Must-have OTR book


Ryan Ellett
 

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


Kent Schroder
 

McLeod’s Amos and Andy. Brings real insight into what the early show was like.


On Feb 17, 2021, at 10:02 AM, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:



I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


Larry Maupin
 

Mine is The Great Radio Soap Operas by Jim Cox.  He has a lot of material in his chapters on 31 of the most famous OTR soap operas that cannot be found in any other publication that I have run across.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:02:40AM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


--
Larry Maupin


Ryan Ellett
 

Great choice. I think a Cox book might fill that need for anyone with a particular interest in one genre. He covered soaps, sitcoms, music, crime-fighters, audience participation shows, and news/commentary hosts. His book about the Hummerts, I think, is almost a must-have companion with his Soaps book. But that'd be cheating since I only said one book!

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 10:27:22 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Mine is The Great Radio Soap Operas by Jim Cox.  He has a lot of material in his chapters on 31 of the most famous OTR soap operas that cannot be found in any other publication that I have run across.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:02:40AM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


--
Larry Maupin


Allan Foster
 

I probably shouldn't post on this because I never really read many OTR books.  Dunning's amazing book fulfilled my needs quite well.  However, I did enjoy Leonard Maltin's book The Great American Broadcast.

Allan

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 10:34:04 AM CST, Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes@...> wrote:


Great choice. I think a Cox book might fill that need for anyone with a particular interest in one genre. He covered soaps, sitcoms, music, crime-fighters, audience participation shows, and news/commentary hosts. His book about the Hummerts, I think, is almost a must-have companion with his Soaps book. But that'd be cheating since I only said one book!

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 10:27:22 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Mine is The Great Radio Soap Operas by Jim Cox.  He has a lot of material in his chapters on 31 of the most famous OTR soap operas that cannot be found in any other publication that I have run across.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:02:40AM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


--
Larry Maupin


Larry Maupin
 

Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: "main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:34:04AM
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

Great choice. I think a Cox book might fill that need for anyone with a particular interest in one genre. He covered soaps, sitcoms, music, crime-fighters, audience participation shows, and news/commentary hosts. His book about the Hummerts, I think, is almost a must-have companion with his Soaps book. But that'd be cheating since I only said one book!

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 10:27:22 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Mine is The Great Radio Soap Operas by Jim Cox.  He has a lot of material in his chapters on 31 of the most famous OTR soap operas that cannot be found in any other publication that I have run across.

Larry

-----------------------------------------

From: "Ryan Ellett via groups.io"
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 17 2021 11:02:40AM
Subject: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


--
Larry Maupin

--
Larry Maupin


John
 

It is too hard to rank OTR books.  I cannot choose which would be #2.  I love them all!!  A book which satisfies my love for history is Words At War by Howard Blue, a great book detailing radio during the WWII years.  When I want pure entertainment, I am currently reading Jack Benny's Lost Radio Broadcasts from May 2nd to July 27th, 1932.  

Ryan, I have not had the pleasure of reading one of your books yet.  Which would you say is best?  Is that like ranking your children?  Before this year is over I will add one of your books to my collection.

John    

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:02 AM Ryan Ellett via groups.io <oldradiotimes=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I was adding some books to my OTR library and got to wondering what my second most valuable book would be after Dunning. I really couldn't narrow it down but will say that I've probably read Elizabeth McLeod's Amos 'n' Andy book and Jim Cox's Goodnight Gracie - or at least chunks of them - more times over the years than most other OTR volumes for different reasons. What would be your most-valued OTR book after Dunning's On the Air? Extra credit points if you don't say Jay Hickerson's Ultimate Guide to Circulating Shows! (And Dunning's first edition from the '70s doesn't count, either.)

Ryan


Ryan Ellett
 

Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

Larry



Mike Thomas
 

For research it's got to be Saved resource guide to the golden age. What a treasure. You can know where soooooo many collections and information are. What universities etc. He even put web sites, contact names with the libraries. Invaluable I say.


