Date   

Re: Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Richard Davenport
 

Someone mentioned Springbok.  I was curious about what that was and found a nice article on Wiki about it.


Labor ipse voluptas


On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 6:48:19 PM CST, Michael Hingson <mike@...> wrote:


Enjoy dinner.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 4:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Sure. I’m not sure what OTTR already has but when I get back from dinner tonight I’ll make DropBox shares for Sherlock Holmes and Squad Cars.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Hingson
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 7:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott,

 

Might you be willing to share Springbok?

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

I have 210 BBC Sherlock Holmes episodes ranging from 1945 to 2010. Would we consider the 65 that are prior to 1962 OTR? Or is the BBC just BBC? And I have 47 Springbok episodes from the 80’s. You can’t not like Springbok (Squad Cars!) but you just can’t call it OTR. I kind-of think OTR is an American thing. Fun to talk about.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 9:26 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott, I have dozens of BBC dramas on cassettes, and most of the ones I have listened to are very good.  I do not think that any are in the OTRR Library collection, probably because most people do not consider them to be old-time radio.

 

Thank you for your comments about The Little Things in Life.  It seems that you might think it qualifies as an old-time radio series.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday January 8 2021 9:54:19AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Although not American, the BBC never stopped doing drama. The CBC continued into the 1990's at least, and South Africa and Australia were doing OTR type shows into the 1980's. A treasure trove is out there, waiting to be listened to. More drama, adventure and comedy than anyone could listen to in two lifetimes. And most, if not all of it top quality productions.

S


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Ken Arromdee
 

Don't forget the Fantastic Four radio show as a show from the 1975 revival.


Sears radio Theater

Walden Hughes
 

Hi Everybody,

 

I would suggest any article about new radio drama after 1962 should also include  the run of Sears and Mutual radio Theater for the two years it was on starting in the late 1970s.  Take care,

 

Walden

 

 


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Larry Maupin
 

Thank you Barbara!  I clicked on the link you posted and all four of the series are there under the individual title of each.  As members who have used this site will know, if the library has a series you usually just need to type in a few letters such as, in this case, "Faces" or "Little" or "Author's" or "To Have" and then on the full title that comes up to access all the episodes.  These are all ready to hear with just one click of the mouse on any title.  Another great job by Paul Kornman.

Now any member who wants to write an article on these four programs from 1975 or even curate a collection of them will be able to listen to as many as he or she wishes to.  I did notice that some of the episodes have 1976 dates, but that just makes it even better.

Larry



-----------------------------------------

From: "B. J. Watkins"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 7:31:24PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Larry,

David Oxford posted a link to the series:

"I thought I’d point out that the Purchasing Group made 149 episodes available to the OTRR Library a year or so ago. When I went to 
http://otrrlibrary.org/r.html I couldn’t find the series. When I went to https://www.otrr.org/OTRRLibrary/otrrlibrary.html and did a search for Radio Playhouse the 149 files showed up."

Each hour of Radio Playhouse has all four series.

Barbara

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> on behalf of Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...>
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 4:25 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows
 
Allan, I agree that the author would get to "draw all the lines and set all the label himself or herself.  What got me interested in this subject was a post yesterday from Walden Hughes mentioning an OTR revival in 1975 that involved six-month runs of Author's Studio, The Faces of Love, The Little Things in Life and To Have N Hold.  I think he said that Ted Davenport has about 88 total episodes of these four series combined, but he may not have digitized them yet.  None of them are on his website.  The problem with writing an article on them if I can't get them from Ted will be getting them from somewhere else.  He has not returned a message I sent him this afternoon, and that is not a good sign.

Possibly another group member will have them in his or her collection and can send them to me or any other member who would like to write an article on them and to include episodes of CBSRMT, Moon Over Morocco or anything else that an editor might actually publish.  I would be inclined to limit it just to the four series mentioned by Walden, but any writer would have the freedom to choose that you mention.

