Topics

I love a Mystery Update


Jim Jones
 

I love a Mystery was one of the most popular adventure radio shows in radio history. The show ran from 1934 to 1944. There were a total of 52 different series. The show went into syndication and repeated most episodes from 1949 to 1952. Total number of series including repeats and recreations equal 98.

Our OTRR library contains program files from both the original and the syndication series. However, the filesare  not standardized. The files have been compiled from different sources, and contain a variety of formats. Hence, they do not alphabetize and are in a random order. It is not user-friendly to download.

I have organized the ILAM series into FOLDERS by show title. Also, I have standardized the program titles for ALL ILAM episodes. The following is how I suggest we organize the ILAM program. The first number is the show number. The date is the date of the first episode of that series. The numbers following the title tell how many shows in that series. Those with no trailing numbers are complete series. Single episode I put in a separate folder called 100 Singles.

01. (39.01.16) Roxy City Mob (02 of 14)

13. (39.10.23) Fear That Creeps Like a Cat (5 of 20)

14. (39.11.20) The Thing That Cried in the Night (15 of 15)

15. (39.12.11) Bury Your Dead in Arizona (15 of 15)

19. (40.03.11) Murder in Turquoise Pass (2 of 15)

20. (40.04.01) The Snake with the Diamond Eyes (3 of 26)

21. (40.09.30) The Tropics Don't Call It Murder (3 of 26)

24. (41.05.12) Eight Kinds Of Murder (2 of 16)

25. (41.10.06) Monster in the Mansion (2 of 16)

26. (41.12.01) Secret Passage to Death (4 of 20)

28. (42.04.13) Pirate Loot of the Island of Skulls (10 of 26)

37. (43.11.08) Hermit of San Felipe Atabapo (18 of 20)

50. (44.10.10) Monster in the Mansion (2 of 16)

53. (49.10.03) Fear That Creeps Like A Cat [recreation] (20 of 20)

54. (49.10.03) Thing That Cried In The Night (15 of 15)

56. (49.12.12) Million Dollar Curse (need Ep10)

57. (50.01.02) Temple of Vampires (20 of 20)

58. (50.01.30) Battle Of The Century (14 of 18)

59. (50.02.23) Tropics Don't Call It Murder (2 of 26)

60. (50.03.31) TCOT Nevada Man Killer (2of25)

63. (50.06.23) The Snake with the Diamond Eyes (2 of 26)

65. (50.08.21) Murder in Turquoise Pass (3 of 15)

84. (51.11.19) The Killer of the Circle M (4 of 20)

85. (51.12.17) Murder Is the Word for It (5 of 15)

87. (52.02.18) The Graves of Whamperjaw, Texas (4 of 15)

90. (52.05.19) Hermit of San Felipe Atabapo (20 of 20)

96. (52.10.28) I am the Destroyer of Women (2 of 15)

97. (52.11.20) Bride of the Werewolf (2 of 15)

100. Single Episodes

Because of the long list, I have attached the word doc. which BOTH the folder names and the file names. 
I would like to see the OTRR library adopt a similar system or some type of organization for this program

jj


Gordon Johansen
 

I just have to say that your list is a thing of beauty for fans of ILAM Jim. I had put a few hours into doing the same thing a couple of years ago but after a computer issue that lost a couple hours of my work and the backup, I gave up as I just didn't have more time that day.

It is interesting to see that we almost did the same structure. I used dashes instead of dots in the dates and did not folderize the series as I didn't know the numbers for them. I like the way you did it better.

Gord

Jim Jones wrote on 3/22/21 1:48 PM:

I love a Mystery was one of the most popular adventure radio shows in radio history. The show ran from 1934 to 1944. There were a total of 52 different series. The show went into syndication and repeated most episodes from 1949 to 1952. Total number of series including repeats and recreations equal 98.

Our OTRR library contains program files from both the original and the syndication series. However, the filesare  not standardized. The files have been compiled from different sources, and contain a variety of formats. Hence, they do not alphabetize and are in a random order. It is not user-friendly to download.

I have organized the ILAM series into FOLDERS by show title. Also, I have standardized the program titles for ALL ILAM episodes. The following is how I suggest we organize the ILAM program. The first number is the show number. The date is the date of the first episode of that series. The numbers following the title tell how many shows in that series. Those with no trailing numbers are complete series. Single episode I put in a separate folder called 100 Singles.