On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 9:38 AM, Ryan Ellett via groups.io
<oldradiotimes@...> wrote:
Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:


Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

Larry



Walden Hughes
 

Hi Everybody,

 

Jim wrote 25 articles last year that will be sent out to the hobby to different newsletter. I am so glad Jim is back,

 

Walden 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 9:39 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

 

Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

 

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

 

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

 

Larry

 


Ryan Ellett
 

John (I did not pay him to ask this), judging by my sales statements very few have read my books! Or at least bought them. "Best" is a tricky word. Of my "babies" I think the Encyclopedia of Black Radio is the most important; a lot of the information there is still found nowhere else, despite some editing errors that still irritate me ten years later! I've had three or four graduate students inquire about specific individuals and series in the book and I hope someday it leads to much more research into early black contributions to radio. 

But I think the most interesting to sit down and read would be the Texas Rangers, especially if you're into the Western music of the era. They did many films and backed up Gene Autry on film and radio at times. It's a narrative history whereas the Black Radio volume is encyclopedia entries. Of course I like the other two but they are probably more niche.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:31:39 AM CST, John <johnenrietto@...> wrote:


It is too hard to rank OTR books.  I cannot choose which would be #2.  I love them all!!  A book which satisfies my love for history is Words At War by Howard Blue, a great book detailing radio during the WWII years.  When I want pure entertainment, I am currently reading Jack Benny's Lost Radio Broadcasts from May 2nd to July 27th, 1932.  

Ryan, I have not had the pleasure of reading one of your books yet.  Which would you say is best?  Is that like ranking your children?  Before this year is over I will add one of your books to my collection.

John    



Mike Thomas
 

Dave Siegels resource guide. Sorry! It's the phone. This is an absolute must


On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 9:52 AM, Walden Hughes
<waldenhughes@...> wrote:

Hi Everybody,

 

Jim wrote 25 articles last year that will be sent out to the hobby to different newsletter. I am so glad Jim is back,

 

Walden 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 9:39 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

 

Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

 

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

 

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

 

Larry

 


Ryan Ellett
 

I am under the impression that his book writing days are done but would be thrilled to be proven wrong down the road!

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:52:55 AM CST, Walden Hughes <waldenhughes@...> wrote:


Hi Everybody,

 

Jim wrote 25 articles last year that will be sent out to the hobby to different newsletter. I am so glad Jim is back,

 

Walden 

 

From: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io [mailto:main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ryan Ellett via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 9:39 AM
To: main@OldTimeRadioResearchers.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OldTimeRadioResearchers] Must-have OTR book

 

Jim took many years off writing but just in the last few months has picked up his pen again. We ran a piece in the Nov-Dec issue of The Old Radio Times by him. Yes, I believe he was an English and/or Journalism teacher; I don't know to what extent he used OTR in his classes. But aside from his research prowess I consider him the most skilled writer of the small OTR research community; his work is a pleasure to read (for me). He is very much alive and just had his 81st birthday late last year which I understand surpassed his immediate male ancestors. Walden Hughes - a valued participant in this group - has hoovered up a great number of Jim's next articles for the REPS newsletter so I don't think I'll be getting any for a bit. I'm not jealous at all - or maybe a bit.

 

It's hard to believe that most of Jim's OTR books are 15-20 years old now. 

 

 

 

The Old Time Radio Researchers

"Saving the Past for the Future"

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:23:40 AM CST, Larry Maupin <lmaupin@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan, as I recall Jim was a professor at a university (I think it was Western Kentucky but could be wrong), taught courses in popular culture and played episodes of old-time radio shows to his classes to demonstrate the social and cultural history of the OTR era.  Talk about a dream job!

 

I think he is still alive, and wonder if you would like to contact him and ask him to submit an autobiographical piece on that topic to Old Radio Times.  It would be great to have him set the record straight.

 

Larry

 


Ryan Ellett
 

I think Mike meant David Siegel's Resource guide. Autocorrect maybe changed it to Save? Paul Kornman has been working to update these contacts, incidentally. But an amazing resource, no doubt!

Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 11:50:28 AM CST, Mike Thomas via groups.io <thomaspilgrims@...> wrote:


For research it's got to be Saved resource guide to the golden age. What a treasure. You can know where soooooo many collections and information are. What universities etc. He even put web sites, contact names with the libraries. Invaluable I say.




