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Episode Summary of "Second Generation" Audition Recording

Larry Maupin
 

Broadcast Date: November 11, 1954. NBC.

Summary: A quiz show in which panelists attempt to guess the identity of contestants' famous parents.  Panelists are actress Barbara Hale, sportswriter Dick Hyland of The Los Angeles Times, and actor Hans Conreid.  Jack McCoy is the host.  Clues are given to the panelists that have an association with the names they are to guess.

The first famous parent can be determined by combining two pieces of jewelry typically worn with French-style dress shirts with an epistolary missive.  Anyone who can guess it before listening to the episode gets a gold star.

One guest turns out to be the nephew of the great Chicago Bears quarterback Sid Luckman, and that isn't even his reason for being on the show.

The final famous parent seems sure to be Ronald Reagan but is instead another famous actor who starred as a football player in a movie entitled The Freshman.  Anyone who can guess his identity before listening to the episode gets two gold stars.  I invite everyone to take a shot at both answers.  You still get a gold star even if someone else posts the correct answer first if you add something to the discussion.

Notes: (1) This is so much fun to listen to, and the sound quality is very good; (2) The episode concludes with "This came to you from Hollywood, an NBC Radio Production."



--
Larry Maupin

William Davis
 

Sounds like something right up my alley, Larry, especially since I like game/quiz shows.  If you can, please include me for a copy of this one.

As for "The Freshman", this should be fairly easy for fans of silent comedy films.  He was one of most the famous silent comedians ever, famous for a string daredevil comedies in the mid- to-1920s.  During filming of these he fell in love with his leading lady and married her., and had 3 children, but only one son.  Father and son shared the same name - Harold Lloyd Sr. and Jr.

Harold Jr. followed his parents into the movies but was not very successful and soon gave up and moved from Hollywood back to his parents home. 

On Saturday, July 25, 2020, 08:55:52 AM EDT, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Broadcast Date: November 11, 1954. NBC.

Summary: A quiz show in which panelists attempt to guess the identity of contestants' famous parents.  Panelists are actress Barbara Hale, sportswriter Dick Hyland of The Los Angeles Times, and actor Hans Conreid.  Jack McCoy is the host.  Clues are given to the panelists that have an association with the names they are to guess.

The first famous parent can be determined by combining two pieces of jewelry typically worn with French-style dress shirts with an epistolary missive.  Anyone who can guess it before listening to the episode gets a gold star.

One guest turns out to be the nephew of the great Chicago Bears quarterback Sid Luckman, and that isn't even his reason for being on the show.

The final famous parent seems sure to be Ronald Reagan but is instead another famous actor who starred as a football player in a movie entitled The Freshman.  Anyone who can guess his identity before listening to the episode gets two gold stars.  I invite everyone to take a shot at both answers.  You still get a gold star even if someone else posts the correct answer first if you add something to the discussion.

Notes: (1) This is so much fun to listen to, and the sound quality is very good; (2) The episode concludes with "This came to you from Hollywood, an NBC Radio Production."



--
Larry Maupin

Larry Maupin
 

Hi Bill,

Well, you get two gold stars for being the first person to answer the question about the famous movie actor correctly!  I saw Harold Lloyd Sr. on Turner Classic Movies before my cable service dropped that channel, and I think he always wore black-framed glasses and seemed sad, but that is just my recollection.

I will be happy to send you copies of all fifteen of the audition recordings when I have completed reviews of all of them.  I'm not sure I can read your email address properly.  Is it lansingrailfan@...?  If not, please send me the correct one. 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "William Davis via groups.io"
To: "OTRRPurchasingGroup@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io", "Main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Saturday July 25 2020 4:20:41PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Episode Summary of "Second Generation" Audition Recording

Sounds like something right up my alley, Larry, especially since I like game/quiz shows.  If you can, please include me for a copy of this one.

As for "The Freshman", this should be fairly easy for fans of silent comedy films.  He was one of most the famous silent comedians ever, famous for a string daredevil comedies in the mid- to-1920s.  During filming of these he fell in love with his leading lady and married her., and had 3 children, but only one son.  Father and son shared the same name - Harold Lloyd Sr. and Jr.

Harold Jr. followed his parents into the movies but was not very successful and soon gave up and moved from Hollywood back to his parents home. 

On Saturday, July 25, 2020, 08:55:52 AM EDT, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Broadcast Date: November 11, 1954. NBC.

Summary: A quiz show in which panelists attempt to guess the identity of contestants' famous parents.  Panelists are actress Barbara Hale, sportswriter Dick Hyland of The Los Angeles Times, and actor Hans Conreid.  Jack McCoy is the host.  Clues are given to the panelists that have an association with the names they are to guess.

The first famous parent can be determined by combining two pieces of jewelry typically worn with French-style dress shirts with an epistolary missive.  Anyone who can guess it before listening to the episode gets a gold star.

