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Here’s Flash Casey 1938

barry nadler
 

I watched Here’s Flash Casey 1938

on Amazon Prime video. 


Perhaps this led to the OTR show. 


This review gives an excellent description. 

Thank you Martin Hafer. 


From IMDB 


Excerpts from 

MartinHafer 23 December 2014


Here’s Flash Casey 1938


The film begins with Flash in college working hard to make it through the school and get his degree--all by pluck and determination. However, when he graduates, he has a hard time getting work and has to content himself with a skinflint boss. What he didn't realize is that additionally many of his pictures ended up getting stolen by some unscrupulous jerks who developed his film-- folks who also were operating a blackmail racket! Can Flash sort all this out and save the day? What do you think?!



--
Marc Olayne

Ryan Ellett
 

Nice catch, Marc. IMDB says it was written by George Harmon Coxe, the man behind Casey, Crime Photographer. Joe Webb has been researching that series, maybe he's familiar with this film and how it relates to the later radio program.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Thursday, April 30, 2020, 03:58:50 AM CDT, marc19olayne39 via groups.io <marc19olayne39@...> wrote:


I watched Here’s Flash Casey 1938

on Amazon Prime video. 


Perhaps this led to the OTR show. 


This review gives an excellent description. 

Thank you Martin Hafer. 


From IMDB 


Excerpts from 

MartinHafer 23 December 2014


Here’s Flash Casey 1938


The film begins with Flash in college working hard to make it through the school and get his degree--all by pluck and determination. However, when he graduates, he has a hard time getting work and has to content himself with a skinflint boss. What he didn't realize is that additionally many of his pictures ended up getting stolen by some unscrupulous jerks who developed his film-- folks who also were operating a blackmail racket! Can Flash sort all this out and save the day? What do you think?!



--
Marc Olayne

Scott Galley
 

I am a HUGE fan of George Harmon Coxe, and have read a number of his mysteries. Interestingly, Flash Casey is not his only newspaper photographer cum amateur sleuth. His first (and arguably, his best) is a character named Kent Murdock. He appeared in many, many mores stories than Flash Casey did. The novels are uniformly excellent. I don't think the character was ever in any other media. I've always found it odd that you'd have two characters that were identical in so many ways, but what do i know? 

Interestingly, it was a cassette of Casey Crime Photographer ("Christmas Shopping", which we listen to faithfully, every holiday season - I know it like the back of my hand) that got me into old time radio, which got me into crime novels of the 1930's-1950's, which got me into early television crime shows, which... one dot connects to another.

There was also a novel about Casey, Ann Williams and Ethelbert, entitled Dead Heat (1950), by Paul Ayres. A 'novelization', based on one of the radio episodes. I know which one, but can't remember just now. See the photo attached.

I've had the book for well over a decade but have yet to read it. Once I'm done 'Boys Will Be Boys" (1947), maybe I'll crack the spine of this one. We shall see.

60994597292__3B41BA50-2993-4D6D-A67F-3A1CDBEC9ADA.jpeg


Yours faithfully,
Scott

C. Nava
 

Hi Scott,

I love old mysteries! Thanks for an author I haven’t read yet. Which book comes first in the Kent Murdoch series?

Claire
Eglantyne2@...


From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> on behalf of Scott Galley via groups.io <scottgalley@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 30, 2020 6:32:47 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Cc: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Here’s Flash Casey 1938
 
I am a HUGE fan of George Harmon Coxe, and have read a number of his mysteries. Interestingly, Flash Casey is not his only newspaper photographer cum amateur sleuth. His first (and arguably, his best) is a character named Kent Murdock. He appeared in many, many mores stories than Flash Casey did. The novels are uniformly excellent. I don't think the character was ever in any other media. I've always found it odd that you'd have two characters that were identical in so many ways, but what do i know? 

Interestingly, it was a cassette of Casey Crime Photographer ("Christmas Shopping", which we listen to faithfully, every holiday season - I know it like the back of my hand) that got me into old time radio, which got me into crime novels of the 1930's-1950's, which got me into early television crime shows, which... one dot connects to another.

