in the air.  Everyone has taken their positions.

 

Then: “Five seconds.”

 

The jumping red second hand of the control room clock reaches for “straight up,” or exactly 7:30, and simultaneously Allen drops his arm, flips the cue as the engineer flicks a switch.

 

“The Whistler” is on the air!


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Steve Arndt
 

Listening Post and TV Review
By Allen Rich
 
Last Sunday George Allen extended an invitation to me to visit Studio 2 at CBS and see how “The Whistler” is produced.
 
Now, on the year’s hottest Sunday a man shouldn’t be working, but Mr. Allen worded his invitation with devilish cunning.  He said: “Betty Lou Gerson will be in it.”
 
That did it because it is a well-known fact to one and all that I am very much that way about Miss Betty Lou Gerson and there is only one thing that keeps us apart.
 
Her husband Joe Ainlee - who is six-feet four.
 
After receiving a report from my private private eye Estes Kefauver that Joe wouldn’t be around I accepted the invitation.
 
I arrived at the rehearsal to find that Betty Lou hadn't forgotten me.
 
“Hi,” she said passionately, so touched that she almost looked up from her script.
 
Modus operandi on “The Whistler” goes like this:
 
Each week Ed Bloodworth, director and supervisor of the show for the Barton A. Stebbins Agency selects the best possible script from the many submitted.
 
A first reading by the cast commences Sundays at 2:30.
 
The players, seated around a long table, read their roles under the guidance of CBS Director-Producer George Allen.
 
Although none has seen the script prior to the first reading they managed to give excellent interpretations.
 
Reason for this is that only seasoned players are used on “The Whistler.”  It is old stuff to them.
 
During this part of the proceedings Allen offers only a few suggestions, permitting the cast to get the feel of their various roles.
 
Occasionally an actor will ask permission to change a word here or there for better, clearer meaning or mood.  His case is heard patiently by Allen - and often the change is made.
 
The first reading takes about an hour and then after cuts and revisions have been taken care of  Producer Allen and his aides repair to the control room and the serious business of the day begins.
 
Sunday’s show, in case you didn’t hear it, was titled “You Can’t Trust a Stranger.”
 
Cast members were Gerald Mohr, Miss Gerson, a cute trick entitled Charlotte Lawrence, and Shep Menkin.
 
It is during the rehearsal following the first reading that the mood of the drama, the nuances of the lines, the timing, the sound effects are really set.
 
It is here, when necessary, that Allen gives HIS interpretation of the readings to the actors - and they listen.  Sometimes they dissent.
 
Allen is always open to suggestions and if he agrees he’ll go along - if not his is the final say and the players do not argue about it once he assumes his well-known tone of firm authority.
 
Special mention here should be accorded that very fine actor Gerry Mohr.  He responds to suggestion and direction like a Stradivarius to the clever fingers of a master violinist.
 
And while dispensing the orchids let’s not overlook the sound men Bern Surrey and Ross Murray who toiled mightily and with intelligent anonymity throughout Sunday’s show.
 
I clocked the following effects: A motor idling, a motor speeding, cars passing, squealing of brakes, a car crash, chimes, clock ticking, men walking on earth, men walking on gravel, doors opening, closing, banging, crickets, a car going over a ledge into the water, and many others.
 
An error or two on their parts and “the program that has rated tops in popularity for a longer period of time than any other West Coast program in radio history” could easily go from the highly dramatic to the ridiculous.
 
Following the rehearsal we have just discussed all hands take time out for dinner and are told to return at six o’clock.
 
Now the final stage, the dress rehearsal, is at hand.
 
New scripts containing all corrections made during the afternoon are put in use, Wilbur Hatch and his musicians, members of the quartet who do the Signal Oil Co. singing commercial.  Announcer Marvin Miller and Dorothy Roberts, the gal who does the program’s famed “live” whistling have all come in.
 
It is during this session that these components parts of the show are correlated and it is all done with a minimum of fuss.
 
You realize that “The Whistler” is a team affair with actors, sound men, musicians and producer working smoothly together for the common good of all.
 
The program will go on the air at 7:30 and by about 7 the dress rehearsal is over.
 
Assistant CBS Director Bill Nelson glances at the notations on his script and tells Producer Allen how the show ran for time.
 