01. (39.01.16) Roxy City Mob (02 of 14)

13. (39.10.23) Fear That Creeps Like a Cat (5 of 20)

14. (39.11.20) The Thing That Cried in the Night (15 of 15)

15. (39.12.11) Bury Your Dead in Arizona (15 of 15)

19. (40.03.11) Murder in Turquoise Pass (2 of 15)

20. (40.04.01) The Snake with the Diamond Eyes (3 of 26)

21. (40.09.30) The Tropics Don't Call It Murder (3 of 26)

24. (41.05.12) Eight Kinds Of Murder (2 of 16)

25. (41.10.06) Monster in the Mansion (2 of 16)

26. (41.12.01) Secret Passage to Death (4 of 20)

28. (42.04.13) Pirate Loot of the Island of Skulls (10 of 26)

37. (43.11.08) Hermit of San Felipe Atabapo (18 of 20)

50. (44.10.10) Monster in the Mansion (2 of 16)

53. (49.10.03) Fear That Creeps Like A Cat [recreation] (20 of 20)

54. (49.10.03) Thing That Cried In The Night (15 of 15)

56. (49.12.12) Million Dollar Curse (need Ep10)

57. (50.01.02) Temple of Vampires (20 of 20)

58. (50.01.30) Battle Of The Century (14 of 18)

59. (50.02.23) Tropics Don't Call It Murder (2 of 26)

60. (50.03.31) TCOT Nevada Man Killer (2of25)

63. (50.06.23) The Snake with the Diamond Eyes (2 of 26)

65. (50.08.21) Murder in Turquoise Pass (3 of 15)

84. (51.11.19) The Killer of the Circle M (4 of 20)

85. (51.12.17) Murder Is the Word for It (5 of 15)

87. (52.02.18) The Graves of Whamperjaw, Texas (4 of 15)

90. (52.05.19) Hermit of San Felipe Atabapo (20 of 20)

96. (52.10.28) I am the Destroyer of Women (2 of 15)

97. (52.11.20) Bride of the Werewolf (2 of 15)

100. Single Episodes

Because of the long list, I have attached the word doc. which BOTH the folder names and the file names. 
I would like to see the OTRR library adopt a similar system or some type of organization for this program

jj


--
Sent from Postbox


Jim Jones
 

Gordon
Thanks for the reply. I like this structure also. HOWEVER, I am researching ILAM for Paul in an effort to update the OTRR Library. What I am finding is that there are VERY FEW original shows from 1939 to 1944 (from Hollywood). There are a few, but most are mislabeled rebroadcasts from the later (>1949) New York series. When we finally weed out these repeats we may loose about 1/3 to 1/2 of the shows. The early part of the collection may look a lot different when I am finished. Right now I am about 1/2 way through listening to the series and compiling data on a  spreadsheet. I will share this info when I am through.

I do have 3 ILAM movies which I will ,also share next week to spark a little interest in the series.

jj


Joe Webb
 

There are many reels in the Kelez-Falk collection that OTRR bought that are close to source as traded in the late 60s and 70s. We are seeking more volunteers to do the reels transfers of the collection, and I have been holding the Morse material aside (except One Man's Family for which we do have a volunteer). Please let me, Ryan E, or David O of your interest and capabilities. Some of the reels originated with Jim Harmon ("Great Radio Heroes") who did some of the early transfers.

--


Gordon Johansen
 

I'd love to volunteer for the Morse material but I have no capability to do this. If help is needed in comparing copies, editing notes, etc. for these, I am happy to that. I have both the normally available versions and some of the higher quality versions to compare to.

Gord

Joe Webb via groups.io wrote on 3/27/21 4:45 AM:

There are many reels in the Kelez-Falk collection that OTRR bought that are close to source as traded in the late 60s and 70s. We are seeking more volunteers to do the reels transfers of the collection, and I have been holding the Morse material aside (except One Man's Family for which we do have a volunteer). Please let me, Ryan E, or David O of your interest and capabilities. Some of the reels originated with Jim Harmon ("Great Radio Heroes") who did some of the early transfers.

--

--
Sent from Postbox


Jim Jones
 

Joe
I would love to be able to transcribe tapes, but do not have the equipment. 

Here are some interesting excerpts from a Jim Harmon interview about Morse and the lost episodes.

Harmon knew and worked with Morse. Here is how he described the very eccentric and recluse Morse: "He was impressive, intelligent. To me, he tried being friendly as possible. But he was somewhat aloof, "different" like a lot of creative people. He believed he was only an instrument to receive the great creative force of the universe. Why didn't he receive plays as great as Shakespeare? Because, he said, he was an imperfect instrument, only good enough to receive radio plays.

When asked about the lost episodes and where they might be, Harmon replied: A: Just lost. If recorded, they were discarded. Many were probably never recorded -- they just went out live.

He was also asked: Very few ILAM recordings exist today; what part did you play with this, if any, with those few shows that currently circulate?
Harmon Answer: I was the first old time radio fan to contact Morse in 1960. At the time, Almost no one was collecting old radio shows. I was a fellow writer, although not for radio. Morse treated me like a colleague. I borrowed the approx. 65 transcriptions of the New York series and a few fragments of the old series (mostly Island of Skulls), and 52 half-hours of ADV. BY MORSE. I copied them to tape, as best I could (I knew nothing about recording at the time) and returned them. Dave Amaral, a professional radio engineer, borrowed the same discs plus the I LOVE ADVENTURE discs we couldn't find at the time in Morse's garage. Dave, later a good friend, did a better transfer to tape. Many of my original tapes are still circulating. I can recognize little things that I know mean they were from my originals -- especially the ADV. BY M. My forty year old masters still play -- with some loss of highs and volume.