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Allan Foster via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 3:43:05PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Boy, if somebody tries this looking at radio of the 1970's they'll have a real job on their hands.  Besides those shows already mentioned, there are all the shows written and produced by ZBS.  The Jack Flanders series, such as Moon Over Morocco, The Third Tower of Inverness, were produced throughout the 70's and into the 80's.  Plus radio shows like Chicken Man.  In the 80's ZBS produced the Ruby, the Galactic Gumshoe shows.  I"m pretty sure ZBS is still producing shows.  I don't think most here would lump them in with OTR, but they were definitely influenced by OTR but modernized.  They were/are legitimate radio theater though, and I thought very well written and produced.  I always lumped them in with NTR myself.

The beauty of writing a "taxonomy" article about a non-sciece subject is that the author gets to draw all the lines and set all the labels himself or herself.  That's freedom!

Allan

On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 2:13:56 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin
--
Larry Maupin


Re: Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Michael Hingson
 

Enjoy dinner.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 4:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Sure. I’m not sure what OTTR already has but when I get back from dinner tonight I’ll make DropBox shares for Sherlock Holmes and Squad Cars.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Hingson
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 7:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott,

 

Might you be willing to share Springbok?

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

I have 210 BBC Sherlock Holmes episodes ranging from 1945 to 2010. Would we consider the 65 that are prior to 1962 OTR? Or is the BBC just BBC? And I have 47 Springbok episodes from the 80’s. You can’t not like Springbok (Squad Cars!) but you just can’t call it OTR. I kind-of think OTR is an American thing. Fun to talk about.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 9:26 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott, I have dozens of BBC dramas on cassettes, and most of the ones I have listened to are very good.  I do not think that any are in the OTRR Library collection, probably because most people do not consider them to be old-time radio.

 

Thank you for your comments about The Little Things in Life.  It seems that you might think it qualifies as an old-time radio series.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday January 8 2021 9:54:19AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Although not American, the BBC never stopped doing drama. The CBC continued into the 1990's at least, and South Africa and Australia were doing OTR type shows into the 1980's. A treasure trove is out there, waiting to be listened to. More drama, adventure and comedy than anyone could listen to in two lifetimes. And most, if not all of it top quality productions.

S


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Scott Mahan
 

Sure. I’m not sure what OTTR already has but when I get back from dinner tonight I’ll make DropBox shares for Sherlock Holmes and Squad Cars.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Hingson
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 7:44 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott,

 

Might you be willing to share Springbok?

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Scott Mahan
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 2:43 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

I have 210 BBC Sherlock Holmes episodes ranging from 1945 to 2010. Would we consider the 65 that are prior to 1962 OTR? Or is the BBC just BBC? And I have 47 Springbok episodes from the 80’s. You can’t not like Springbok (Squad Cars!) but you just can’t call it OTR. I kind-of think OTR is an American thing. Fun to talk about.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 9:26 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott, I have dozens of BBC dramas on cassettes, and most of the ones I have listened to are very good.  I do not think that any are in the OTRR Library collection, probably because most people do not consider them to be old-time radio.

 

Thank you for your comments about The Little Things in Life.  It seems that you might think it qualifies as an old-time radio series.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday January 8 2021 9:54:19AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Although not American, the BBC never stopped doing drama. The CBC continued into the 1990's at least, and South Africa and Australia were doing OTR type shows into the 1980's. A treasure trove is out there, waiting to be listened to. More drama, adventure and comedy than anyone could listen to in two lifetimes. And most, if not all of it top quality productions.

S


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

B. J. Watkins
 

Larry,

David Oxford posted a link to the series:

"I thought I’d point out that the Purchasing Group made 149 episodes available to the OTRR Library a year or so ago. When I went to 
http://otrrlibrary.org/r.html I couldn’t find the series. When I went to https://www.otrr.org/OTRRLibrary/otrrlibrary.html and did a search for Radio Playhouse the 149 files showed up."

Each hour of Radio Playhouse has all four series.

