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HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1


Larry Maupin
 

Series: Unwritten Law

Episode Title: "The Case of the Ladies' Directory"

Broadcast Date: July 24, 1998

Network: BBC Radio 2

Background: By the mid 1950s Great Britain had begun efforts to deal with the problem of prostitution by updating laws governing the occupation.  These included The Sexual Offenses Act of 1956, The Obscene Publications Act of 1959 and The Street Offenses Act of 1959.  

The Case: Frederick Charles Shaw was charged with conspiracy to corrupt public morals because he published a magazine entitled The Ladies' Directory which was intended to provide prostitutes with a legal means of advertising.  Prosecuting attorneys disagreed, accusing Shaw and others of conspiring "to debauch and corrupt the morals of youth and diverse other subjects of the Queen, and to raise and create in their minds inordinate lustful desires."

Significance: The case eventually found its way to the Supreme Court of Great Britain, with the issues being whether prostitution should continue to be a legal profession and, if so, by what means should "ladies of the night" be permitted to advertise.  One important matter addressed by the court was the fact that juries usually refused outright to convict prostitutes, so what good were laws that were so out of touch with the sentiment of the electorate that they seldom led to convictions? 

Outcome: I will leave it to listeners to learn Shaw's fate, but one indication of the case's importance is that it led the court's Chief Justice himself to ponder the difficulty of adjudicating cases in which the laws conflict so sharply with public opinion.  The question was even raised as to whether landlords who rented to prostitutes should be prosecuted under The Street Offenses Act of 1959 because the money for the rent itself was earned by an activity that corrupted public morals.  The Chief Justice finally summed up the court's dilemma by stating that "where Parliament fears to tread it is not for the courts to rush in."

Conclusion: This seems to have left matters up in the air, but it is clear that prostitution remained legal and that advertising in printed publications survived the effort to suppress The Ladies' Directory and other material of the same kind.  Women of relaxed virtue were allowed to continue characterizing themselves as dancers, massage therapists, and anything else that sounded legitimate and respectable with impunity.  

--
Larry Maupin


Rosalie Lunger
 

I just got it 40 mins ago, sorry..And I just got on the net..
" People keep asking me how things are going, like I ever knew what was going on in the first place."



Disclaimer
All movies/music/books we send are for evaluation purposes. 
We receive NO financial gain from sharing these movies/music with you. 
These movies/music are copyrighted by the artists and/or their companies. 
This is a *NON PROFIT* List. 
~Fair Use Act~
In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is being distributed under fair use without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for non-profit research and educational or criticism purpose only.
Copyrights retained by the original artist.
No copyright infringement intended.


Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 3:12 PM Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:
Series: Unwritten Law

Episode Title: "The Case of the Ladies' Directory"

Broadcast Date: July 24, 1998

Network: BBC Radio 2

Background: By the mid 1950s Great Britain had begun efforts to deal with the problem of prostitution by updating laws governing the occupation.  These included The Sexual Offenses Act of 1956, The Obscene Publications Act of 1959 and The Street Offenses Act of 1959.  

The Case: Frederick Charles Shaw was charged with conspiracy to corrupt public morals because he published a magazine entitled The Ladies' Directory which was intended to provide prostitutes with a legal means of advertising.  Prosecuting attorneys disagreed, accusing Shaw and others of conspiring "to debauch and corrupt the morals of youth and diverse other subjects of the Queen, and to raise and create in their minds inordinate lustful desires."

Significance: The case eventually found its way to the Supreme Court of Great Britain, with the issues being whether prostitution should continue to be a legal profession and, if so, by what means should "ladies of the night" be permitted to advertise.  One important matter addressed by the court was the fact that juries usually refused outright to convict prostitutes, so what good were laws that were so out of touch with the sentiment of the electorate that they seldom led to convictions? 

Outcome: I will leave it to listeners to learn Shaw's fate, but one indication of the case's importance is that it led the court's Chief Justice himself to ponder the difficulty of adjudicating cases in which the laws conflict so sharply with public opinion.  The question was even raised as to whether landlords who rented to prostitutes should be prosecuted under The Street Offenses Act of 1959 because the money for the rent itself was earned by an activity that corrupted public morals.  The Chief Justice finally summed up the court's dilemma by stating that "where Parliament fears to tread it is not for the courts to rush in."

Conclusion: This seems to have left matters up in the air, but it is clear that prostitution remained legal and that advertising in printed publications survived the effort to suppress The Ladies' Directory and other material of the same kind.  Women of relaxed virtue were allowed to continue characterizing themselves as dancers, massage therapists, and anything else that sounded legitimate and respectable with impunity.  

--
Larry Maupin


Virus-free. www.avast.com


John Nicholson
 

Thanks for the review. I look forward to your posting the shows and other reviews.

John Nicholson 

On Sep 27, 2020, at 2:12 PM, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

Series: Unwritten Law

Episode Title: "The Case of the Ladies' Directory"

Broadcast Date: July 24, 1998

Network: BBC Radio 2

Background: By the mid 1950s Great Britain had begun efforts to deal with the problem of prostitution by updating laws governing the occupation.  These included The Sexual Offenses Act of 1956, The Obscene Publications Act of 1959 and The Street Offenses Act of 1959.  

The Case: Frederick Charles Shaw was charged with conspiracy to corrupt public morals because he published a magazine entitled The Ladies' Directory which was intended to provide prostitutes with a legal means of advertising.  Prosecuting attorneys disagreed, accusing Shaw and others of conspiring "to debauch and corrupt the morals of youth and diverse other subjects of the Queen, and to raise and create in their minds inordinate lustful desires."