From 1939 to 1944 the show was produced in Hollywood. These are the originals which are in high demand. From 1949 to 1952 the show moved to NY. It appears these are the shows Harmon saved. The NY shows were rebroadcasts from original scripts. This is where most of the existing shows come from. From 1940 to 1942 the show went from 15 min/5 days a week to 30 min/2 times a week.  I have found a few complete shows here, but most are only 1/2 an episode (either first half or second half). 

Harmon also produced the 1996 reproduction "The Fear that Creeps Like a Cat".

Footnote: I have always found it fascinating that Morse wrote both the wild and creepy ILAM as well as the daytime soap "One Man's Family". He was quite a talent.

Still listening to and sorting shows from the OTRR library. Should have a detailed spreadsheet of existing shows by next week.

jj


Richard Davenport
 

I finished the redo of my ILAM folder.
 They are now sub foldered for every single sub plot title, the order and year each happened, the duration dates and my current holdings.  See below attachment.

Rick



Labor ipse voluptas


On Saturday, March 27, 2021, 10:05:05 AM CDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:


Joe
I would love to be able to transcribe tapes, but do not have the equipment. 

Here are some interesting excerpts from a Jim Harmon interview about Morse and the lost episodes.

Harmon knew and worked with Morse. Here is how he described the very eccentric and recluse Morse: "He was impressive, intelligent. To me, he tried being friendly as possible. But he was somewhat aloof, "different" like a lot of creative people. He believed he was only an instrument to receive the great creative force of the universe. Why didn't he receive plays as great as Shakespeare? Because, he said, he was an imperfect instrument, only good enough to receive radio plays.

When asked about the lost episodes and where they might be, Harmon replied: A: Just lost. If recorded, they were discarded. Many were probably never recorded -- they just went out live.

He was also asked: Very few ILAM recordings exist today; what part did you play with this, if any, with those few shows that currently circulate?
Harmon Answer: I was the first old time radio fan to contact Morse in 1960. At the time, Almost no one was collecting old radio shows. I was a fellow writer, although not for radio. Morse treated me like a colleague. I borrowed the approx. 65 transcriptions of the New York series and a few fragments of the old series (mostly Island of Skulls), and 52 half-hours of ADV. BY MORSE. I copied them to tape, as best I could (I knew nothing about recording at the time) and returned them. Dave Amaral, a professional radio engineer, borrowed the same discs plus the I LOVE ADVENTURE discs we couldn't find at the time in Morse's garage. Dave, later a good friend, did a better transfer to tape. Many of my original tapes are still circulating. I can recognize little things that I know mean they were from my originals -- especially the ADV. BY M. My forty year old masters still play -- with some loss of highs and volume.

From 1939 to 1944 the show was produced in Hollywood. These are the originals which are in high demand. From 1949 to 1952 the show moved to NY. It appears these are the shows Harmon saved. The NY shows were rebroadcasts from original scripts. This is where most of the existing shows come from. From 1940 to 1942 the show went from 15 min/5 days a week to 30 min/2 times a week.  I have found a few complete shows here, but most are only 1/2 an episode (either first half or second half). 

Harmon also produced the 1996 reproduction "The Fear that Creeps Like a Cat".

Footnote: I have always found it fascinating that Morse wrote both the wild and creepy ILAM as well as the daytime soap "One Man's Family". He was quite a talent.

Still listening to and sorting shows from the OTRR library. Should have a detailed spreadsheet of existing shows by next week.

jj


Jim Jones
 

Richard
I am glad to see you have some shows that I don’t have and that the OTRR library does not have. I am eager to compile them into a master group. After I complete the listening and organizing of the library shows we can start to compile accurate files for the different shows.
 
Just glancing I know many of your shows (like everyone else) are incorrectly labeled. Examples: Your Tropics Don’t Call It Murder Part 1 is probably a mutual broadcast. The mutual broadcasts did not start until 1949. Your 15 and 17 are probably repeats. The Snake with the Diamond Eyes 40—6-13 is a repeat of #11. It goes on and on. Almost every series has mislabeled shows.
 
Will stay in touch. I will share my master spreadsheet for ILAM and we can start compiling from there.
 
jj
 
 

From: Richard Davenport
Sent: Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:39 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] I love a Mystery Update
 
I finished the redo of my ILAM folder.
They are now sub foldered for every single sub plot title, the order and year each happened, the duration dates and my current holdings.  See below attachment.
 