Barbara


From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> on behalf of Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...>
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 4:25 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows
 
Allan, I agree that the author would get to "draw all the lines and set all the label himself or herself.  What got me interested in this subject was a post yesterday from Walden Hughes mentioning an OTR revival in 1975 that involved six-month runs of Author's Studio, The Faces of Love, The Little Things in Life and To Have N Hold.  I think he said that Ted Davenport has about 88 total episodes of these four series combined, but he may not have digitized them yet.  None of them are on his website.  The problem with writing an article on them if I can't get them from Ted will be getting them from somewhere else.  He has not returned a message I sent him this afternoon, and that is not a good sign.

Possibly another group member will have them in his or her collection and can send them to me or any other member who would like to write an article on them and to include episodes of CBSRMT, Moon Over Morocco or anything else that an editor might actually publish.  I would be inclined to limit it just to the four series mentioned by Walden, but any writer would have the freedom to choose that you mention.

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Allan Foster via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 3:43:05PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Boy, if somebody tries this looking at radio of the 1970's they'll have a real job on their hands.  Besides those shows already mentioned, there are all the shows written and produced by ZBS.  The Jack Flanders series, such as Moon Over Morocco, The Third Tower of Inverness, were produced throughout the 70's and into the 80's.  Plus radio shows like Chicken Man.  In the 80's ZBS produced the Ruby, the Galactic Gumshoe shows.  I"m pretty sure ZBS is still producing shows.  I don't think most here would lump them in with OTR, but they were definitely influenced by OTR but modernized.  They were/are legitimate radio theater though, and I thought very well written and produced.  I always lumped them in with NTR myself.

The beauty of writing a "taxonomy" article about a non-sciece subject is that the author gets to draw all the lines and set all the labels himself or herself.  That's freedom!

Allan

On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 2:13:56 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Larry Maupin
 

Allan, I agree that the author would get to "draw all the lines and set all the label himself or herself.  What got me interested in this subject was a post yesterday from Walden Hughes mentioning an OTR revival in 1975 that involved six-month runs of Author's Studio, The Faces of Love, The Little Things in Life and To Have N Hold.  I think he said that Ted Davenport has about 88 total episodes of these four series combined, but he may not have digitized them yet.  None of them are on his website.  The problem with writing an article on them if I can't get them from Ted will be getting them from somewhere else.  He has not returned a message I sent him this afternoon, and that is not a good sign.

Possibly another group member will have them in his or her collection and can send them to me or any other member who would like to write an article on them and to include episodes of CBSRMT, Moon Over Morocco or anything else that an editor might actually publish.  I would be inclined to limit it just to the four series mentioned by Walden, but any writer would have the freedom to choose that you mention.

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Allan Foster via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 3:43:05PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Boy, if somebody tries this looking at radio of the 1970's they'll have a real job on their hands.  Besides those shows already mentioned, there are all the shows written and produced by ZBS.  The Jack Flanders series, such as Moon Over Morocco, The Third Tower of Inverness, were produced throughout the 70's and into the 80's.  Plus radio shows like Chicken Man.  In the 80's ZBS produced the Ruby, the Galactic Gumshoe shows.  I"m pretty sure ZBS is still producing shows.  I don't think most here would lump them in with OTR, but they were definitely influenced by OTR but modernized.  They were/are legitimate radio theater though, and I thought very well written and produced.  I always lumped them in with NTR myself.

The beauty of writing a "taxonomy" article about a non-sciece subject is that the author gets to draw all the lines and set all the labels himself or herself.  That's freedom!

Allan

On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 2:13:56 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Re: OTRR Curated Collection #2

Larry Maupin
 

I hope everyone who receives this message will click on the link Paul has provided.  It will take you to the collection document he has formatted with a spreadsheet showing all 22 episodes in the set with dates, titles and brief summaries.  To listen to any one of them, just single click on the title and then on the "play" icon that comes up.  The program will begin immediately.   

Most of these are full length with music included, and quite a few even have commercials.  Thank you to all the members of this group who helped me find the correct final episodes and to get the facts as straight as possible.