Significance: The case eventually found its way to the Supreme Court of Great Britain, with the issues being whether prostitution should continue to be a legal profession and, if so, by what means should "ladies of the night" be permitted to advertise.  One important matter addressed by the court was the fact that juries usually refused outright to convict prostitutes, so what good were laws that were so out of touch with the sentiment of the electorate that they seldom led to convictions? 

Outcome: I will leave it to listeners to learn Shaw's fate, but one indication of the case's importance is that it led the court's Chief Justice himself to ponder the difficulty of adjudicating cases in which the laws conflict so sharply with public opinion.  The question was even raised as to whether landlords who rented to prostitutes should be prosecuted under The Street Offenses Act of 1959 because the money for the rent itself was earned by an activity that corrupted public morals.  The Chief Justice finally summed up the court's dilemma by stating that "where Parliament fears to tread it is not for the courts to rush in."

Conclusion: This seems to have left matters up in the air, but it is clear that prostitution remained legal and that advertising in printed publications survived the effort to suppress The Ladies' Directory and other material of the same kind.  Women of relaxed virtue were allowed to continue characterizing themselves as dancers, massage therapists, and anything else that sounded legitimate and respectable with impunity.  

--
Larry Maupin


Larry Maupin
 

I'm glad you received it Rosalie.  Your quotation reminds me of something I used to say when I was in the insurance business and attended a lot of meetings.  Someone would come up to me and ask, "What's going on?" and I would reply "I don't know.  I just got here."

I hope you read all the summaries and enjoy them.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Rosalie Lunger"
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 27 2020 3:54:28PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I just got it 40 mins ago, sorry..And I just got on the net..
" People keep asking me how things are going, like I ever knew what was going on in the first place."



Disclaimer
All movies/music/books we send are for evaluation purposes. 
We receive NO financial gain from sharing these movies/music with you. 
These movies/music are copyrighted by the artists and/or their companies. 
This is a *NON PROFIT* List. 
~Fair Use Act~
In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is being distributed under fair use without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for non-profit research and educational or criticism purpose only.
Copyrights retained by the original artist.
No copyright infringement intended.


Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 3:12 PM Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:
Series: Unwritten Law

Episode Title: "The Case of the Ladies' Directory"

Broadcast Date: July 24, 1998

Network: BBC Radio 2

Background: By the mid 1950s Great Britain had begun efforts to deal with the problem of prostitution by updating laws governing the occupation.  These included The Sexual Offenses Act of 1956, The Obscene Publications Act of 1959 and The Street Offenses Act of 1959.  

The Case: Frederick Charles Shaw was charged with conspiracy to corrupt public morals because he published a magazine entitled The Ladies' Directory which was intended to provide prostitutes with a legal means of advertising.  Prosecuting attorneys disagreed, accusing Shaw and others of conspiring "to debauch and corrupt the morals of youth and diverse other subjects of the Queen, and to raise and create in their minds inordinate lustful desires."

Significance: The case eventually found its way to the Supreme Court of Great Britain, with the issues being whether prostitution should continue to be a legal profession and, if so, by what means should "ladies of the night" be permitted to advertise.  One important matter addressed by the court was the fact that juries usually refused outright to convict prostitutes, so what good were laws that were so out of touch with the sentiment of the electorate that they seldom led to convictions? 

Outcome: I will leave it to listeners to learn Shaw's fate, but one indication of the case's importance is that it led the court's Chief Justice himself to ponder the difficulty of adjudicating cases in which the laws conflict so sharply with public opinion.  The question was even raised as to whether landlords who rented to prostitutes should be prosecuted under The Street Offenses Act of 1959 because the money for the rent itself was earned by an activity that corrupted public morals.  The Chief Justice finally summed up the court's dilemma by stating that "where Parliament fears to tread it is not for the courts to rush in."

Conclusion: This seems to have left matters up in the air, but it is clear that prostitution remained legal and that advertising in printed publications survived the effort to suppress The Ladies' Directory and other material of the same kind.  Women of relaxed virtue were allowed to continue characterizing themselves as dancers, massage therapists, and anything else that sounded legitimate and respectable with impunity.  

--
Larry Maupin


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Larry Maupin


Larry Maupin
 

You are welcome John.  Please share any comments you have on the reviews as you read them.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "John Nicholson"
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 27 2020 4:22:10PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Thanks for the review. I look forward to your posting the shows and other reviews.

John Nicholson 

On Sep 27, 2020, at 2:12 PM, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

Series: Unwritten Law

Episode Title: "The Case of the Ladies' Directory"

Broadcast Date: July 24, 1998

Network: BBC Radio 2

Background: By the mid 1950s Great Britain had begun efforts to deal with the problem of prostitution by updating laws governing the occupation.  These included The Sexual Offenses Act of 1956, The Obscene Publications Act of 1959 and The Street Offenses Act of 1959.  

The Case: Frederick Charles Shaw was charged with conspiracy to corrupt public morals because he published a magazine entitled The Ladies' Directory which was intended to provide prostitutes with a legal means of advertising.  Prosecuting attorneys disagreed, accusing Shaw and others of conspiring "to debauch and corrupt the morals of youth and diverse other subjects of the Queen, and to raise and create in their minds inordinate lustful desires."

Significance: The case eventually found its way to the Supreme Court of Great Britain, with the issues being whether prostitution should continue to be a legal profession and, if so, by what means should "ladies of the night" be permitted to advertise.  One important matter addressed by the court was the fact that juries usually refused outright to convict prostitutes, so what good were laws that were so out of touch with the sentiment of the electorate that they seldom led to convictions? 