Rick
 
 
 
Labor ipse voluptas
 
 
On Saturday, March 27, 2021, 10:05:05 AM CDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:
 
 
Joe
I would love to be able to transcribe tapes, but do not have the equipment.

Here are some interesting excerpts from a Jim Harmon interview about Morse and the lost episodes.

Harmon knew and worked with Morse. Here is how he described the very eccentric and recluse Morse: "He was impressive, intelligent. To me, he tried being friendly as possible. But he was somewhat aloof, "different" like a lot of creative people. He believed he was only an instrument to receive the great creative force of the universe. Why didn't he receive plays as great as Shakespeare? Because, he said, he was an imperfect instrument, only good enough to receive radio plays.

When asked about the lost episodes and where they might be, Harmon replied: A: Just lost. If recorded, they were discarded. Many were probably never recorded -- they just went out live.

He was also asked: Very few ILAM recordings exist today; what part did you play with this, if any, with those few shows that currently circulate?
Harmon Answer: I was the first old time radio fan to contact Morse in 1960. At the time, Almost no one was collecting old radio shows. I was a fellow writer, although not for radio. Morse treated me like a colleague. I borrowed the approx. 65 transcriptions of the New York series and a few fragments of the old series (mostly Island of Skulls), and 52 half-hours of ADV. BY MORSE. I copied them to tape, as best I could (I knew nothing about recording at the time) and returned them. Dave Amaral, a professional radio engineer, borrowed the same discs plus the I LOVE ADVENTURE discs we couldn't find at the time in Morse's garage. Dave, later a good friend, did a better transfer to tape. Many of my original tapes are still circulating. I can recognize little things that I know mean they were from my originals -- especially the ADV. BY M. My forty year old masters still play -- with some loss of highs and volume.

From 1939 to 1944 the show was produced in Hollywood. These are the originals which are in high demand. From 1949 to 1952 the show moved to NY. It appears these are the shows Harmon saved. The NY shows were rebroadcasts from original scripts. This is where most of the existing shows come from. From 1940 to 1942 the show went from 15 min/5 days a week to 30 min/2 times a week.  I have found a few complete shows here, but most are only 1/2 an episode (either first half or second half).

Harmon also produced the 1996 reproduction "The Fear that Creeps Like a Cat".

Footnote: I have always found it fascinating that Morse wrote both the wild and creepy ILAM as well as the daytime soap "One Man's Family". He was quite a talent.

Still listening to and sorting shows from the OTRR library. Should have a detailed spreadsheet of existing shows by next week.

jj


Richard Davenport
 

Those mislabeled are the bane of my existence.  Are there any on your end I don’t have?  I’m just surprised that being that these were from the late 40s and early 50s that so many are missing.

Rick


On Mar 28, 2021, at 10:07 AM, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:


Richard
I am glad to see you have some shows that I don’t have and that the OTRR library does not have. I am eager to compile them into a master group. After I complete the listening and organizing of the library shows we can start to compile accurate files for the different shows.
 
Just glancing I know many of your shows (like everyone else) are incorrectly labeled. Examples: Your Tropics Don’t Call It Murder Part 1 is probably a mutual broadcast. The mutual broadcasts did not start until 1949. Your 15 and 17 are probably repeats. The Snake with the Diamond Eyes 40—6-13 is a repeat of #11. It goes on and on. Almost every series has mislabeled shows.
 
Will stay in touch. I will share my master spreadsheet for ILAM and we can start compiling from there.
 
jj
 
 
From: Richard Davenport
Sent: Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:39 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] I love a Mystery Update
 
I finished the redo of my ILAM folder.
They are now sub foldered for every single sub plot title, the order and year each happened, the duration dates and my current holdings.  See below attachment.
 
Rick
 
 
 
Labor ipse voluptas
 
 
On Saturday, March 27, 2021, 10:05:05 AM CDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:
 
 
Joe
I would love to be able to transcribe tapes, but do not have the equipment.

Here are some interesting excerpts from a Jim Harmon interview about Morse and the lost episodes.

Harmon knew and worked with Morse. Here is how he described the very eccentric and recluse Morse: "He was impressive, intelligent. To me, he tried being friendly as possible. But he was somewhat aloof, "different" like a lot of creative people. He believed he was only an instrument to receive the great creative force of the universe. Why didn't he receive plays as great as Shakespeare? Because, he said, he was an imperfect instrument, only good enough to receive radio plays.

When asked about the lost episodes and where they might be, Harmon replied: A: Just lost. If recorded, they were discarded. Many were probably never recorded -- they just went out live.