One guest turns out to be the nephew of the great Chicago Bears quarterback Sid Luckman, and that isn't even his reason for being on the show.

The final famous parent seems sure to be Ronald Reagan but is instead another famous actor who starred as a football player in a movie entitled The Freshman.  Anyone who can guess his identity before listening to the episode gets two gold stars.  I invite everyone to take a shot at both answers.  You still get a gold star even if someone else posts the correct answer first if you add something to the discussion.

Notes: (1) This is so much fun to listen to, and the sound quality is very good; (2) The episode concludes with "This came to you from Hollywood, an NBC Radio Production."



--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin

William Davis
 

That is the correct email, Larry.

For a time as I recall, Time-Life was broadcasting Harold Sr.'s silent films on TV stations that could air them.  One of them was "The Freshman" so I was able it along with many others included in the package - and they were all outstanding.  Of course, one of the most famous films was "Safety Last" were had to climb a skyscraper while hanging onto a semi-detached clock on the building.

There was a secret connected to the climbing.  Four years earlier, 1919, he was to do a series of publicity photos for "Lonesome Luke" which he was playing in a series comedies.  Due to an accident, instead of the prop bombs he was to pose with were replaced by real ones.  Because of that Harold lost several fingers from his hand and nearly blinded by the explosion.  After a long recovery he was able to start working again when his vision returned.

As for the lost fingers, Harold was introduced to Samuel Goodwin (Yes that one!) who at the time was in the prosthetics business, who molded a prosthetic hand for him.  From that time on, Harold would only be in the closeups and in the longshots they shot a stunt double who was sworn to secrecy until Harold's passing.

Finally, for now anyway, Harold's estate is administered now by his grand daughter, who has been busy keeping the legacy alive and growing

On Saturday, July 25, 2020, 05:42:18 PM EDT, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Hi Bill,

Well, you get two gold stars for being the first person to answer the question about the famous movie actor correctly!  I saw Harold Lloyd Sr. on Turner Classic Movies before my cable service dropped that channel, and I think he always wore black-framed glasses and seemed sad, but that is just my recollection.

I will be happy to send you copies of all fifteen of the audition recordings when I have completed reviews of all of them.  I'm not sure I can read your email address properly.  Is it lansingrailfan@...?  If not, please send me the correct one. 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "William Davis via groups.io"
To: "OTRRPurchasingGroup@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io", "Main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Saturday July 25 2020 4:20:41PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Episode Summary of "Second Generation" Audition Recording

Sounds like something right up my alley, Larry, especially since I like game/quiz shows.  If you can, please include me for a copy of this one.

As for "The Freshman", this should be fairly easy for fans of silent comedy films.  He was one of most the famous silent comedians ever, famous for a string daredevil comedies in the mid- to-1920s.  During filming of these he fell in love with his leading lady and married her., and had 3 children, but only one son.  Father and son shared the same name - Harold Lloyd Sr. and Jr.

Harold Jr. followed his parents into the movies but was not very successful and soon gave up and moved from Hollywood back to his parents home. 

On Saturday, July 25, 2020, 08:55:52 AM EDT, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Broadcast Date: November 11, 1954. NBC.

Summary: A quiz show in which panelists attempt to guess the identity of contestants' famous parents.  Panelists are actress Barbara Hale, sportswriter Dick Hyland of The Los Angeles Times, and actor Hans Conreid.  Jack McCoy is the host.  Clues are given to the panelists that have an association with the names they are to guess.

The first famous parent can be determined by combining two pieces of jewelry typically worn with French-style dress shirts with an epistolary missive.  Anyone who can guess it before listening to the episode gets a gold star.

One guest turns out to be the nephew of the great Chicago Bears quarterback Sid Luckman, and that isn't even his reason for being on the show.

The final famous parent seems sure to be Ronald Reagan but is instead another famous actor who starred as a football player in a movie entitled The Freshman.  Anyone who can guess his identity before listening to the episode gets two gold stars.  I invite everyone to take a shot at both answers.  You still get a gold star even if someone else posts the correct answer first if you add something to the discussion.

Notes: (1) This is so much fun to listen to, and the sound quality is very good; (2) The episode concludes with "This came to you from Hollywood, an NBC Radio Production."



--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin

Larry Maupin
 

Thank you Bill for confirming your correct email address.  In reading your review I noticed that Lloyd married a woman he really loved, and I hope they stayed together and were happy during the rest of their lives.  Many if not most of us lament "the one that got away."  Some are more fortunate, and Lloyd seems to have been among those.

Of course on the subject of marriage and happiness, I think Oscar Wilde had the best line.  He wrote that there should be a special tax on bachelors because they are far happier than any other class of people.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "William Davis via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Sunday July 26 2020 1:41:40AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Episode Summary of "Second Generation" Audition Recording

That is the correct email, Larry.