Outcome: I will leave it to listeners to learn Shaw's fate, but one indication of the case's importance is that it led the court's Chief Justice himself to ponder the difficulty of adjudicating cases in which the laws conflict so sharply with public opinion.  The question was even raised as to whether landlords who rented to prostitutes should be prosecuted under The Street Offenses Act of 1959 because the money for the rent itself was earned by an activity that corrupted public morals.  The Chief Justice finally summed up the court's dilemma by stating that "where Parliament fears to tread it is not for the courts to rush in."

Conclusion: This seems to have left matters up in the air, but it is clear that prostitution remained legal and that advertising in printed publications survived the effort to suppress The Ladies' Directory and other material of the same kind.  Women of relaxed virtue were allowed to continue characterizing themselves as dancers, massage therapists, and anything else that sounded legitimate and respectable with impunity.  

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


M Myers
 

Yep. He was already short with me


On Sep 28, 2020, at 8:12 AM, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

I'm glad you received it Rosalie.  Your quotation reminds me of something I used to say when I was in the insurance business and attended a lot of meetings.  Someone would come up to me and ask, "What's going on?" and I would reply "I don't know.  I just got here."

I hope you read all the summaries and enjoy them.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Rosalie Lunger"
To: main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Sunday September 27 2020 3:54:28PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I just got it 40 mins ago, sorry..And I just got on the net..
" People keep asking me how things are going, like I ever knew what was going on in the first place."



Disclaimer
All movies/music/books we send are for evaluation purposes. 
We receive NO financial gain from sharing these movies/music with you. 
These movies/music are copyrighted by the artists and/or their companies. 
This is a *NON PROFIT* List. 
~Fair Use Act~
In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work in this message is being distributed under fair use without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for non-profit research and educational or criticism purpose only.
Copyrights retained by the original artist.
No copyright infringement intended.


Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Sun, Sep 27, 2020 at 3:12 PM Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:
Series: Unwritten Law

Episode Title: "The Case of the Ladies' Directory"

Broadcast Date: July 24, 1998

Network: BBC Radio 2

Background: By the mid 1950s Great Britain had begun efforts to deal with the problem of prostitution by updating laws governing the occupation.  These included The Sexual Offenses Act of 1956, The Obscene Publications Act of 1959 and The Street Offenses Act of 1959.  

The Case: Frederick Charles Shaw was charged with conspiracy to corrupt public morals because he published a magazine entitled The Ladies' Directory which was intended to provide prostitutes with a legal means of advertising.  Prosecuting attorneys disagreed, accusing Shaw and others of conspiring "to debauch and corrupt the morals of youth and diverse other subjects of the Queen, and to raise and create in their minds inordinate lustful desires."

Significance: The case eventually found its way to the Supreme Court of Great Britain, with the issues being whether prostitution should continue to be a legal profession and, if so, by what means should "ladies of the night" be permitted to advertise.  One important matter addressed by the court was the fact that juries usually refused outright to convict prostitutes, so what good were laws that were so out of touch with the sentiment of the electorate that they seldom led to convictions? 

Outcome: I will leave it to listeners to learn Shaw's fate, but one indication of the case's importance is that it led the court's Chief Justice himself to ponder the difficulty of adjudicating cases in which the laws conflict so sharply with public opinion.  The question was even raised as to whether landlords who rented to prostitutes should be prosecuted under The Street Offenses Act of 1959 because the money for the rent itself was earned by an activity that corrupted public morals.  The Chief Justice finally summed up the court's dilemma by stating that "where Parliament fears to tread it is not for the courts to rush in."

Conclusion: This seems to have left matters up in the air, but it is clear that prostitution remained legal and that advertising in printed publications survived the effort to suppress The Ladies' Directory and other material of the same kind.  Women of relaxed virtue were allowed to continue characterizing themselves as dancers, massage therapists, and anything else that sounded legitimate and respectable with impunity.  

--
Larry Maupin


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Larry Maupin


Scott Galley
 

The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott


Larry Maupin
 

Scott, your message is replete with interesting details and suggestions.  I know that Radio Spirits has put together a lot of attractively packaged sets, but I have not purchased anything from it in years.  I think the prices are too high, and sometimes have been disappointed in the audio quality of its recordings.  Others may still like it because the illustrations on the boxes would make a collection of them look nice in a display case or on a mantle.

As for contemporary British radio, I agree that it is a wonderful source of dramatic programs.  I am including three post-1967 series in the curated set I am working on for that very reason.  I think these can qualify under the CBS Radio Mystery Theater exception because David is in the process of certifying that collection, and all the episodes in it were aired after 1962.  I also have dozens of episodes of series such as Saturday Night at the Movies, Saturday Night Theatre, Play of the Week  and Playhouse BBC on cassettes that could comprise a curated set but would probably have to be placed on the Internet Archive because they are not considered old-time radio programs and are all British.

As for curated collections of American Golden Age radio, I think your idea is a good one.  The best thing about these is that there are so many different ways to group episodes into collections that we could have many of them if other members decide to curate their own.  It could be a type of character as you suggest.  I have noticed that there are many characters like Shuffle Shober in Ma Perkins who sound like an ignorant bumpkin but are credited with a homespun wisdom and a good heart, and sometimes turn out to be right on moral issues.  Then there is the seductive homewrecker like Regina Rawlings in Backstage Wife and Alec Ransom in Road of Life

I will stop here, but thank you for the post and I hope other members will have something to say on this topic. 

Larry 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Scott Galley via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Friday October 2 2020 7:58:39AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin


mcoates
 

I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott


Ryan Ellett
 

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott


Larry Maupin
 

I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin


Mike Thomas
 

Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin


Larry Maupin
 

Thank you for your reply and encouragement, Mike.  Anyone who reads your post and who belonged to the group back when Jim was running it may be grateful, as I am, for all the good memories it evokes.