If you have a comment after looking everything over, please post it.

Larry   

-----------------------------------------

From: "Paul Kornman via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 5:45:15PM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] OTRR Curated Collection #2

Larry Maupin has put together the 2nd OTRR Curated Collection: "Final Episodes of Old-Time Radio Programs". Here's the link: https://www.otrr.org/OTRRLibrary/curated/curated002.html

- Paul

--
Larry Maupin


OTRR Curated Collection #2

Paul Kornman
 

Larry Maupin has put together the 2nd OTRR Curated Collection: "Final Episodes of Old-Time Radio Programs". Here's the link: https://www.otrr.org/OTRRLibrary/curated/curated002.html

- Paul


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Allan Foster
 

Boy, if somebody tries this looking at radio of the 1970's they'll have a real job on their hands.  Besides those shows already mentioned, there are all the shows written and produced by ZBS.  The Jack Flanders series, such as Moon Over Morocco, The Third Tower of Inverness, were produced throughout the 70's and into the 80's.  Plus radio shows like Chicken Man.  In the 80's ZBS produced the Ruby, the Galactic Gumshoe shows.  I"m pretty sure ZBS is still producing shows.  I don't think most here would lump them in with OTR, but they were definitely influenced by OTR but modernized.  They were/are legitimate radio theater though, and I thought very well written and produced.  I always lumped them in with NTR myself.

The beauty of writing a "taxonomy" article about a non-sciece subject is that the author gets to draw all the lines and set all the labels himself or herself.  That's freedom!

Allan

On Saturday, January 9, 2021, 2:13:56 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Larry Maupin
 

Michael, if somebody writes an article on "The Silver Age of Radio". he or she will have the most trouble trying to decide what to include.  It will be a lot of fun, but quite a challenge.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:37:07PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Larry Maupin
 

Thank you Bob.  I will add the Examiner as a source in the article.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: bob_pedersen@...
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 1:13:54PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Yes they did. Here is the radio log from the San Francisco Examiner that day.
 

From: Michael Hingson
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 1:19 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance
 

Larry,

 

I bet KCBS in San Francisco also broadcasted the last shows. I don’t know this for sure, but every time I tuned into KCBS once atmosphere skip allowed me to hear it from Southern California, I heard the same shows as I heard on KNX.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 6:19 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Thank you Michael.  KNX is the only radio station anyone has mentioned that may have broadcast the final episodes of Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar and Suspense.  I will add it to the article.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Thursday January 7 2021 10:36:00PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

I listened to all of these on KNX in Los Angeles. My memory is that YTJD came on at 5PM, Suspense at 5:30, HGWT at 6PM and Gunsmoke at 6:30.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 5:29 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Thank you Scott.  I just looked at the article using your link, and it really is interesting.  Apparently Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar aired at 6pm on at least some stations.  I think we got it at about 7:30 or 8 where I lived.  It confirms that both YTJD and Suspense aired their final episodes on the same night (September 30, 1962).  I would cite it in the article if it could be sourced beyond its appearance on the OTRCAT website.  Anonymous articles, as I think you would agree, are more problematical to cite than those that can be sourced to a specific newspaper or magazine.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Mahan"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Thursday January 7 2021 7:50:38PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

I suspect you have a site blocker problem with your virus protection software. Annoying stuff, always needing to be tuned.

But, if you can’t fix it, the article is attached.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 6:19 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Rick,

Thank you for the link, and I would like to read the article.  The link leads to a message that reads "Sorry, OTRCAT.com is currently unavailable."  This is what I have seen for probably a year now when trying to access the site because a remarkably large number of people have posted messages indicating that it is still an active old-time radio dealer.  I think that the owner either died or went out of business without closing the website.  If you were able to read the article using that link, then maybe I have just been blocked from the site for some reason without knowing it.

