Joan Davis Bio


Ryan Ellett
 

I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Richard Davenport
 

Inline image

After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]


Labor ipse voluptas


On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:


I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Ian Grieve
 

Why don't you ask Ben Ohmart, the owner of Bear Manor Media and member of OTRR, though via the facebook group.  He will tell you honestly how indepth the book is.

Ian





-------- Original message --------
From: Richard Davenport <klingon1@...>
Date: 8/11/21 7:57 am (GMT+10:00)
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io" <main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio



After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]


Labor ipse voluptas


On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:


I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Walden Hughes
 

Ben wrote the book,

 

Walden

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ian Grieve
Sent: Sunday, November 7, 2021 3:31 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 

Why don't you ask Ben Ohmart, the owner of Bear Manor Media and member of OTRR, though via the facebook group.  He will tell you honestly how indepth the book is.

 

Ian

 

 

 

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Richard Davenport <klingon1@...>

Date: 8/11/21 7:57 am (GMT+10:00)

Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 


After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]

 

 

Labor ipse voluptas

 

 

On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:

 

 

I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Ryan Ellett
 

It came up on the FB page a while back but there was no response.

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"




On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 05:30:48 PM CST, Ian Grieve <austotr@...> wrote:


Why don't you ask Ben Ohmart, the owner of Bear Manor Media and member of OTRR, though via the facebook group.  He will tell you honestly how indepth the book is.

Ian





-------- Original message --------
From: Richard Davenport <klingon1@...>
Date: 8/11/21 7:57 am (GMT+10:00)
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io" <main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

Inline image

After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]


Labor ipse voluptas


On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:


I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Ryan Ellett
 

Jim would occasionally use Wiki entries for some sets but I'd prefer to use an original piece of writing. We've had some very good contributions over the years.

The years this potential set will cover are:
1943-1945 - Sealtest Village Store
1945-1947 - The Joan Davis Show (sometimes referred to as Joanie's Tea Room)
1947-1948 - Joan Davis Time
1949-1950 - Leave it to Joan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"




On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 03:57:32 PM CST, Richard Davenport <klingon1@...> wrote:


Inline image

After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]


Labor ipse voluptas


On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:


I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Walden Hughes
 

Hi Ryan,

 

I can reach out to Ben maybe he would do it if we can mention his book,

 

Walden

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, November 7, 2021 4:47 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 

Jim would occasionally use Wiki entries for some sets but I'd prefer to use an original piece of writing. We've had some very good contributions over the years.

 

The years this potential set will cover are:

1943-1945 - Sealtest Village Store

1945-1947 - The Joan Davis Show (sometimes referred to as Joanie's Tea Room)

1947-1948 - Joan Davis Time

1949-1950 - Leave it to Joan

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 03:57:32 PM CST, Richard Davenport <klingon1@...> wrote:

 

 

Inline image


After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]

 

 

Labor ipse voluptas

 

 

On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:

 

 

I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Ryan Ellett
 

I think I misunderstood Ian's post. I admit I never thought of asking Ben to write it because, to my knowledge he's never had anything to do with OTRR projects.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"




On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 05:30:48 PM CST, Ian Grieve <austotr@...> wrote:


Why don't you ask Ben Ohmart, the owner of Bear Manor Media and member of OTRR, though via the facebook group.  He will tell you honestly how indepth the book is.

Ian





-------- Original message --------
From: Richard Davenport <klingon1@...>
Date: 8/11/21 7:57 am (GMT+10:00)
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io" <main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

Inline image

After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]


Labor ipse voluptas


On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:


I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Ian Grieve
 

I wasn't thinking of Ben writing, I was replying to how in depth the book was on her radio work.  Ben would be able to tell honestly.

Ian





-------- Original message --------
From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io" <oldradiotimes@...>
Date: 8/11/21 11:19 am (GMT+10:00)
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

I think I misunderstood Ian's post. I admit I never thought of asking Ben to write it because, to my knowledge he's never had anything to do with OTRR projects.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"




On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 05:30:48 PM CST, Ian Grieve <austotr@...> wrote:


Why don't you ask Ben Ohmart, the owner of Bear Manor Media and member of OTRR, though via the facebook group.  He will tell you honestly how indepth the book is.

Ian





-------- Original message --------
From: Richard Davenport <klingon1@...>
Date: 8/11/21 7:57 am (GMT+10:00)
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io" <main@oldtimeradioresearchers.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

Inline image

After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]


Labor ipse voluptas


On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:


I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Walden Hughes
 

I check with Ben and he feels Martin would do a better job than what he could for a small bio.  Take care,

 

Walden

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ian Grieve
Sent: Sunday, November 7, 2021 6:15 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 

I wasn't thinking of Ben writing, I was replying to how in depth the book was on her radio work.  Ben would be able to tell honestly.

 

Ian

 

 

 

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io" <oldradiotimes@...>

Date: 8/11/21 11:19 am (GMT+10:00)

Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 

I think I misunderstood Ian's post. I admit I never thought of asking Ben to write it because, to my knowledge he's never had anything to do with OTRR projects.

Ryan

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 05:30:48 PM CST, Ian Grieve <austotr@...> wrote:

 

 

Why don't you ask Ben Ohmart, the owner of Bear Manor Media and member of OTRR, though via the facebook group.  He will tell you honestly how indepth the book is.