I first joined in late 2005, and when I read the mission statement I felt like the group must have been created just for me.  I was so excited that I held my breath hoping that my application would be accepted.  After joining I tried to become involved right away but none of the group leaders seemed interested until a man named Ed (sorry I can't remember his name after all these years) took me on as a proofreader of the certification document he was working on at the time.  After that I always had as much work as I could handle.

Like you, I became involved in distros and increased my collection substantially through participation in those.  It's true that the sound quality of some of them was really poor, but being able to acquire such treasures as The A&P Gypsies and The Bill Kemp Show and Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons was wonderful.

Also, the certified collections seemed to me then, and still do, an important part of the group's overall mission statement.  I was proud to play even a small role in several of them.

Today, I think that producing what Ryan refers to as "Moderated/Certified sets" is probably the group's most important function.  But I hope that curated collections put together by individual members, though perhaps less ambitious and time-consuming, may also come to be considered important.  In one of Paul Kornman's posts I think he mentioned something like an "OTRR RECOMMENDS" section that would direct browsers to these curated sets when they are still new as something different to listen to and enjoy.  Maybe we could even put a counter on them to track how many times they have been viewed and downloaded.  Each of them, as I envision them, will be accompanied by a paragraph explaining the theme of the collection (another of Paul's ideas) and I am planning to submit a one-sentence description of each episode that will help viewers decide whether it seems interesting enough to listen to.  For the Crime Classics episode on William Palmer, for example, the phrase "trust not the physician" might be the only thing necessary-- not even a full sentence.

Larry



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Mike Thomas via groups.io"
To: "Larry Maupin", "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Tuesday October 6 2020 10:48:35AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Mike Thomas
 

Fabulous! I think that mist have been Ed Selhorst. That's who I worked with on several detective series. Marlowe, Dragnet YTJD, Barrie Craig etc. I wrote some bios. That was the research stuff I was doing and how I contributed. Under  the radar and Under Ed. Lots of listening too. Lots of fun. 


On Tue, Oct 6, 2020 at 11:30 AM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
Thank you for your reply and encouragement, Mike.  Anyone who reads your post and who belonged to the group back when Jim was running it may be grateful, as I am, for all the good memories it evokes.

I first joined in late 2005, and when I read the mission statement I felt like the group must have been created just for me.  I was so excited that I held my breath hoping that my application would be accepted.  After joining I tried to become involved right away but none of the group leaders seemed interested until a man named Ed (sorry I can't remember his name after all these years) took me on as a proofreader of the certification document he was working on at the time.  After that I always had as much work as I could handle.

Like you, I became involved in distros and increased my collection substantially through participation in those.  It's true that the sound quality of some of them was really poor, but being able to acquire such treasures as The A&P Gypsies and The Bill Kemp Show and Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons was wonderful.

Also, the certified collections seemed to me then, and still do, an important part of the group's overall mission statement.  I was proud to play even a small role in several of them.

Today, I think that producing what Ryan refers to as "Moderated/Certified sets" is probably the group's most important function.  But I hope that curated collections put together by individual members, though perhaps less ambitious and time-consuming, may also come to be considered important.  In one of Paul Kornman's posts I think he mentioned something like an "OTRR RECOMMENDS" section that would direct browsers to these curated sets when they are still new as something different to listen to and enjoy.  Maybe we could even put a counter on them to track how many times they have been viewed and downloaded.  Each of them, as I envision them, will be accompanied by a paragraph explaining the theme of the collection (another of Paul's ideas) and I am planning to submit a one-sentence description of each episode that will help viewers decide whether it seems interesting enough to listen to.  For the Crime Classics episode on William Palmer, for example, the phrase "trust not the physician" might be the only thing necessary-- not even a full sentence.

Larry



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Mike Thomas via groups.io"
To: "Larry Maupin", "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Tuesday October 6 2020 10:48:35AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Richard Davenport
 

It was asked by Larry if any eps of the show Ma Perkins survive....I have 422 shows (not cleaned up and de-duped and names cleaned up,etc)  if the date of the show was known I could check if I have it...

Rick

Labor ipse voluptas


On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 7:20:50 PM CDT, Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims@...> wrote:


Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that. It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin


Larry Maupin
 

Hi Rick.  I was thinking of any surviving episodes that might deal with the death of Ma's son John.  I do not know if there are any, and have no idea of the date except that we could probably rule out all dates prior to the beginning of the U.S. military involvement in World War II.  The best clue would be an episode title that refers to John.

Thank you for the post.  I hope everything is going well in Dallas.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Richard Davenport"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday October 7 2020 2:55:42AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

It was asked by Larry if any eps of the show Ma Perkins survive....I have 422 shows (not cleaned up and de-duped and names cleaned up,etc)  if the date of the show was known I could check if I have it...

Rick

Labor ipse voluptas


On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 7:20:50 PM CDT, Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims@...> wrote:


Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


Richard Davenport
 

Larry,
I don't have a ton of Ma Perkins.  I did not see one with the name John in the titles. Here is what I have.