 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Richard Davenport"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Thursday January 7 2021 2:30:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Larry,

OTR Cat has an article on the subject...Here is the link

 

 

Labor ipse voluptas

 

 

On Thursday, January 7, 2021, 1:15:35 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Thank you John and Larry.  I just finished curating a collection of final episodes of old-time radio series, and I also have the last episode of Gunsmoke as June 19, 1961 and Have Gun, Will Travel as November 27, 1960.  I did, however, overlook Suspense and will mention it in the article along with Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Larry Gassman"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Thursday January 7 2021 1:25:03PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Actually, the last two shows to air episodes on September 30, 1962 were Suspense and Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar.

Have Gun, Will Travel left the air in 1960 and Gunsmoke in June of 1961.

Larry

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Nicholson
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 10:18 AM
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

I only know #1. In addition to Johnny Dollar, Suspense, Have Gun Will Travel, and Gunsmoke all aired their last episodes in 1962.

 

John

 

On Jan 7, 2021, at 11:59 AM, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

A number of fellow researchers have contributed important background information for the article I intend to submit to Ryan which will be entitled :"The 1965 Revival of Old-Time Radio."  I have started composing the first draft, and would like to ask the following questions of our sterling group of scholars, several of whom will be given credit in the body of the article:

 

1. Is it now the general consensus that the final year of old-time radio was 1962, not 1960?  If so, do you think any other series except Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar should be mentioned as having broadcast their final episode in 1962?

 

2. Does anyone know where radio station KEZU was located?

 

3. Brian Kavanaugh writes that there were radio stations in Glen Falls, New York and Rapid City, South Dakota that aired Big Sister and Pepper Young's Family in 1965.  I would like to know from Brian or anyone else the call letters of those stations.

 

4. I do not see in my notes the name and call letters and log of the radio station that aired the two soap operas during the evening.  Will the person who contributed that fact please resend it, including the time that each program was aired (I think it was 8:30 and 8:45)?

 

5. If anyone can locate newspaper logs that show broadcast times of the other old-time radio programs that were part of the 1965 revival (The Fat Man, Dear Dorothea Dix and Hollywood Talking) I would like to include those in the article.

 

I do think that the logs several members have contributed will make great visuals in the article.  Thanks again to Ryan Ellett, Randy Watts, Bob Pederson, Jim Jones, Joe Webb, Rick Davenport and others who have contributed such a wealth of material to be incorporated into the article.

 

If you have an answer to any of the above questions, just post it here or send it to me personally if you would prefer.

 

Larry


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Larry Maupin


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Michael Hingson
 

As long as we are discussing radio revivals we shouldn’t forget the Zero Hour narrated by Rod Serling.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2021 8:55 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.


--
Larry Maupin


Re: Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

bob_pedersen@...
 

Yes they did. Here is the radio log from the San Francisco Examiner that day.
 

From: Michael Hingson
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 1:19 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance
 

Larry,

 

I bet KCBS in San Francisco also broadcasted the last shows. I don’t know this for sure, but every time I tuned into KCBS once atmosphere skip allowed me to hear it from Southern California, I heard the same shows as I heard on KNX.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 6:19 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Thank you Michael.  KNX is the only radio station anyone has mentioned that may have broadcast the final episodes of Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar and Suspense.  I will add it to the article.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Michael Hingson"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Thursday January 7 2021 10:36:00PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

I listened to all of these on KNX in Los Angeles. My memory is that YTJD came on at 5PM, Suspense at 5:30, HGWT at 6PM and Gunsmoke at 6:30.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

Michael Hingson

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 5:29 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Thank you Scott.  I just looked at the article using your link, and it really is interesting.  Apparently Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar aired at 6pm on at least some stations.  I think we got it at about 7:30 or 8 where I lived.  It confirms that both YTJD and Suspense aired their final episodes on the same night (September 30, 1962).  I would cite it in the article if it could be sourced beyond its appearance on the OTRCAT website.  Anonymous articles, as I think you would agree, are more problematical to cite than those that can be sourced to a specific newspaper or magazine.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Mahan"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Thursday January 7 2021 7:50:38PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

I suspect you have a site blocker problem with your virus protection software. Annoying stuff, always needing to be tuned.