For a time as I recall, Time-Life was broadcasting Harold Sr.'s silent films on TV stations that could air them.  One of them was "The Freshman" so I was able it along with many others included in the package - and they were all outstanding.  Of course, one of the most famous films was "Safety Last" were had to climb a skyscraper while hanging onto a semi-detached clock on the building.

There was a secret connected to the climbing.  Four years earlier, 1919, he was to do a series of publicity photos for "Lonesome Luke" which he was playing in a series comedies.  Due to an accident, instead of the prop bombs he was to pose with were replaced by real ones.  Because of that Harold lost several fingers from his hand and nearly blinded by the explosion.  After a long recovery he was able to start working again when his vision returned.

As for the lost fingers, Harold was introduced to Samuel Goodwin (Yes that one!) who at the time was in the prosthetics business, who molded a prosthetic hand for him.  From that time on, Harold would only be in the closeups and in the longshots they shot a stunt double who was sworn to secrecy until Harold's passing.

Finally, for now anyway, Harold's estate is administered now by his grand daughter, who has been busy keeping the legacy alive and growing

On Saturday, July 25, 2020, 05:42:18 PM EDT, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Hi Bill,

Well, you get two gold stars for being the first person to answer the question about the famous movie actor correctly!  I saw Harold Lloyd Sr. on Turner Classic Movies before my cable service dropped that channel, and I think he always wore black-framed glasses and seemed sad, but that is just my recollection.

I will be happy to send you copies of all fifteen of the audition recordings when I have completed reviews of all of them.  I'm not sure I can read your email address properly.  Is it lansingrailfan@...?  If not, please send me the correct one. 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "William Davis via groups.io"
To: "OTRRPurchasingGroup@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io", "Main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Saturday July 25 2020 4:20:41PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Episode Summary of "Second Generation" Audition Recording

Sounds like something right up my alley, Larry, especially since I like game/quiz shows.  If you can, please include me for a copy of this one.

As for "The Freshman", this should be fairly easy for fans of silent comedy films.  He was one of most the famous silent comedians ever, famous for a string daredevil comedies in the mid- to-1920s.  During filming of these he fell in love with his leading lady and married her., and had 3 children, but only one son.  Father and son shared the same name - Harold Lloyd Sr. and Jr.

Harold Jr. followed his parents into the movies but was not very successful and soon gave up and moved from Hollywood back to his parents home. 

On Saturday, July 25, 2020, 08:55:52 AM EDT, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Broadcast Date: November 11, 1954. NBC.

Summary: A quiz show in which panelists attempt to guess the identity of contestants' famous parents.  Panelists are actress Barbara Hale, sportswriter Dick Hyland of The Los Angeles Times, and actor Hans Conreid.  Jack McCoy is the host.  Clues are given to the panelists that have an association with the names they are to guess.

The first famous parent can be determined by combining two pieces of jewelry typically worn with French-style dress shirts with an epistolary missive.  Anyone who can guess it before listening to the episode gets a gold star.

One guest turns out to be the nephew of the great Chicago Bears quarterback Sid Luckman, and that isn't even his reason for being on the show.

The final famous parent seems sure to be Ronald Reagan but is instead another famous actor who starred as a football player in a movie entitled The Freshman.  Anyone who can guess his identity before listening to the episode gets two gold stars.  I invite everyone to take a shot at both answers.  You still get a gold star even if someone else posts the correct answer first if you add something to the discussion.

Notes: (1) This is so much fun to listen to, and the sound quality is very good; (2) The episode concludes with "This came to you from Hollywood, an NBC Radio Production."



--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin

jackies@tularosa.net
 

Larry:

I don't know if Bachelors are happy than married people. I have been
married for 50 years as of July 8th and I still love the man I married.
No jokes please I have had people if it was my second or third marriage
and I tell them my only marriage. We were married at 19. My husband had
to get his parents permission to marry and they did not want to give it
and he told them then we will go to a state that will let us marry at 19
without my having to have permission. Funny thing is my mother in law
eloped with my father in law when she was 16. So they didn't have
anything to say about it.

Jackie

William Davis
 

Jackie,I'll be 68 in November and I've been married for the grand total of almost three years to the same woman.  Other than that stupid mistake (better left undiscussed), I'm not missing her even though the divorce was 22 years
ago.  Am I happier now?  Not really.

On Monday, July 27, 2020, 02:49:32 AM EDT, jackies@... via groups.io <jackies@...> wrote:


Larry:

I don't know if Bachelors are happy than married people.  I have been
married for 50 years as of July 8th and I still love the man I married.
No jokes please I have had people if it was my second or third marriage
and I tell them my only marriage.  We were married at 19.  My husband had
to get his parents permission to marry and they did not want to give it
and he told them then we will go to a state that will let us marry at 19
without my having to have permission.  Funny thing is my mother in law
eloped with my father in law when she was 16.  So they didn't have
anything to say about it.

Jackie