================================
M:\OTR Radio Shows\M\Ma Perkins\
================================
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 00-00-00 - Ma Ed Discuss Sylvester (aka 1950-10-15).mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 00-00-00 - What Ever Became of ... Ma Perkins.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 44-00-00 -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 45-08-10 - Powell Can Find Little Good In Stella.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 49-08-30 - Title Unknown.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 49-11-14 -.mpga
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 50-08-28 - Shuffles Leaves To Find Proof.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 50-08-29 - .mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 50-08-31 - .mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 51-02-19 - A N A L I.MP3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 60-11-24 - Second To Last Episode.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 60-11-24 - Thanksgiving - Last Show.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0000 - 60-11-24 - The Next-To-Last Eisode Of The Series.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0001 - 00-00-00 - .mp3
Ma Perkins - 0002 - 00-00-00 -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0003 - 00-00-00 - .mp3
Ma Perkins - 0004 - 00-00-00 -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0005 - 00-00-00 - Sonia Fades Out.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0006 - 00-00-00 - Sonia Is Shot.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0007 - 00-00-00 - Willy Evie Lie To Ma.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0423 - 35-00-00 -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 0424 - 35-00-00 -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4207 - 49-09-27 - Joseph Tells His Story.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4208 - 49-09-28 - What Junior Saw.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4209 - 49-09-29 - News Travels Fast.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4210 - 49-09-30 - Big Date.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4211 - 49-10-03 - Sinclair Drops By.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4212 - 49-10-04 - Dinner And Dancing.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4213 - 49-10-05 - Midnight Boat Ride.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4214 - 49-10-06 - Stranded.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4215 - 49-10-07 - Questioned By Police.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4216 - 49-10-10 - Positive I D.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4217 - 49-10-11 - Mayor Ross Complains.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4218 - 49-10-12 - Joseph Upset.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4219 - 49-10-13 - Ann Won't Answer Phone.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4220 - 49-10-14 - Joseph Goes To Hotel.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4221 - 49-10-17 - Sinclair Talks To Joseph.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4222 - 49-10-18 - Joseph Missing.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4223 - 49-10-19 - Mr Sinclair Refuses To Leave.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4224 - 49-10-20 - Joseph Returns Home.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4225 - 49-10-21 - Tells Ma About Fight.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4226 - 49-10-24 - Wanted By The Law.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4227 - 49-10-25 - The Mayor Calls.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4228 - 49-10-26 - Meeting With The Mayor.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4229 - 49-10-27 - Mr Sinclair Reassures Ma.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4230 - 49-10-28 - Augustus Blackmailed.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4231 - 49-10-31 - Invited To Dinner.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4232 - 49-11-01 - A Body Has Fallen Out Of A Hotel Widow.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4233 - 49-11-02 - Tells Ma About Losing Job.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4234 - 49-11-03 - Joseph Won't Stay For Dinner.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4235 - 49-11-04 - Ann Receives A Telegram.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4236 - 49-11-07 - Plans To Leave.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4237 - 49-11-08 - Brad Gorman Appears.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4238 - 49-11-09 - Brad Falls Out The Window.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4239 - 49-11-10 - Brad Dies.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4240 - 49-11-11 - Evey Tells About The Accident.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4241 - 49-11-14 - Joseph Told To Keep Quiet.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4242 - 49-11-15 - Ma Supports Sinclair.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4243 - 49-11-16 - Ma Askes For The Truth.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4244 - 49-11-17 - Constable Questions Sinclair.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4245 - 49-11-18 - Mysterious Phone Call.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4246 - 49-11-21 - Identity Discovered.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4247 - 49-11-22 - Joseph Learns About Gorman.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4248 - 49-11-23 - Joseph Reminded To Keep Quiet.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4251 - 49-11-28 - Ma Asks For Truth Again.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4252 - 49-11-29 - Fay Talks To Joseph.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4253 - 49-11-30 - Inquest Begins.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4254 - 49-12-01 - Mr Sinclair Testifies.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4255 - 49-12-02 - Surprise Witness.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4256 - 49-12-05 - Joseph Tells The Truth.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4433 - 50-00-00 - Cousin Sylvester Tries To Cheat Evie.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4434 - 50-00-00 - Sylvester Has Tricked Willie.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4435 - 50-00-00 - Shuffle Wants To Visit Ma.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4436 - 50-00-00 - Sylvester Has Gotten A Package.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4437 - 50-00-00 - Evil Sylvester Is Out On Parole.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4438 - 50-00-00 - Willie Invests $2,000.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4439 - 50-00-00 - Sylvester Has Bought A New Car.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4440 - 50-00-00 - Sylvester Wants Fayes Inheritance.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4441 - 50-00-00 - Sylvester Turns Into A Wolf.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4442 - 00-00-00 - Gladys Tries To Show Faye Wgat.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4443 - 50-00-00 - Sylvester Is Chewed Out.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4444 - 50-00-00 - Faye Asks Shuffle For Advice.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4445 - 50-00-00 - Shuffle Gets Marietta To Give In.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4446 - 50-00-00 - Cousin Ed Gives Son Pointers.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4447 - 50-00-00 - Evey Feels Pushed Around.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4448 - 50-00-00 - Ma Asks Evey About Investment (aka 4455).ogg
Ma Perkins - 4449 - 50-00-00 - Evey Fed Up With Shuffles Crazy Ideas.ogg
Ma Perkins - 4450 - 50-00-00 - Evey Willie Are Controlled By Sylvester.ogg
Ma Perkins - 4451 - 50-00-00 - Fay Tells Ma Of Sylvesters Proposalaka 1950-08-29.ogg
Ma Perkins - 4452 - 50-00-00 - Ma Asks Evey Willie About Sylvester Investment (aka 50-08-30).ogg
Ma Perkins - 4453 - 50-00-00 - Ma Can't Believe Sylvester Bad (aka 50-08-31).mp3
Ma Perkins - 4454 - 50-00-00 - Not In Love With Cousin Sylvester.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4454 - 50-09-07 - Ma Confronts The Cousins.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4455 - 50-00-00 - Ma Asks Evey Willie Of Investmentaka 4448.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4456 - 50-00-00 - Shuffle Says That Since.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4457 - 00-00-00 -.txt
Ma Perkins - 4463 - 50-00-00 - Shuffle Is Overjoyed.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4464 - 50-00-00 - Ma Finally Confronts.ogg
Ma Perkins - 4467 - 00-00-00 - The Cousins Have Alibied.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4468 - 00-00-00 - Shuffle Is Very Disappointed.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4469 - 00-00-00 - The Family Meets To Decide How To Talk Evie Out Of Mortaging The House.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4470 - 00-00-00 - Sylvester Convinces Evie To Mortgage The House Rather Than Insisting On.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4471 - 50-00-00 - Sylvester Promises To Give Money Back.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4472 - 00-00-00 - Sylvester Decides To Wreck Car.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4475 - 00-00-00 - Ma Recalls To Herself.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4476 - 00-00-00 - Sylvesters Car Has Been.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4485 - 50-10-20 - Ma And Ed Discuss Sylvester.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4487 - 50-00-00 - Ma Suspects Sylvester.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4488 - 50-00-00 - Shuffle Goes To See Evey Willie.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4495 - 00-00-00 - Evey Willie Invited To Cousins House.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4495 - 00-00-00 - Sylvester Has Proposed And Faye Has Turned Him Down.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4496 - 00-00-00 - Shuffle Has Proof That Mr Myers Isn't Connected With The Mine And Things.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4497 - 00-00-00 -  Ma Has Finally Decided To See.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4498 - 00-00-00 - Who Should Come To Town, Of All People, The Real Mitch Myers.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4513 - 00-00-00 - Ma Finally Learns The Truth.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4514 - 00-00-00 - Ma Feels Like A Used Fool.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4514 - 50-00-00 - Ma Feels Like A Used Fool.ogg