Sunday’s dress was about 25 seconds too long.  This was easily corrected by deleting perhaps five lines and speeding up the reading.
 
The remaining moments until air time are given over to final instructions by Allen and I noted with interest that when all was in readiness it was 7:27.
 
Allen invariably likes to wind things up close to air time because in that easy there is less chance for a letdown by the cast.
 
And then there’s the exciting warning, “One Minute.”  Allen raises his arm in the air.  Everyone has taken their positions.
 
Then: “Five seconds.”
 
The jumping red second hand of the control room clock reaches for “straight up,” or exactly 7:30, and simultaneously Allen drops his arm, flips the cue as the engineer flicks a switch.
 
“The Whistler” is on the air!


Re: A missing Suspense I'd love to hear

Ryan Ellett
 

I think Joe's original message indicated it was not in circulation and he was hoping it would eventually surface. At least we've got some clippings and story summaries of its contents, though.
Ryan


On Fri, Nov 26, 2021 at 02:51 AM, Richard Davenport wrote:
The Suspense episode number you are looking for is #389.  It is not in the OTRR library presently.
 
Labor ipse voluptas
 
 


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Joe Webb
 

In my email to Larry I mentioned
  • it is a multi-column article created by cut-and-paste
  • There is a banner item that goes across the first 3 columns
  • the columns are not the straightest
I forgot to mention that the image quality is not the best -- the characters do not have the kind of definition that OCR needs to get an error-free conversion.

Hope that helps figure out how to get a good conversion

--


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Michael Hingson
 

I see Joe that you attached the image. Stay tuned.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joe Webb via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 26, 2021 9:09 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

 

Critic Allen Rich visits a rehearsal and a broadcast of The Whistler. It's a nice window to early 1950s network production. The show he writes about is in circulation, 1952-07-27 You Can't Trust a Stranger.

The nature of the image is that it would be difficult for some of our blind members to have it read by their OCR software.

Could someone record their reading of the story and save it as an audio file attached to this thread?


--


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Michael Hingson
 

As with Larry, please send it and we will see if we can make sense of it. Thanks.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Gassman
Sent: Friday, November 26, 2021 9:36 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

 

Can you send me the image file and I will check to see if it is readable?

Larry

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joe Webb via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 26, 2021 9:09 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

 

Critic Allen Rich visits a rehearsal and a broadcast of The Whistler. It's a nice window to early 1950s network production. The show he writes about is in circulation, 1952-07-27 You Can't Trust a Stranger.

The nature of the image is that it would be difficult for some of our blind members to have it read by their OCR software.

Could someone record their reading of the story and save it as an audio file attached to this thread?


--


Re: 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Larry Gassman
 

Can you send me the image file and I will check to see if it is readable?

Larry

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joe Webb via groups.io
Sent: Friday, November 26, 2021 9:09 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] 1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

 

Critic Allen Rich visits a rehearsal and a broadcast of The Whistler. It's a nice window to early 1950s network production. The show he writes about is in circulation, 1952-07-27 You Can't Trust a Stranger.

The nature of the image is that it would be difficult for some of our blind members to have it read by their OCR software.

Could someone record their reading of the story and save it as an audio file attached to this thread?


--


1952 Article about a Whistler rehearsal by an LA columnist

Joe Webb
 

Critic Allen Rich visits a rehearsal and a broadcast of The Whistler. It's a nice window to early 1950s network production. The show he writes about is in circulation, 1952-07-27 You Can't Trust a Stranger.

The nature of the image is that it would be difficult for some of our blind members to have it read by their OCR software.

Could someone record their reading of the story and save it as an audio file attached to this thread?


--


Re: A missing Suspense I'd love to hear

Richard Davenport
 

The Suspense episode number you are looking for is #389.  It is not in the OTRR library presently.

Labor ipse voluptas


On Saturday, November 13, 2021, 11:13:14 AM CST, Joe Webb via groups.io <drjoewebb@...> wrote:


Please start a new thread for this topic -- this is a Suspense message -- just click "New Topic" on the left hand side of the page
This way your message will get much more attention and you may have more success finding other Sinatra fans and possibly these programs
When I see that it's done, I will delete these messages


--