There was also a novel about Casey, Ann Williams and Ethelbert, entitled Dead Heat (1950), by Paul Ayres. A 'novelization', based on one of the radio episodes. I know which one, but can't remember just now. See the photo attached.

I've had the book for well over a decade but have yet to read it. Once I'm done 'Boys Will Be Boys" (1947), maybe I'll crack the spine of this one. We shall see.

60994597292__3B41BA50-2993-4D6D-A67F-3A1CDBEC9ADA.jpeg


Yours faithfully,
Scott

Scott Galley
 

Hi Claire!

The appropriately titled "Murder With Pictures" (1935). I read a dog-eared copy from the 1980's, but picked up a beautiful slip covered first edition years ago, quite inexpensively, if memory serves.

Most of George Harmon Coxe's books were also issued as stunning Dell Mapback pocketbooks (expensive) and hardcover bookclub editions (cheap), which don't have value on the collector's market, but who cares? They're usually found easily on eBay and look great on a shelf, along with being a grand read.


Yours faithfully,
Scott

C. Nava
 

Thanks, Scott. I just ordered it on ThriftBooks.com.

I appreciate the "new" author recommendation!

Best,

Claire




From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io> on behalf of Scott Galley via groups.io <scottgalley@...>
Sent: Friday, May 1, 2020 10:13 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Cc: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io <main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Here’s Flash Casey 1938
 
Hi Claire!

The appropriately titled "Murder With Pictures" (1935). I read a dog-eared copy from the 1980's, but picked up a beautiful slip covered first edition years ago, quite inexpensively, if memory serves.

Most of George Harmon Coxe's books were also issued as stunning Dell Mapback pocketbooks (expensive) and hardcover bookclub editions (cheap), which don't have value on the collector's market, but who cares? They're usually found easily on eBay and look great on a shelf, along with being a grand read.


Yours faithfully,
Scott

Joe Webb
 

According to the Siegel & Cox book (p167), "Dead Heat" is based on the Casey episode, "Pick-Up"
There is a summary of the episode at https://bluenotebulletin.blogspot.com/2020/01/1947-05-22-pick-up.html
"Pick-Up" is a Cole script -- does the book give any mention to him? As best as we can tell, Cole never copyrighted his Casey scripts, and neither did CBS! But since the novel was published in 1950, you'd think there'd be some "memory" that the plotline came from Cole. The novel is jointly copyrighted by CBS and Coxe.

As for the movies, they are not really the Casey of the Black Mask pulp stories, but changed to amuse a movie audience. They did not do well at the box office or with the critics. "Women Trouble" was 1936 with Stu Erwin. "Here's Flash Casey" was in 1937. I have them... and had difficulty sitting through them... being thankful for the radio version of the character.

--

Scott Galley
 

Hello Joe;

The first of the films, if I'm not mistaken (going on memory here) is "Murder with Pictures" (1936) with Lew Ayers. That's officially a 'Kent Murdock' book, but again, six-of-one, half-a-dozen of the other when it comes to Casey and/or Kent. I like the George Harmon Coxe films. B-Films all, with unnecessary comic relief, at least to modern viewers (and to me, if truth be told). They're not the same as the radio portrayal, but if a film has anything to do with radio, regardless of how tenuous that connection is, I'm predisposed to liking it. And if it takes place in a radio studio, then you've got me, no matter how bad the film may be.

As for "Dead Heat", the Edition Page (Copyright Page) states:

COPYRIGHT, 1950, BY COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM AND GEORGE HARMON COXE
(Their capitals, not mine)

My wife and I listened to the surviving run of Casey faithfully, every Thursday, a couple of years ago, but as I've just finished my previous book and was sniffing around yesterday, undecided as to my next book, I'll read 'Dead Heat' and then re-listen to 'Pick-Up' and let you know how they compare, if you're at all interested.

Yours faithfully,
Scott

Scott Galley
 

My pleasure, Claire. I hope you enjoy it. If you do, let me know and I can give you a few other GHC recommendations.

Yours faithfully,
Scott