He was also asked: Very few ILAM recordings exist today; what part did you play with this, if any, with those few shows that currently circulate?
Harmon Answer: I was the first old time radio fan to contact Morse in 1960. At the time, Almost no one was collecting old radio shows. I was a fellow writer, although not for radio. Morse treated me like a colleague. I borrowed the approx. 65 transcriptions of the New York series and a few fragments of the old series (mostly Island of Skulls), and 52 half-hours of ADV. BY MORSE. I copied them to tape, as best I could (I knew nothing about recording at the time) and returned them. Dave Amaral, a professional radio engineer, borrowed the same discs plus the I LOVE ADVENTURE discs we couldn't find at the time in Morse's garage. Dave, later a good friend, did a better transfer to tape. Many of my original tapes are still circulating. I can recognize little things that I know mean they were from my originals -- especially the ADV. BY M. My forty year old masters still play -- with some loss of highs and volume.

From 1939 to 1944 the show was produced in Hollywood. These are the originals which are in high demand. From 1949 to 1952 the show moved to NY. It appears these are the shows Harmon saved. The NY shows were rebroadcasts from original scripts. This is where most of the existing shows come from. From 1940 to 1942 the show went from 15 min/5 days a week to 30 min/2 times a week.  I have found a few complete shows here, but most are only 1/2 an episode (either first half or second half).

Harmon also produced the 1996 reproduction "The Fear that Creeps Like a Cat".

Footnote: I have always found it fascinating that Morse wrote both the wild and creepy ILAM as well as the daytime soap "One Man's Family". He was quite a talent.

Still listening to and sorting shows from the OTRR library. Should have a detailed spreadsheet of existing shows by next week.

jj


Gordon Johansen
 

Jim/Richard,

I think I may have a few different ones as well but some in higher quality too. I'm happy to pass them on if so. Would it be useful with a list like this to also list the file size so we could get a better indication of potential quality?

I'll try to compare to both your lists this week to check but I'm pretty swamped with work right now so I many not be able to get to it.

Gord

Jim Jones wrote on 3/28/21 9:07 AM:

Richard
I am glad to see you have some shows that I don’t have and that the OTRR library does not have. I am eager to compile them into a master group. After I complete the listening and organizing of the library shows we can start to compile accurate files for the different shows.
 
Just glancing I know many of your shows (like everyone else) are incorrectly labeled. Examples: Your Tropics Don’t Call It Murder Part 1 is probably a mutual broadcast. The mutual broadcasts did not start until 1949. Your 15 and 17 are probably repeats. The Snake with the Diamond Eyes 40—6-13 is a repeat of #11. It goes on and on. Almost every series has mislabeled shows.
 
Will stay in touch. I will share my master spreadsheet for ILAM and we can start compiling from there.
 
jj
 
 
From: Richard Davenport
Sent: Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:39 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] I love a Mystery Update
 
I finished the redo of my ILAM folder.
They are now sub foldered for every single sub plot title, the order and year each happened, the duration dates and my current holdings.  See below attachment.
 
Rick
 
 
 
Labor ipse voluptas
 
 
On Saturday, March 27, 2021, 10:05:05 AM CDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:
 
 
Joe
I would love to be able to transcribe tapes, but do not have the equipment.

Here are some interesting excerpts from a Jim Harmon interview about Morse and the lost episodes.

Harmon knew and worked with Morse. Here is how he described the very eccentric and recluse Morse: "He was impressive, intelligent. To me, he tried being friendly as possible. But he was somewhat aloof, "different" like a lot of creative people. He believed he was only an instrument to receive the great creative force of the universe. Why didn't he receive plays as great as Shakespeare? Because, he said, he was an imperfect instrument, only good enough to receive radio plays.

When asked about the lost episodes and where they might be, Harmon replied: A: Just lost. If recorded, they were discarded. Many were probably never recorded -- they just went out live.

He was also asked: Very few ILAM recordings exist today; what part did you play with this, if any, with those few shows that currently circulate?
Harmon Answer: I was the first old time radio fan to contact Morse in 1960. At the time, Almost no one was collecting old radio shows. I was a fellow writer, although not for radio. Morse treated me like a colleague. I borrowed the approx. 65 transcriptions of the New York series and a few fragments of the old series (mostly Island of Skulls), and 52 half-hours of ADV. BY MORSE. I copied them to tape, as best I could (I knew nothing about recording at the time) and returned them. Dave Amaral, a professional radio engineer, borrowed the same discs plus the I LOVE ADVENTURE discs we couldn't find at the time in Morse's garage. Dave, later a good friend, did a better transfer to tape. Many of my original tapes are still circulating. I can recognize little things that I know mean they were from my originals -- especially the ADV. BY M. My forty year old masters still play -- with some loss of highs and volume.

From 1939 to 1944 the show was produced in Hollywood. These are the originals which are in high demand. From 1949 to 1952 the show moved to NY. It appears these are the shows Harmon saved. The NY shows were rebroadcasts from original scripts. This is where most of the existing shows come from. From 1940 to 1942 the show went from 15 min/5 days a week to 30 min/2 times a week.  I have found a few complete shows here, but most are only 1/2 an episode (either first half or second half).

