Date   

Re: Must-have OTR book

Patrick Andre
 
Edited

Although it is only for one show, the three (3!) volume set called "The 'Who Is Johnny Dollar' Matter"  by John C. Abbott is excellent, and extremely complete.  Everything you ever wanted to know about Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar, and several things you likely didn't want to know.

~Patrick


Re: Must-have OTR book

Ryan Ellett
 

I think Mike meant David Siegel's Resource guide. Autocorrect maybe changed it to Save? Paul Kornman has been working to update these contacts, incidentally. But an amazing resource, no doubt!

Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:50:28 AM CST, Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims@...> wrote:


For research it's got to be Saved resource guide to the golden age. What a treasure. You can know where soooooo many collections and information are. What universities etc. He even put web sites, contact names with the libraries. Invaluable I say.




Re: Must-have OTR book

Ryan Ellett
 

I am under the impression that his book writing days are done but would be thrilled to be proven wrong down the road!

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:52:55 AM CST, Walden Hughes <waldenhughes@...> wrote:


Hi Everybody,

 

Jim wrote 25 articles last year that will be sent out to the hobby to different newsletter. I am so glad Jim is back,

 

Walden 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 9:39 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

 

Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

 

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

 

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

 

Larry

 


Re: Must-have OTR book

Mike Thomas
 

Dave Siegels resource guide. Sorry! It's the phone. This is an absolute must


On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 9:52 AM, Walden Hughes
<waldenhughes@...> wrote:

Hi Everybody,

 

Jim wrote 25 articles last year that will be sent out to the hobby to different newsletter. I am so glad Jim is back,

 

Walden 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 9:39 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

 

Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

 

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

 

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

 

Larry

 


Re: Must-have OTR book

Ryan Ellett
 

John (I did not pay him to ask this), judging by my sales statements very few have read my books! Or at least bought them. "Best" is a tricky word. Of my "babies" I think the Encyclopedia of Black Radio is the most important; a lot of the information there is still found nowhere else, despite some editing errors that still irritate me ten years later! I've had three or four graduate students inquire about specific individuals and series in the book and I hope someday it leads to much more research into early black contributions to radio. 

But I think the most interesting to sit down and read would be the Texas Rangers, especially if you're into the Western music of the era. They did many films and backed up Gene Autry on film and radio at times. It's a narrative history whereas the Black Radio volume is encyclopedia entries. Of course I like the other two but they are probably more niche.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:31:39 AM CST, John <johnenrietto@...> wrote:


It is too hard to rank OTR books.  I cannot choose which would be #2.  I love them all!!  A book which satisfies my love for history is Words At War by Howard Blue, a great book detailing radio during the WWII years.  When I want pure entertainment, I am currently reading Jack Benny's Lost Radio Broadcasts from May 2nd to July 27th, 1932.  

Ryan, I have not had the pleasure of reading one of your books yet.  Which would you say is best?  Is that like ranking your children?  Before this year is over I will add one of your books to my collection.

John    



Re: Must-have OTR book

Walden Hughes
 

Hi Everybody,

 

Jim wrote 25 articles last year that will be sent out to the hobby to different newsletter. I am so glad Jim is back,

 

Walden 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 9:39 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

 

Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

 

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

 

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

 

Larry

 


Re: Must-have OTR book

Mike Thomas
 

For research it's got to be Saved resource guide to the golden age. What a treasure. You can know where soooooo many collections and information are. What universities etc. He even put web sites, contact names with the libraries. Invaluable I say.


On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 9:38 AM, Ryan Ellett via groups.io
<oldradiotimes@...> wrote:
Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

Larry



Re: Must-have OTR book

Ryan Ellett
 

Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

Larry



Re: Must-have OTR book

John
 

It is too hard to rank OTR books.  I cannot choose which would be #2.  I love them all!!  A book which satisfies my love for history is Words At War by Howard Blue, a great book detailing radio during the WWII years.  When I want pure entertainment, I am currently reading Jack Benny's Lost Radio Broadcasts from May 2nd to July 27th, 1932.  

Ryan, I have not had the pleasure of reading one of your books yet.  Which would you say is best?  Is that like ranking your children?  Before this year is over I will add one of your books to my collection.

John    

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:02 AM Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


Re: Request For Assistance

Ryan Ellett
 

Looks like the original Hillbilly Boys set (https://archive.org/details/OTRR_Certified_The_Hillbilly_Boys) includes some Light Crust Doughboys songs but no programs. I see six Doughboys episodes in our library that I'm not sure are in the set. I also see a few Crazy Water Crystal Programs in the set. Weren't a whole bunch of those made public on a site somewhere in the last couple years? I'm not sure they could be downloaded, just streamed. Ring a bell for anyone? It looks the Pappy O'Daniels set got a lot of diverse material inserted into it. Nice job, Geoff! Jim was always a sucker for that Western material...
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Tuesday, February 16, 2021, 02:18:21 PM CST, Geoff Loker <britcomm@...> wrote:


On 2021-02-16 9:14 a.m., Larry Maupin wrote:
> Geoff,  thank you for sharing such an interesting experience.  The
> phrase "Border Radio" has a nice ring to it, just as "Western Swing"
> does, and you obviously enjoyed working on the project.

"Border Radio" came into being because regulators were starting to clamp
down on some of the wild claims that were being made in advertisements
on the radio, and the fast and free days of early radio where the power
of a station's signal and its number on the dial weren't regulated were
coming to a close.  By moving a transmitter into Mexico, the "illegal"
signals could cover a much wider geographical range, in some cases
overpowering local stations as far north as Canada.  Border Radio was
powerful - think of Wolfman Jack.