Ma Perkins - 4527 - 00-00-00 - Bonita Thanks Ma For Getting The Cousins Out Of Jail.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4528 - 50-00-00 - Faye Decides She Doesnt Want.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4529 - 50-12-21 -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4530 - 50-12-22 -   -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4531 - 50-00-00 - Shuffle Returns To The Lumber.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4532 - 50-00-00 - Spencer Greyson Has Decided To Visit Faye.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4536 - 51-01-01 - Faye And Spencer, Ma And Shuffle, Welcome In The New Year.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4537 - 00-00-00 - Mr Spencer Greyson Has Arrived In Rushville Center.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4537 - 51-01-02 - Spencer Meets An Old War Buddy Of His.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4538 - 51-01-03 - Faye Is Obviously Very Much In Love.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4539 - 50-00-00 - Spencer Called Corny By NY Friends.ogg
Ma Perkins - 4539 - 51-01-04 - The Family Is Gossiping About The New Romance.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4540 - 50-00-00 - Evey Willie Plan New Years Party.ogg
Ma Perkins - 4540 - 51-01-05 - Spencer Has Decided To Stay In Rushville Center For A While Longer.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4541 - 51-01-08 - Faye And Spencer Are Finding Out More About Each Other.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4542 - 51-01-09 - Mysterious Tom Welles Is Still Angry At Spencer.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4543 - 51-01-10 - Spencer Greyson Wants To Talk To Ma.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4545 - 50-00-00 - Evey Willies New Yrs Party (aka 1950-12-25).mp3
Ma Perkins - 4545 - 51-01-12 - Spencer Asks Shuffle To Help Him.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4546 - 51-01-01 - Faye-spence-ma-shuffle At Party.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4546 - 51-01-15 - Spencer Continues To Pitch Woo At Faye.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4547 - 51-01-02 - Spencer Meets Old War Pal.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4547 - 51-01-16 - Tom Has Decided To Marry Kay.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4548 - 51-01-03 - Faye Very Much In Love.ogg
Ma Perkins - 4548 - 51-01-17 - Gladys Pembleton Feels There's More To Spencer Than Meets The Eye.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4549 - 51-01-04 - The Family Is Gossiping.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4549 - 51-01-18 - Spencer Announces That He Must Return To New York.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4550 - 51-01-05 - Spencer Has Decided To Stay.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4550 - 51-01-19 - Spencer Leaves, Promising Someday To Return.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4551 - 51-01-08 - Faye Spencer Attraction.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4551 - 51-01-22 - Spencer Greyson Has Left, And Faye Misses Him.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4552 - 51-01-09 - Mysterious Tom Still A Mystery.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4552 - 51-01-23 - Evie And Faye Talk About Spencer.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4553 - 51-01-10 - Spencer Wants To Talk With Ma.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4553 - 51-01-24 - Faye Is Deeply In Love With Spencer.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4554 - 51-01-11 - Spencers Private Talk With Ma.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4554 - 51-01-25 - Ma And Faye Meet Tom Welles On The Street.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4555 - 51-01-12 - What's Wrong With Spencers Pal.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4555 - 51-01-26 - At Last - Spencer Has Written.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4556 - 51-01-15 - Spencer Continues To Woo Faye.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4556 - 51-01-29 - Fay Reads Her Letter Over And Over.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4557 - 51-01-16 - Tom Decides To Marry Kay.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4557 - 51-01-30 - Tom Welles, The Mysterious 'Surly' So-Called Friend.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4558 - 51-01-17 - Evey Gossips Of Spencer Faye.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4558 - 51-01-31 - Spencer's Present Has Arrived.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4559 - 51-01-18 - Spencer Says He Must Leave.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4559 - 51-02-01 - Spencer Calls Fay.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4560 - 51-01-19 - Spencer Promises To Return.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4560 - 51-02-02 - Fay Decides To Go To New York.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4561 - 51-01-22 - Spencer Gone-Faye Misses Him.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4561 - 51-02-05 - Preparing For Fay's Departure.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4562 - 51-01-23 - Evey Faye Talk About Spencer.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4562 - 51-02-06 - Tom Drops By For One Of Ma's Dinners.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4563 - 51-01-24 - Faye Deeply In Love W Spencer.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4563 - 51-02-07 - Tom And Ma Become Friends.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4564 - 51-01-25 - Ma Faye Meet Tom On Street.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4564 - 51-02-08 - Ma Discusses The Dinner With Tom.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4565 - 51-01-26 - At Last-Spencer Has Written.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4565 - 51-02-09 - Fay's First Letter From New York.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4566 - 51-01-29 - Faye Reads Letter Over Over.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4566 - 51-02-12 - Everyone Is Concerned.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4567 - 51-01-30 - Tom Welles Is Mysterious Friend.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4568 - 51-01-31 - Spencer Greysons Present Arrives.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4569 - 51-02-01 - Big News-spencer Calling Faye.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4569 - 51-02-15 - Tom Has Been Sick.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4570 - 51-02-02 - Faye Decides To Go To New York.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4570 - 51-02-16 - Evey Researchs Tom's Activities.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4571 - 51-02-19 - Fay's Telegram From New York.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4572 - 51-02-06 - Tom Drops By For Mas Dinner.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4572 - 51-02-20 - Willie And Tom's Job.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4573 - 51-02-07 - Tom Ma Become Friends.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4574 - 51-02-08 - Ma Discusses Dinner W Tom.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4575 - 51-02-09 - Evey Willie Ma Discuss Ny Letter.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4576 - 51-02-12 - Everyone Is Concerned.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4577 - 51-02-27 - Fay Is Back From New York.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4578 - 51-02-28 - Ma Goes To Al's Diner.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4579 - 51-02-15 - Tom Welles Has Been Sick.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4579 - 51-03-01 -   -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4580 - 51-02-16 - Evey Checking On Toms Doings.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4580 - 51-03-02 - Fay Breaks Down About New York.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4581 - 51-02-19 - Analizes Fayes Telegram.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4581 - 51-03-05 - Fay Talks About Her Experiences In New York.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4582 - 51-02-20 - Willie Speaks To Al Re Toms Job.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4582 - 51-03-06 - Tom Finds Unexpected Kindness.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4585 - 51-03-09 - Does Fay Want To Marry Greyson.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4586 - 51-03-12 - Fay Appears To Be Forced.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4587 - 51-02-27 - Faye Says Nothing Of Spencer.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4587 - 51-03-13 - Tom And Fay Meet.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4588 - 51-02-28 - Ma Goes To Als Diner.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4588 - 51-03-14 -.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4589 - 51-03-01 - Ma Visits Tom To Talk.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4590 - 51-03-02 - Faye Admits Ny Went Badly.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4591 - 51-03-05 - Faye Tells Ma Of Visit.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4592 - 51-03-06 - Tom Rcvs Unexpected Kindness.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4595 - 51-03-09 - Ma Faye Talk-Marry Grayson.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4596 - 51-03-10 - Is Faye Forced To Meet Tom.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4597 - 51-03-11 - Tom Faye In Toms Room.mp3
Ma Perkins - 4598 - 51-03-12 - Faye Relates Her Experiences.mp3
Ma Perkins - 7064 - 60-11-00 - Next To The Last Show-Thanksgiving.mp3
Ma Perkins - Virginia Payne picture.jpg