Harmon also produced the 1996 reproduction "The Fear that Creeps Like a Cat".

Footnote: I have always found it fascinating that Morse wrote both the wild and creepy ILAM as well as the daytime soap "One Man's Family". He was quite a talent.

Still listening to and sorting shows from the OTRR library. Should have a detailed spreadsheet of existing shows by next week.

jj

--
Sent from Postbox


Richard Davenport
 

I can upload my files to you if need be so you can compare your files quality to mine for potential upgrades. I can send a center space link or someplace like that if need be. Getting all the files compared to each other’s collections and sorting out the best ones and getting the names accurate is the only way they will become the best collection it can possibly be.


On Mar 28, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Gordon Johansen <gordonjohansen@...> wrote:

 Jim/Richard,

I think I may have a few different ones as well but some in higher quality too. I'm happy to pass them on if so. Would it be useful with a list like this to also list the file size so we could get a better indication of potential quality?

I'll try to compare to both your lists this week to check but I'm pretty swamped with work right now so I many not be able to get to it.

Gord

Jim Jones wrote on 3/28/21 9:07 AM:
Richard
I am glad to see you have some shows that I don’t have and that the OTRR library does not have. I am eager to compile them into a master group. After I complete the listening and organizing of the library shows we can start to compile accurate files for the different shows.
 
Just glancing I know many of your shows (like everyone else) are incorrectly labeled. Examples: Your Tropics Don’t Call It Murder Part 1 is probably a mutual broadcast. The mutual broadcasts did not start until 1949. Your 15 and 17 are probably repeats. The Snake with the Diamond Eyes 40—6-13 is a repeat of #11. It goes on and on. Almost every series has mislabeled shows.
 
Will stay in touch. I will share my master spreadsheet for ILAM and we can start compiling from there.
 
jj
 
 
From: Richard Davenport
Sent: Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:39 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] I love a Mystery Update
 
I finished the redo of my ILAM folder.
They are now sub foldered for every single sub plot title, the order and year each happened, the duration dates and my current holdings.  See below attachment.
 
Rick
 
 
 
Labor ipse voluptas
 
 
On Saturday, March 27, 2021, 10:05:05 AM CDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:
 
 
Joe
I would love to be able to transcribe tapes, but do not have the equipment.

Here are some interesting excerpts from a Jim Harmon interview about Morse and the lost episodes.

Harmon knew and worked with Morse. Here is how he described the very eccentric and recluse Morse: "He was impressive, intelligent. To me, he tried being friendly as possible. But he was somewhat aloof, "different" like a lot of creative people. He believed he was only an instrument to receive the great creative force of the universe. Why didn't he receive plays as great as Shakespeare? Because, he said, he was an imperfect instrument, only good enough to receive radio plays.

When asked about the lost episodes and where they might be, Harmon replied: A: Just lost. If recorded, they were discarded. Many were probably never recorded -- they just went out live.

He was also asked: Very few ILAM recordings exist today; what part did you play with this, if any, with those few shows that currently circulate?
Harmon Answer: I was the first old time radio fan to contact Morse in 1960. At the time, Almost no one was collecting old radio shows. I was a fellow writer, although not for radio. Morse treated me like a colleague. I borrowed the approx. 65 transcriptions of the New York series and a few fragments of the old series (mostly Island of Skulls), and 52 half-hours of ADV. BY MORSE. I copied them to tape, as best I could (I knew nothing about recording at the time) and returned them. Dave Amaral, a professional radio engineer, borrowed the same discs plus the I LOVE ADVENTURE discs we couldn't find at the time in Morse's garage. Dave, later a good friend, did a better transfer to tape. Many of my original tapes are still circulating. I can recognize little things that I know mean they were from my originals -- especially the ADV. BY M. My forty year old masters still play -- with some loss of highs and volume.

From 1939 to 1944 the show was produced in Hollywood. These are the originals which are in high demand. From 1949 to 1952 the show moved to NY. It appears these are the shows Harmon saved. The NY shows were rebroadcasts from original scripts. This is where most of the existing shows come from. From 1940 to 1942 the show went from 15 min/5 days a week to 30 min/2 times a week.  I have found a few complete shows here, but most are only 1/2 an episode (either first half or second half).

Harmon also produced the 1996 reproduction "The Fear that Creeps Like a Cat".

Footnote: I have always found it fascinating that Morse wrote both the wild and creepy ILAM as well as the daytime soap "One Man's Family". He was quite a talent.

Still listening to and sorting shows from the OTRR library. Should have a detailed spreadsheet of existing shows by next week.

jj

--
Sent from Postbox


Gordon Johansen
 

Rick,

If you send a link to gordonjohansen@..., I will download and compare them. I know that I have some that are better quality than in the library.