But, if you can’t fix it, the article is attached.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 6:19 PM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Rick,

Thank you for the link, and I would like to read the article.  The link leads to a message that reads "Sorry, OTRCAT.com is currently unavailable."  This is what I have seen for probably a year now when trying to access the site because a remarkably large number of people have posted messages indicating that it is still an active old-time radio dealer.  I think that the owner either died or went out of business without closing the website.  If you were able to read the article using that link, then maybe I have just been blocked from the site for some reason without knowing it.

 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Richard Davenport"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Thursday January 7 2021 2:30:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Larry,

OTR Cat has an article on the subject...Here is the link

 

 

Labor ipse voluptas

 

 

On Thursday, January 7, 2021, 1:15:35 PM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Thank you John and Larry.  I just finished curating a collection of final episodes of old-time radio series, and I also have the last episode of Gunsmoke as June 19, 1961 and Have Gun, Will Travel as November 27, 1960.  I did, however, overlook Suspense and will mention it in the article along with Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Larry Gassman"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Thursday January 7 2021 1:25:03PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Actually, the last two shows to air episodes on September 30, 1962 were Suspense and Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar.

Have Gun, Will Travel left the air in 1960 and Gunsmoke in June of 1961.

Larry

 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Nicholson
Sent: Thursday, January 7, 2021 10:18 AM
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

I only know #1. In addition to Johnny Dollar, Suspense, Have Gun Will Travel, and Gunsmoke all aired their last episodes in 1962.

 

John

 

On Jan 7, 2021, at 11:59 AM, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

A number of fellow researchers have contributed important background information for the article I intend to submit to Ryan which will be entitled :"The 1965 Revival of Old-Time Radio."  I have started composing the first draft, and would like to ask the following questions of our sterling group of scholars, several of whom will be given credit in the body of the article:

 

1. Is it now the general consensus that the final year of old-time radio was 1962, not 1960?  If so, do you think any other series except Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar should be mentioned as having broadcast their final episode in 1962?

 

2. Does anyone know where radio station KEZU was located?

 

3. Brian Kavanaugh writes that there were radio stations in Glen Falls, New York and Rapid City, South Dakota that aired Big Sister and Pepper Young's Family in 1965.  I would like to know from Brian or anyone else the call letters of those stations.

 

4. I do not see in my notes the name and call letters and log of the radio station that aired the two soap operas during the evening.  Will the person who contributed that fact please resend it, including the time that each program was aired (I think it was 8:30 and 8:45)?

 

5. If anyone can locate newspaper logs that show broadcast times of the other old-time radio programs that were part of the 1965 revival (The Fat Man, Dear Dorothea Dix and Hollywood Talking) I would like to include those in the article.

 

I do think that the logs several members have contributed will make great visuals in the article.  Thanks again to Ryan Ellett, Randy Watts, Bob Pederson, Jim Jones, Joe Webb, Rick Davenport and others who have contributed such a wealth of material to be incorporated into the article.

 

If you have an answer to any of the above questions, just post it here or send it to me personally if you would prefer.

 

Larry


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Larry Maupin
 

I think the four programs that were part of the 1975 revival might be a good subject for an article entitled "The Silver Age of Radio."  But the author would need to include CBS Radio Mystery Theater, and it would be a challenge to determine which of the 1400 or so episodes would be the most interesting to readers.  In my opinion the best category of them is those that were based on a short story or a novel by a great writer like Henry James (there are several episodes based on his short stories).

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday January 9 2021 8:02:06AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.

--
Larry Maupin


Re: Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Larry Maupin
 

Well that is one instance of  BBC episodes making their way into the library, perhaps in this case being waved in along with those produced in the U.S.

-----------------------------------------

From: "Brian Kavanaugh via groups.io"
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday January 8 2021 7:45:48PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

The Philip Marlowe maintained set has BBC episodes in it. There may be others.