"Western Swing" was a marriage of the Swing music that was popular in
the cities and the Country music that was popular in rural areas.  As
you say, it had a lot of energy to it, and it still thrives to this day.

As an aside, W. Lee O'Daniel was originally a salesman / spokesperson
for Light Crust Dough flour (I believe), and he had another band, The
Light Crust Doughboys, doing Western Swing music.  In the early '30's,
he was fired from that job, and he created his own company, Hillbilly
Flour, and The Hillbilly Boys to promote it.  The Light Crust Doughboys
were a very popular band (lots of recordings), and they had their own
radio show.  I don't remember if OTRRG managed to obtain any of their
programmes for a complementary distribution (or as an extra to the
Hillbilly Boys distro).  Might be a thought for the future...

BTW, in my research of the Hillbilly Boys, I found a Western Swing site
which was uploading the various shows that made their way to the
distribution, and I know that the site owner had originally copied the
shows in WAV format and then encoded to MP3 for his uploads.  I put Jim
in touch with him, and I believe that Jim managed to get WAV copies of
the shows that were then re-encoded into the high-bitrate files on the
distribution.  Does anyone know what happened to the WAV files?  Does
OTRRG still have them somewhere?







Re: Must-have OTR book

Larry Maupin
 

Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:34:04AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

Great choice. I think a Cox book might fill that need for anyone with a particular interest in one genre. He covered soaps, sitcoms, music, crime-fighters, audience participation shows, and news/commentary hosts. His book about the Hummerts, I think, is almost a must-have companion with his Soaps book. But that'd be cheating since I only said one book!

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 10:27:22 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Mine is The Great Radio Soap Operas by Jim Cox.  He has a lot of material in his chapters on 31 of the most famous OTR soap operas that cannot be found in any other publication that I have run across.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:02:40AM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Re: Must-have OTR book

Allan Foster
 

I probably shouldn't post on this because I never really read many OTR books.  Dunning's amazing book fulfilled my needs quite well.  However, I did enjoy Leonard Maltin's book The Great American Broadcast.

Allan

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 10:34:04 AM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:


Great choice. I think a Cox book might fill that need for anyone with a particular interest in one genre. He covered soaps, sitcoms, music, crime-fighters, audience participation shows, and news/commentary hosts. His book about the Hummerts, I think, is almost a must-have companion with his Soaps book. But that'd be cheating since I only said one book!

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 10:27:22 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Mine is The Great Radio Soap Operas by Jim Cox.  He has a lot of material in his chapters on 31 of the most famous OTR soap operas that cannot be found in any other publication that I have run across.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:02:40AM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Must-have OTR book

Ryan Ellett
 

Great choice. I think a Cox book might fill that need for anyone with a particular interest in one genre. He covered soaps, sitcoms, music, crime-fighters, audience participation shows, and news/commentary hosts. His book about the Hummerts, I think, is almost a must-have companion with his Soaps book. But that'd be cheating since I only said one book!

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 10:27:22 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Mine is The Great Radio Soap Operas by Jim Cox.  He has a lot of material in his chapters on 31 of the most famous OTR soap operas that cannot be found in any other publication that I have run across.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:02:40AM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Must-have OTR book

Larry Maupin
 

Mine is The Great Radio Soap Operas by Jim Cox.  He has a lot of material in his chapters on 31 of the most famous OTR soap operas that cannot be found in any other publication that I have run across.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:02:40AM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Must-have OTR book

Kent Schroder
 

McLeod’s Amos and Andy. Brings real insight into what the early show was like.


On Feb 17, 2021, at 10:02 AM, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:



I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


Must-have OTR book

Ryan Ellett
 

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


Re: Request For Assistance

jackies@tularosa.net
 

Rick:

How do you download songs from u-tube? I was never able to figure that out.

Sincerely (from the frozen dessert of New Mexico)

Jackie Schlageter


Re: Request For Assistance

Richard Davenport
 

I was able to grab about 23 of the Hillbilly Blues songs from youtube as well as eps 1&2 of their radio show...

Rick

Labor ipse voluptas


On Tuesday, February 16, 2021, 4:51:29 PM CST, Richard Davenport <klingon1@...> wrote:


A number of the songs are available on youtube...


Labor ipse voluptas


On Tuesday, February 16, 2021, 3:21:54 PM CST, Alan Kline <alan@...> wrote:


“...to deliver programming across the border for BROADCAST to the US.”

> On Feb 16, 2021, at 3:19 PM, Alan Kline <alan@...> wrote:
>
> to deliver programming across the border for delivery to the US.







Re: Request For Assistance

Richard Davenport
 

A number of the songs are available on youtube...


Labor ipse voluptas


On Tuesday, February 16, 2021, 3:21:54 PM CST, Alan Kline <alan@...> wrote:


“...to deliver programming across the border for BROADCAST to the US.”

> On Feb 16, 2021, at 3:19 PM, Alan Kline <alan@...> wrote:
>
> to deliver programming across the border for delivery to the US.







Re: Request For Assistance

Alan Kline
 

“...to deliver programming across the border for BROADCAST to the US.”

On Feb 16, 2021, at 3:19 PM, Alan Kline <alan@snugglebunny.us> wrote:

to deliver programming across the border for delivery to the US.

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