Gord

Richard Davenport wrote on 3/28/21 1:57 PM:

I can upload my files to you if need be so you can compare your files quality to mine for potential upgrades. I can send a center space link or someplace like that if need be. Getting all the files compared to each other’s collections and sorting out the best ones and getting the names accurate is the only way they will become the best collection it can possibly be.


On Mar 28, 2021, at 2:47 PM, Gordon Johansen <gordonjohansen@...> wrote:

 Jim/Richard,

I think I may have a few different ones as well but some in higher quality too. I'm happy to pass them on if so. Would it be useful with a list like this to also list the file size so we could get a better indication of potential quality?

I'll try to compare to both your lists this week to check but I'm pretty swamped with work right now so I many not be able to get to it.

Gord

Jim Jones wrote on 3/28/21 9:07 AM:
Richard
I am glad to see you have some shows that I don’t have and that the OTRR library does not have. I am eager to compile them into a master group. After I complete the listening and organizing of the library shows we can start to compile accurate files for the different shows.
 
Just glancing I know many of your shows (like everyone else) are incorrectly labeled. Examples: Your Tropics Don’t Call It Murder Part 1 is probably a mutual broadcast. The mutual broadcasts did not start until 1949. Your 15 and 17 are probably repeats. The Snake with the Diamond Eyes 40—6-13 is a repeat of #11. It goes on and on. Almost every series has mislabeled shows.
 
Will stay in touch. I will share my master spreadsheet for ILAM and we can start compiling from there.
 
jj
 
 
From: Richard Davenport
Sent: Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:39 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] I love a Mystery Update
 
I finished the redo of my ILAM folder.
They are now sub foldered for every single sub plot title, the order and year each happened, the duration dates and my current holdings.  See below attachment.
 
Rick
 
 
 
Labor ipse voluptas
 
 
On Saturday, March 27, 2021, 10:05:05 AM CDT, Jim Jones <otr@...> wrote:
 
 
Joe
I would love to be able to transcribe tapes, but do not have the equipment.

Here are some interesting excerpts from a Jim Harmon interview about Morse and the lost episodes.

Harmon knew and worked with Morse. Here is how he described the very eccentric and recluse Morse: "He was impressive, intelligent. To me, he tried being friendly as possible. But he was somewhat aloof, "different" like a lot of creative people. He believed he was only an instrument to receive the great creative force of the universe. Why didn't he receive plays as great as Shakespeare? Because, he said, he was an imperfect instrument, only good enough to receive radio plays.

When asked about the lost episodes and where they might be, Harmon replied: A: Just lost. If recorded, they were discarded. Many were probably never recorded -- they just went out live.

He was also asked: Very few ILAM recordings exist today; what part did you play with this, if any, with those few shows that currently circulate?
Harmon Answer: I was the first old time radio fan to contact Morse in 1960. At the time, Almost no one was collecting old radio shows. I was a fellow writer, although not for radio. Morse treated me like a colleague. I borrowed the approx. 65 transcriptions of the New York series and a few fragments of the old series (mostly Island of Skulls), and 52 half-hours of ADV. BY MORSE. I copied them to tape, as best I could (I knew nothing about recording at the time) and returned them. Dave Amaral, a professional radio engineer, borrowed the same discs plus the I LOVE ADVENTURE discs we couldn't find at the time in Morse's garage. Dave, later a good friend, did a better transfer to tape. Many of my original tapes are still circulating. I can recognize little things that I know mean they were from my originals -- especially the ADV. BY M. My forty year old masters still play -- with some loss of highs and volume.

From 1939 to 1944 the show was produced in Hollywood. These are the originals which are in high demand. From 1949 to 1952 the show moved to NY. It appears these are the shows Harmon saved. The NY shows were rebroadcasts from original scripts. This is where most of the existing shows come from. From 1940 to 1942 the show went from 15 min/5 days a week to 30 min/2 times a week.  I have found a few complete shows here, but most are only 1/2 an episode (either first half or second half).

Harmon also produced the 1996 reproduction "The Fear that Creeps Like a Cat".

Footnote: I have always found it fascinating that Morse wrote both the wild and creepy ILAM as well as the daytime soap "One Man's Family". He was quite a talent.

Still listening to and sorting shows from the OTRR library. Should have a detailed spreadsheet of existing shows by next week.

jj

--
Sent from Postbox

--
Sent from Postbox


Jim Jones
 

Gordon
 
Let me finish hashing out the OTRR Library. I will publish a spreadsheet with all the errors I have found. Also, I have some keys on identifying which batch of shows a series is from. I am still listening to shows, finding mislabels, and dupes.The list I have has length, kbs, and file size.  Once I finish that the whole series I am going to start compiling episodes by titles. I should have the list done later this week.
 
jj
 

From: Gordon Johansen
Sent: Sunday, March 28, 2021 1:47 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] I love a Mystery Update
 
Jim/Richard,

I think I may have a few different ones as well but some in higher quality too. I'm happy to pass them on if so. Would it be useful with a list like this to also list the file size so we could get a better indication of potential quality?

