Discussion


Larry Maupin
 

I  read the posts of Rick, Ian and Barbara late last night with great interest and would like to thank all of you for enlivening the discussion about the final couple of days of old-time radio soap operas with your comments and reference sources. 

Ian asked for some information about Whispering Streets.  Jim Cox has an entry on it in his Historical Dictionary of American Radio Soap Operas (P.245), part of which I will quote here: "One of the last daytime narratives still airing on 'the day radio drama died', comparatively speaking it was one of only a handful of closed-end stories.  Initially its romantic tales were completed in 20-minute broadcasts.  By 1954, when the series became a quarter-hour feature the stories were serialized, traditionally opening on Monday and winding up on Friday of the same week."



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Larry Maupin


Ian Grieve
 

Larry, thank you.  I went to the library and spot checked some episodes of Whispering Streets.  They weren't Australian unfortunately.

An interesting point.  At first I incorrectly typed in otrr.net instead of otrr.org and was directed to otrcat.  Seems he is surrounding OTRR.

Ian

------ Original Message ------
From: "Larry Maupin" <lmaupin@...>
Sent: 17/04/2021 11:19:10 PM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Discussion

I  read the posts of Rick, Ian and Barbara late last night with great interest and would like to thank all of you for enlivening the discussion about the final couple of days of old-time radio soap operas with your comments and reference sources. 

Ian asked for some information about Whispering Streets.  Jim Cox has an entry on it in his Historical Dictionary of American Radio Soap Operas (P.245), part of which I will quote here: "One of the last daytime narratives still airing on 'the day radio drama died', comparatively speaking it was one of only a handful of closed-end stories.  Initially its romantic tales were completed in 20-minute broadcasts.  By 1954, when the series became a quarter-hour feature the stories were serialized, traditionally opening on Monday and winding up on Friday of the same week."



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Larry Maupin


Larry Maupin
 

You are welcome Ian.  I think the most interesting thing about this serial is that it is considered to be a soap opera by an authority such as Jim Cox and that episodes survive from both November 24th and 25th, 1960.  History has smiled upon it because it just happened to be in the right company at the right time.

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ian Grieve"
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Saturday April 17 2021 7:38:10PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Discussion

Larry, thank you.  I went to the library and spot checked some episodes of Whispering Streets.  They weren't Australian unfortunately.

An interesting point.  At first I incorrectly typed in otrr.net instead of otrr.org and was directed to otrcat.  Seems he is surrounding OTRR.

Ian

------ Original Message ------
From: "Larry Maupin" <lmaupin@...>
To: "'Main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io'" <Main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io>
Sent: 17/04/2021 11:19:10 PM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Discussion

I  read the posts of Rick, Ian and Barbara late last night with great interest and would like to thank all of you for enlivening the discussion about the final couple of days of old-time radio soap operas with your comments and reference sources. 

Ian asked for some information about Whispering Streets.  Jim Cox has an entry on it in his Historical Dictionary of American Radio Soap Operas (P.245), part of which I will quote here: "One of the last daytime narratives still airing on 'the day radio drama died', comparatively speaking it was one of only a handful of closed-end stories.  Initially its romantic tales were completed in 20-minute broadcasts.  By 1954, when the series became a quarter-hour feature the stories were serialized, traditionally opening on Monday and winding up on Friday of the same week."



--
Larry Maupin
--
Larry Maupin