On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 4:58 PM Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:
Scott, Springbok sounds interesting, and I have never heard of it before.  As for the BBC Sherlock Holmes episodes prior to 1962, I don't know.  I think the OTRR Library has some South African and some Australian programs from the old-time radio era, but I have not noticed anything from the BBC, Radio Canada, Radio France, Deutsche Welle or Radio Japan.  Someone else can perhaps better explain the principle of inclusion and exclusion followed by the library in determining what to add to the collection.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Mahan"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday January 8 2021 5:43:09PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

I have 210 BBC Sherlock Holmes episodes ranging from 1945 to 2010. Would we consider the 65 that are prior to 1962 OTR? Or is the BBC just BBC? And I have 47 Springbok episodes from the 80’s. You can’t not like Springbok (Squad Cars!) but you just can’t call it OTR. I kind-of think OTR is an American thing. Fun to talk about.

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> On Behalf Of Larry Maupin
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2021 9:26 AM
To: 'main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io' <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

 

Scott, I have dozens of BBC dramas on cassettes, and most of the ones I have listened to are very good.  I do not think that any are in the OTRR Library collection, probably because most people do not consider them to be old-time radio.

 

Thank you for your comments about The Little Things in Life.  It seems that you might think it qualifies as an old-time radio series.

 

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday January 8 2021 9:54:19AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Request for Fact-Checking Assistance

Although not American, the BBC never stopped doing drama. The CBC continued into the 1990's at least, and South Africa and Australia were doing OTR type shows into the 1980's. A treasure trove is out there, waiting to be listened to. More drama, adventure and comedy than anyone could listen to in two lifetimes. And most, if not all of it top quality productions.

S


--
Larry Maupin


--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Re: Download Radio Playhouse at https://www.otrr.org/OTRRLibrary/otrrlibrary.html

Paul Kornman
 

That Library web structure was set up years ago, and is a minor pain to keep updated. It's one of the reasons I went to the database-driven interface that is in the new location.

It's on my todo list - go through all those listings and note and then fix those links that need updating.

If anyone's interested in helping with this task, let me know.
What's involved:
1) click on each link to see if it's valid
2) If it's invalid, look at the list of valid folders (in a spreadsheet) and either note its proper location or mark it for deletion.

P.S. I'm expecting an influx of about 15,000 new (not OTRRPG) episodes into the Library in the coming weeks.

- Paul Kornman


Download Radio Playhouse at https://www.otrr.org/OTRRLibrary/otrrlibrary.html

David Oxford
 

I thought I’d point out that the Purchasing Group made 149 episodes available to the OTRR Library a year or so ago. When I went to 
http://otrrlibrary.org/r.html I couldn’t find the series. When I went to https://www.otrr.org/OTRRLibrary/otrrlibrary.html and did a search for Radio Playhouse the 149 files showed up.

The series is in excellent sound and can be freely downloaded.

Perhaps the link can be fixed.

David Oxford


Re: Ted has a collection of the 1975 shows

Scott Galley
 

As to whether or not this can be considered OTR or OTR revival, with regard to 'The Little Things in Life', Peg Lynch seemed to be recycling scripts (or at least script ideas) from her earlier show, 'The Couple Next Door'. I have seen an episode of the television show for the 1950's that matched the 1975 revival almost word for word, if I remember correctly.

Everyone seems to have their own interpretation of what Old Time Radio is. I for one, have never cared for the acronym OTR. I've always thought it sounded a tad corny. Just me. No hate mail please. I prefer to call it Golden Age Radio, as opposed to Contemporary Radio. As such, in my database, anything American pre-1962 is Golden Age. After that it Contemporary. So the 'Little Things in Life' is just a great example of Contemporary Radio.

It's easier for British Radio. When the BBC changed their call sign ons and frequencies in 1967, that's the cut off point for me. So, when in September of 1967 the BBC Light Programme became BBC Radio 2, the Golden Age ended and the Contemporary Age began. At least, that's how I log it.

1061 - 1080 of 3438