I'll try to compare to both your lists this week to check but I'm pretty swamped with work right now so I many not be able to get to it.

Gord

Jim Jones wrote on 3/28/21 9:07 AM:
Richard
I am glad to see you have some shows that I don’t have and that the OTRR library does not have. I am eager to compile them into a master group. After I complete the listening and organizing of the library shows we can start to compile accurate files for the different shows.
 
Just glancing I know many of your shows (like everyone else) are incorrectly labeled. Examples: Your Tropics Don’t Call It Murder Part 1 is probably a mutual broadcast. The mutual broadcasts did not start until 1949. Your 15 and 17 are probably repeats. The Snake with the Diamond Eyes 40—6-13 is a repeat of #11. It goes on and on. Almost every series has mislabeled shows.
 
Will stay in touch. I will share my master spreadsheet for ILAM and we can start compiling from there.
 
jj
 
 
From: Richard Davenport
Sent: Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:39 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] I love a Mystery Update
 
I finished the redo of my ILAM folder.
They are now sub foldered for every single sub plot title, the order and year each happened, the duration dates and my current holdings.  See below attachment.
 
Rick
 
 
 
Labor ipse voluptas
 
 
On Saturday, March 27, 2021, 10:05:05 AM CDT, Jim Jones mailto:otr@... wrote:
 
 
Joe
I would love to be able to transcribe tapes, but do not have the equipment.

Here are some interesting excerpts from a Jim Harmon interview about Morse and the lost episodes.

Harmon knew and worked with Morse. Here is how he described the very eccentric and recluse Morse: "He was impressive, intelligent. To me, he tried being friendly as possible. But he was somewhat aloof, "different" like a lot of creative people. He believed he was only an instrument to receive the great creative force of the universe. Why didn't he receive plays as great as Shakespeare? Because, he said, he was an imperfect instrument, only good enough to receive radio plays.

When asked about the lost episodes and where they might be, Harmon replied: A: Just lost. If recorded, they were discarded. Many were probably never recorded -- they just went out live.

He was also asked: Very few ILAM recordings exist today; what part did you play with this, if any, with those few shows that currently circulate?
Harmon Answer: I was the first old time radio fan to contact Morse in 1960. At the time, Almost no one was collecting old radio shows. I was a fellow writer, although not for radio. Morse treated me like a colleague. I borrowed the approx. 65 transcriptions of the New York series and a few fragments of the old series (mostly Island of Skulls), and 52 half-hours of ADV. BY MORSE. I copied them to tape, as best I could (I knew nothing about recording at the time) and returned them. Dave Amaral, a professional radio engineer, borrowed the same discs plus the I LOVE ADVENTURE discs we couldn't find at the time in Morse's garage. Dave, later a good friend, did a better transfer to tape. Many of my original tapes are still circulating. I can recognize little things that I know mean they were from my originals -- especially the ADV. BY M. My forty year old masters still play -- with some loss of highs and volume.

From 1939 to 1944 the show was produced in Hollywood. These are the originals which are in high demand. From 1949 to 1952 the show moved to NY. It appears these are the shows Harmon saved. The NY shows were rebroadcasts from original scripts. This is where most of the existing shows come from. From 1940 to 1942 the show went from 15 min/5 days a week to 30 min/2 times a week.  I have found a few complete shows here, but most are only 1/2 an episode (either first half or second half).

Harmon also produced the 1996 reproduction "The Fear that Creeps Like a Cat".

Footnote: I have always found it fascinating that Morse wrote both the wild and creepy ILAM as well as the daytime soap "One Man's Family". He was quite a talent.

Still listening to and sorting shows from the OTRR library. Should have a detailed spreadsheet of existing shows by next week.

jj

--
Sent from Postbox


john koeller
 

I’ve been listening to all of the available ILAM episodes while simultaneously reading the related scripts. I’ve found several errors in episode numbering among the file names for episodes. Example: “Snake with the Diamond Eyes” (1950s version), where there are serious discrepancies.

SPERDVAC has 36 different ILAM scripts of entire story lines that are very helpful in the episode verification process. I suggest that the work people are proposing should include script reading.

John

--
John Koeller
Yorba Linda, Calif
92886 U.S.A.


Jim Jones
 

John
There are errors in almost ALL the ILAM series. I have been listening and
annotating them in a spreadsheet. The errors are so numerous I have added a
"first line" to the spreadsheet just to keep them straight. I will post the
spreadsheet later this week (though the first line project has slowed me
down some) and then we can start sorting and compiling an accurate set of
ILAM.

jj