Labor ipse voluptas


On Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 8:42:46 AM CDT, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Hi Rick.  I was thinking of any surviving episodes that might deal with the death of Ma's son John.  I do not know if there are any, and have no idea of the date except that we could probably rule out all dates prior to the beginning of the U.S. military involvement in World War II.  The best clue would be an episode title that refers to John.

Thank you for the post.  I hope everything is going well in Dallas.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Richard Davenport"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday October 7 2020 2:55:42AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

It was asked by Larry if any eps of the show Ma Perkins survive....I have 422 shows (not cleaned up and de-duped and names cleaned up,etc)  if the date of the show was known I could check if I have it...

Rick

Labor ipse voluptas


On Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 7:20:50 PM CDT, Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims@...> wrote:


Larry,

Mike from Medford here. I read many of the posts but do not always converse. 

I think the stuff you are working on is fabulous. Historically these types of creative sets would have been snail mail distros in any number of yahoo otr groups. That's where I began collecting or gathering my base collection and perhaps others here can relate.

Jim Beshires had a specific vision for this group which was a yahoo group that expanded to several yahoo groups. At that time he wanted to put together certified complete or certified accurate sets only. That was the work of the researchers.

At any rate, I stepped in about 2001 or 2002. Back then the hubs  were not running yet as far as I remember. My collection grew exponentially from hubs and snail mail distros. The problem was perhaps overall quality. Yes many good but also many bad shows.  

The researchers group stood out and had shall we say stricter idea, a different plan of how sets were going to be distributed.

Now that many have died and shows are readily available from archive etc., this group kinda remains the only standing yahoo group with surviving members of old and now newer people with vigor and pleasant energy.

There has always of course been cobalt club too.

These days any and all are welcome here. This group has morphed a bit.

Anyway, I appreciate the conversation and wirk you are bringing to the table. It's just different from the old way.

Regards, 

mike


On Mon, Oct 5, 2020 at 5:54 PM, Larry Maupin
<lmaupin@...> wrote:
I would like to address and clarify one point that Ryan raises.  I have not referred to the few collections that I have put together this year as curated.  All of them were inspired by my opinion that the source material was not already in the OTRR Library and thus might provide other group members with something new to listen to.  With Ryan's assistance, a couple of them are now on the Internet Archive and all have been made available to all group members through links that Ryan and Peter Nuro have sent out in emails.

What I am working on now is intended to be a curated collection, and if it is accepted by Paul Kornman when I submit it to him will be the first one ever to appear in the library that meets his definition of that term.  If I understand it correctly, each such collection needs to have a specific theme, all the episodes included must fall within the scope of that theme and belong together, and all must be of the best possible sound quality.