Patrick Andre
 
Edited

Although it is only for one show, the three (3!) volume set called "The 'Who Is Johnny Dollar' Matter"  by John C. Abbott is excellent, and extremely complete.  Everything you ever wanted to know about Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar, and several things you likely didn't want to know.

~Patrick


Paul Kornman
 

OTRR is working on an update to the Resource Guide to the Golden Age for online researcher usage.
The first beta draft can be found here:

https://www.otrr.org/topics.html

- Paul


Matthew Nunes
 

There are also many great books on specific programs. For example, I just finished reading Let's Pretend and the Golden Age of Radio, by Arthur Anderson. It is very good, and I certainly recommend it, even if you're not interested in children's programming.

Matthew

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 01:37:19 PM EST, Paul Kornman via groups.io <pkornman@...> wrote:


OTRR is working on an update to the Resource Guide to the Golden Age for online researcher usage.
The first beta draft can be found here:

https://www.otrr.org/topics.html

- Paul


Scott Galley
 

I've been meaning to pick up "The Texas Rangers: Two Decades on Radio, Film, Television, and Stage, by Ryan Ellett and Kevin Coffey", not only because of Ryan's co-authorship, but also because of the writing/research of Kevin Coffey who has written excellent liner notes for many Bear Family Records releases that I own. And anything to do with Gene Autry is interesting in my books.

I recommend "Drama in Silent Rooms, A History of Radio Drama in Australia from 1920s to 1970s" by Peter Philp and "The Mighty Music Box - The Golden Age of Musical Radio" by Thomas A Delong.

This is a very interesting thread. I already have 12 books that I want to pick up — half of which I knew nothing about.

Scott


Joe Webb
 

John Abbott's 2nd edition is better than the first -- they decided to publish it in 2 volumes instead of the 3

btw John is still adding to the legacy -- his 2nd edition errata page is https://humealumni.org/ytjd/errata.html as he gets new information -- i don't know if there ever will be a 3rd edition, so this page is worth checking every few months.

1975's Tune in Yesterday changed the hobby, and even though it seems "old" is worth having as there is some information that was not repeated or was abridged in the larger On the Air

Martin G's book on Duffy's Tavern is a marvelous work. I never really cared about the series until that came out. Fascinating stories...


--


Ryan Ellett
 

Kevin is a fount of knowledge about both kinds of music, country and western. He was able to talk in nuance about  the Rangers' unique musical styles and their place compared to other genre peers of the era. It was by chance that the webmaster of b.westerns.com put us in touch; I have not talked with him in years now. I believe he's in Scotland (or was) though originally from Texas and had been working on researching the Texas Rangers (who had no connection to the state) totally unknown to me and for far longer than I had. Scott could elaborate, but I think Kevin's quite highly regarded as a historian of the western swing musical style. Unfortunately, in trying to dive further into the Autry business connections I discovered that most of his professional papers had been destroyed in a fire so, sadly, that part of the Rangers' career is not as fleshed out as I'd like and may never be. While they are credited in his films, I don't think the Rangers received on-air credit on the Musical Ranch radio program. This is one thing their manager/owner KMBC president Arthur Church was demanding and Gene said no, I'll get a different band. They were bitter about losing that spot for quite some time.
Ryan

www.RyanEllett.com


The Old Time Radio Researchers
"Saving the Past for the Future"

www.OTRR.org
www.OTRRLibrary.org



On Thursday, February 18, 2021, 07:36:37 AM CST, Scott Galley via groups.io <scottgalley@...> wrote:


I've been meaning to pick up "The Texas Rangers: Two Decades on Radio, Film, Television, and Stage, by Ryan Ellett and Kevin Coffey", not only because of Ryan's co-authorship, but also because of the writing/research of Kevin Coffey who has written excellent liner notes for many Bear Family Records releases that I own. And anything to do with Gene Autry is interesting in my books.

I recommend "Drama in Silent Rooms, A History of Radio Drama in Australia from 1920s to 1970s" by Peter Philp and "The Mighty Music Box - The Golden Age of Musical Radio" by Thomas A Delong.

This is a very interesting thread. I already have 12 books that I want to pick up — half of which I knew nothing about.

Scott