 

Ian

 

 

 

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Richard Davenport <klingon1@...>

Date: 8/11/21 7:57 am (GMT+10:00)

Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 


After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]

 

 

Labor ipse voluptas

 

 

On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:

 

 

I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan


Mike Thomas
 

Well that's easy


On Sun, Nov 7, 2021 at 6:24 PM, Walden Hughes
<waldenhughes@...> wrote:

I check with Ben and he feels Martin would do a better job than what he could for a small bio.  Take care,

 

Walden

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ian Grieve
Sent: Sunday, November 7, 2021 6:15 PM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 

I wasn't thinking of Ben writing, I was replying to how in depth the book was on her radio work.  Ben would be able to tell honestly.

 

Ian

 

 

 

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io" <oldradiotimes@...>

Date: 8/11/21 11:19 am (GMT+10:00)

Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 

I think I misunderstood Ian's post. I admit I never thought of asking Ben to write it because, to my knowledge he's never had anything to do with OTRR projects.

Ryan

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 05:30:48 PM CST, Ian Grieve <austotr@...> wrote:

 

 

Why don't you ask Ben Ohmart, the owner of Bear Manor Media and member of OTRR, though via the facebook group.  He will tell you honestly how indepth the book is.

 

Ian

 

 

 

 

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Richard Davenport <klingon1@...>

Date: 8/11/21 7:57 am (GMT+10:00)

Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Joan Davis Bio

 


After leaving The Sealtest Village Store, Davis began her new program on September 3, 1945, on CBS. Sponsored by Swan Soap, the show replaced The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show. The premise had Davis as proprietor of Joanie's Tea Room, which resulted in use of that expression as an alternate title. Its final broadcast was on June 23, 1947.[3]: 127-128 

Like her character on the previous show, in this program, Davis sought romance, especially with the program's singer, Andy Russell. That pursuit brought her in conflict with Barbara Weatherby, daughter of the town's banker. Meanwhile, Davis spurned the attentions of announcer Harry von Zell. A noticeable change from the Sealtest show was that this program had few guest stars, relying primarily on a situation comedy.[3]: 127-128 

Others heard on the program, in addition to Davis, Russell, and von Zell, was Verna Felton as Rosella Hipperton III and Cousin Corneila, Shirley Mitchell and Sharon Douglas as Barbara Weatherby, Si Wills as Serenus, Wally Brown as himself, and Ben Gage as Dr. Ronald Crenshaw.[3]: 127  Bob LeMond was an announcer.[1]: 371  Paul Weston and Jack Meakin and their orchestras provided music in the first and second seasons, respectively. Dave Titus[1]: 371  and Dick Mack produced and directed. Writers included Harry Crane, Larry Gelbart, Jack Harvey, Nat Linden, Herbert Little, Bob O'Brien, Joe Quillan, Jay Sommers, Si Wills, and David Victor.[3]: 127 
Joan Davis Time (1947-1948)
Andy Russell and Joan Davis

After Swan Soap ended its contract with Davis midway through the original four-year span,[2]: 80  Joan Davis Time debuted on October 11, 1947, as a revised version of Joanie's Tea Room, with Davis still owner of the tea shop.[1]: 371  The program focused on "Joan's efforts to improve her life and find a steady boyfriend"[4]—a premise that was reinforced by the show's theme song, "Nobody's Sweetheart".[1]: 371  Humorous incidents arose from Davis' interactions with the tea shop's regular customers as well as with other people she met.[4]

Other than Davis, the main characters were her friend Mabel, played by Sharon Douglas, and tea shop manager Lionel, played by Lionel Stander. Other regulars were Hans Conried, Verna Felton, and Andy Russell. The Choraleers provided vocal music, while Lud Gluskin, John Rarig, and Paul Weston led their orchestras. The announcers were Ben Gage, Bob LeMond, and Harry von Zell. The producer was Dick Mack.[4]

The program ended on July 3, 1948.[1]
Leave It to Joan (1949)
Joan Davis and Joseph Kearns from the radio program Leave it to Joan

Leave It to Joan debuted on CBS on July 4, 1949, as a summer replacement for the first half-hour of Lux Radio Theatre and ran until August 22, 1949.[1]: 371  Davis portrayed a sales clerk in a department store who lived with her father. Most of the plots evolved from her interactions with the store's staff, and each episode featured a guest star.[4]: 194 

Shirley Mitchell played Penny Prentiss, Andy Russell played Tom Hinkle, Harry von Zell played Simon Hackaday, and Joseph Kearns played Davis' father. Ken Niles was the announcer, and Lyn Murray led the orchestra. The sponsor was Roytan cigars.[4]: 194 

Leave It to Joan was the basis for an unsuccessful television pilot, Let's Join Joanie,[2]: 80  which was broadcast on January 12, 1951, on CBS. The TV version had Davis in the role of a sales clerk in a hat store.[5]

 

 

Labor ipse voluptas

 

 

On Sunday, November 7, 2021, 01:07:44 PM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:

 

 

I've been working on a set of Joan Davis shows in fits and starts this year. I'd like to find a volunteer to write a short bio of her for a Maintained set. There is a bio written about her published by Bear Manor that I do not have. The very few reviews I've read of it seemed mixed about it; I don't know how in-depth it goes to her radio work.
Ryan