These curated collections are not Moderated/Certified sets, but may be attractive to visitors to the library and I think are a legitimate activity for group members to pursue.  Ryan's point about a decrease in the number of certified series sets has concerned me also.  But a member could no doubt curate a set that meets Paul's definition that would be small and yet unique and would not take very long to prepare.  Just last week I was speaking with a dealer, and he mentioned that he liked the idea of having a collection of final episodes of well known OTR series.  I think that is a great idea, although not the best example of a small set unless the curator limited it to series that are important enough to be given at least four or five pages in John Dunning's On the Air or another authoritative reference source.

Perhaps a good example of a smaller curated set would be all episodes in which a significant character in an OTR series enlisted and left home to serve overseas or was killed, seriously injured or reported missing in action during World War II.  The soap operas alone have quite a few examples of this.  In the only surviving episode of Barry Cameron, for example, Barry has just recently returned from overseas.  In an episode of Portia Faces Life aired on June 7, 1944 Portia's husband Walter Manning, who has been missing and presumed dead, appears at a psychiatric clinic in New York City under the name of McDermott and has suffered such severe shell shock that he hardly knows who or where he is.  The best example of this that I can think of is the death of Ma Perkins' son John, who as Dunning describes it (p.421) "was killed in World War II [and] buried somewhere in Germany in an unmarked grave."  Does anyone know if any episodes of Ma Perkins have survived that deal with that tragedy and its aftermath?  If even a few could be found they could be the cornerstone of a small collection built on that theme that would not have to be limited to soap operas.

Sorry for such a long post, but  when I warm to a subject it is difficult to stop.  The themes around which a curated collection can be built seem almost limitless.  For a really small one, what about one which only has episodes dealing with the adultery of a major character?  Both Kit Calvert of Aunt Mary and Meta Bauer of The Guiding Light engage in adulterous relationships while in an unhappy marriage.  Also, in an episode of Road of Life broadcast on November 14, 1947 Dr. Jim Brent's wife Carol has returned home after engaging in passionate kissing with the handsome cad Alec Ransom in her car.  It is not difficult to imagine where this is heading. I think the list of such characters and episodes would be manageably small, and the willingness of programs such as these to address such mature subject matter lends them a complexity that is seldom found in the treatment of marriage in old-time radio programs.



 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Monday October 5 2020 4:19:22PM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] HISTORICAL CRIME CASES AS DRAMATIZED ON RADIO PROGRAMS: Episode Summary #1

I think Scott's message is addressing a couple different issues. Larry has put together a few collections that he's calling curated collections; these are entirely different than our Moderated (formerly Certified) series sets. These are not proofed or coupled with bios, articles, etc. They are just sets of shows that Larry finds interesting that have a thematic connection. He is then posting episode summaries and review for them. They are not released anywhere and only linked for members of this group. 

As far as how Moderated/Certified sets are chosen, it's entirely up to the individuals doing sets. I tend to look for series that have not been released by OTRR (Life with Luigi, Tales of the Texas Rangers, etc). However, we also get offered very nice series sets that members and non-members have been working on independently that have previously been released (Broadway's My Beat, Philip Marlowe, etc.) So I think our releases tend to get a nice mix of new series and previously released series. We literally have maybe three people heading up series projects so they choose whatever's of interest to them; after all, you could be working with this series a looooong time.

Personally, I tend to look for shorter series because that lets me get a series out every month or so. A show like Gildersleeve (my favorite, by the way) could easily take a year or two (and that's with a group of steady volunteers helping) and I feel that for the group to have any momentum we need to have new sets appearing more frequently than that. Participation has already waned considerably over the years; I think if we only put out 2 or 3 sets per year interest would wane even further.

All this being said, anyone is welcome to begin putting a series together; I'm glad to offer direction and others here have supervised many sets over the years.

Hopefully I'm addressing your concerns, Scott, and didn't totally misread your post.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Monday, October 5, 2020, 09:39:23 AM CDT, mcoates via groups.io <mcoates_bills@...> wrote:


I'm not judging anyone here, because everyone involved in doing the work, busts their but to see that the purchasing group has a nice finished product, and I appreciate that It seems, though, that in the last year or so, the projects have become to collect the more obscure broadcasts; rare episodes over well known programs. However, there have been times when someone was cleaning their hard drive more than once, and we got "Dragnet," and many other popular shows. However, rare episodes are getting most of the attention, where well-known episodes are put on the back burner. For instance, "The Great Gildersleeve," has not been updated for many years, and the bit rate in 32 kbps. There are many episodes in the library that still suffer the carnage of a low bit rate. When I listen to them, and then listen to my own copies at 192 kbps, wow, what a difference. I think we should start focusing on programs we already have, but at a low bit rate, to get that bit rate up to 128 kbps. Regards, Mike.

On 10/2/20 7:58 AM, Scott Galley via groups.io wrote:
The "Unwritten Law" is a show I'm not familiar with, Larry, although I collect a lot of contemporary British programming. I'm glad that you're taking this path, as the curated set of 'historical cases' seems (in my mind, anyway) to have been covered by companies such as 'Radio Spirits'. If your going to take on such a project, then it's great to read of shows that people may not be familiar with. Contemporary British radio (1967 on, I think, when the BBC changed over from "The Light Programme" to "BBC Radio 2") is a treasure trove of dramatic radio, comedy and the such, so this is a welcome addition.

If we're talking about a curated collection of American Golden Age radio, then why not something obscure, like the "Thespian, or the Ham Actor". Always a favourite character of mine, this stereotypical fellow crops up in Westerns, Crime Shows, Comedies... sometimes for comedic effect, sometimes for real pathos. Just a thought.

Scott

--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin